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Thread: OT hurricane Dorien.

  1. #1
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    Default OT hurricane Dorien.

    My heart breaks to see the destruction in the Bahamas.Lets hope the death toll is low. Hope you guys on the east coast of USA are safe and hopefully damage will be at a minimum.

  2. #2
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    While in the tropics you don't need much of a building to be comfortable in as it never gets cold I hope they put up some rugged ones to replace these. Maybe concrete or block with steel rods from slab to roof to hold the roof on.

  3. #3
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    Yes it's sad,but occasional Hurricanes are the price we pay for living where snow doesn't fall every year,or where the ground doesn't shake.They will rebuild,just like we did,with a little help from our friends and neighbors.
    I just need one more tool,just one!

  4. #4
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    I hear the building codes are one of the strictest in the Carrabean. But I think its hard to cater for a twelve hour 300 km wind and a 23 foot surge. I think it would be cheaper to fix the planet.

    My neighboring country had two category 3 or 4 cyclones a month apart.Unheard of so the storm patterns are changing. Over a thousand dead. Its terrible to think some survivors were stuck in a tree for four days.

    I see one american walked into a hardware store and bought a hundred generators anonymously .

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by plunger View Post
    I see one american walked into a hardware store and bought a hundred generators anonymously .
    While the thought is indeed nice, the reality is there will probably be severe shortage of fuel for them in the short term at least.

    I saw this first hand in the aftermath of Katrina. My town was spared any damage and our power was restored in hours. Some friends in a town less than 100 miles away were without power for about 2 weeks. No fuel was available and he was driving to my town to get gas. As were many others. The folks in the Bahamas have no where to turn for any fuel. Their situation is many times worse.

    Sad to say that unless they intend to deliver the generators on a tanker ship loaded with gas, they will, unfortunately, be useless. Better to send solar panels, rechargeable battery packs and inverters.
    Last edited by Bluechips; 09-05-2019 at 11:48 AM.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by plunger View Post
    I hear the building codes are one of the strictest in the Carrabean. But I think its hard to cater for a twelve hour 300 km wind and a 23 foot surge. I think it would be cheaper to fix the planet.

    My neighboring country had two category 3 or 4 cyclones a month apart.Unheard of so the storm patterns are changing.
    It's only unheard of in recent memory and most people's memories are short.Atlantic Hurricanes affecting the East coast of the Americas generally follow a 25 year cycle in the northern hemisphere,there usually will be a 6-8 year period of high activity,followed by 10-15 years of moderate to low activity.The past decade has been below average in both categories.This year the prediction was 8-10 named Hurricanes with 2-4 major Hurricanes making landfall.So far we have seen exactly 2,one mild storm and this one which is a major one.We are actually in a below average activity year.

    The problem we have is with the 24 hour news cycle,alarmists that haven't read the data and haven't done their homework and the general public's short attention span.Where I live Hurricanes are a fact of life and if you were born and raised here you learn to understand them and prepare.There are however a large number of people who have never experienced one,either because they are too young,or they have recently moved here.As an example,the last major Hurricane to hit where I live was Hurricane Katrina,that happened going on 14 years ago.The next time around many people will have forgotten,won't evacuate when told,won't be prepared ad the cycle continues.
    I just need one more tool,just one!

  7. #7
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    Another problem is the weather and news people themselves. They have become alarmists.
    They are taking the role themselves as some sort of first-responder.
    THEY ARE NOT !!!
    They take the winds aloft report of the hurricane hunter aircraft, and submit that as the speed of the storm, when in fact, it well may be 200mph at 10,000ft, it is NOT a Cat-5 on the ground (where the people are)
    As of right now, a weather buoy by Charleston clocked a cat-1 wind, but THEY are calling it a cat-3. It is not., it is a cat-1 and barely at that.
    That same weather buoy saw the whole storm, eyewall, and went inside the eye. The buoy (on the ground/water) clocked a cat1 wind, max.

    I been watching this whole Dorian thing, they are propping up their reports and alarming people.
    When the storm was beating the Bahamas, their report was 12ft seas 200 miles out.
    Truth was Ft. Pierce clocked 8ft seas 105miles out. That is a big disparity from the actual strength of storm.

    What is it that they gain by alarming people and pumping up these storms?
    I'm not denying these storms exist, i'm only saying the forecasters are propping the intensity of what is really on the ground.
    Did you EVER hear them tell about a 'small' hurricane? Isn't there any examples of a mere Category-1 hurricane?
    No, because that does not fit their model.
    They only want to forecast a Cat-5 'life-threatening', inundating, flooding hurricane.
    Because that is what fits their model.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ringo View Post
    Another problem is the weather and news people themselves. They have become alarmists.
    They are taking the role themselves as some sort of first-responder.
    THEY ARE NOT !!!
    They take the winds aloft report of the hurricane hunter aircraft, and submit that as the speed of the storm, when in fact, it well may be 200mph at 10,000ft, it is NOT a Cat-5 on the ground (where the people are)
    As of right now, a weather buoy by Charleston clocked a cat-1 wind, but THEY are calling it a cat-3. It is not., it is a cat-1 and barely at that.
    That same weather buoy saw the whole storm, eyewall, and went inside the eye. The buoy (on the ground/water) clocked a cat1 wind, max.

    I been watching this whole Dorian thing, they are propping up their reports and alarming people.
    When the storm was beating the Bahamas, their report was 12ft seas 200 miles out.
    Truth was Ft. Pierce clocked 8ft seas 105miles out. That is a big disparity from the actual strength of storm.

    What is it that they gain by alarming people and pumping up these storms?
    I'm not denying these storms exist, i'm only saying the forecasters are propping the intensity of what is really on the ground.
    Did you EVER hear them tell about a 'small' hurricane? Isn't there any examples of a mere Category-1 hurricane?
    No, because that does not fit their model.
    They only want to forecast a Cat-5 'life-threatening', inundating, flooding hurricane.
    Because that is what fits their model.
    Interesting facts, where did you get them ?
    John Titor, when are you.

  9. #9
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    They make money off of advertising and if they keep people watching, they can charge more.

  10. #10
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    one can also take the opposite approach and say that it's just part of a large cycle and nothing much has changed climate-wise, you just have to look at it with a longer time frame. The oceans are warming and the ocean levels are increasing, both of which puts more energy into storms and increases the consequences when one makes landfall. That doesn't necessarily mean there will be more storms or that any individual storm is going to be better or worse than average, but it does mean that the extremes are going to become more extreme. Think about Miami - major urban area, already struggling with salt water ingress and flooding. Sea levels on that part of the Florida coast are forecast to be about 1 to 2 feet higher by 2060 than 1992. Even if it ends up at half the lower range, that's still going to expose alot more residents to flood risk and increase the damage caused by a storm, whether or not that storm is stronger than it otherwise would have been.

    Sure, there have been greenhouse Earths during the history of the Earth and species appear and disappear, but that's not alot of consolation to this one species if you're living near the coast or on an island over the next 50-60 years.

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