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Thread: Getting Screws or Getting Screwed.

  1. #21
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    UK, near London
    Posts
    1,266

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    At least you have these local stores. I'm constantly amazed at the mentions of here of getting stuff from a local store that I'd be lucky to find even in one of the UK industrial cities, let alone a more rural town. Much of Europe is far worse than the UK even for a bit of 4x2 timber. In Africa you might be having to go to one of half a dozen countries in the entire continent to find a part common in a USA village.
    Same situation for electrical parts like resistors. 40 years ago there was a little place within cycling distance of me started on someone's garage that had everything to build a radio, but then computers came along, he found them more lucrative and moved on. The equivalent of Tandy in UK (Maplins) only stocked 4 of anything, even 1k resistors, but they folded last year.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    9,692

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    I keep a stock of most socket head cap-screws and set-screws that I need for my day to day stuff. However, I need a lot of onesies and twosies of fasteners that if I bought a full box of, would never, ever get used. I love my local Brafasco (Which stands for Brampton Fastener Company.) I buy enough from them that they give me the onesies and twosies things that I need, as long as they are in stock. If it's something they have to order in, I pay like everybody else. I also buy all of my compression and tension springs from them. They have a stock of most common springs that I ever need for engine valve springs.---Brian
    Brian Rupnow

  3. #23
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    SE Texas
    Posts
    12,469

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    I also have made specific deburring tools for special jobs. One way to approach small diameter ones is to use end mills instead of cutting inserts. An end-cutting end mill set on the axis can square the ruff cut end of a bolt or rod. And an end mill with a 45 degree cutting edge, in an offset hole that is parallel to the main axis can cut a chamfer. But this tool has to be used in reverse rotation (CCW). And the cutting edge of that end mill must be carefully aligned in that hole. Either the tool or the screw can be rotated and rotating the screw may be easier and safer.

    If you intend the tool to be stationary, as in a vise, then the geometry for using an insert can be a lot easier as it will not be a rotating hazard. You can inset the screw/bolt and turn it a few turns with some pressure and bingo, it is deburred.



    Quote Originally Posted by MattiJ View Post
    I use my bolt deburring tool a lot for shortened bolts. Beats filing and grinding but it only works bolts larger than 6mm or 1/4"
    Was thinking of making a smaller version but the geometry gets tricky at least with carbide cutting insert.
    Paul A.

    Make it fit.
    You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    NE Thailand
    Posts
    1,226

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Baz View Post
    At least you have these local stores. I'm constantly amazed at the mentions of here of getting stuff from a local store that I'd be lucky to find even in one of the UK industrial cities, let alone a more rural town. Much of Europe is far worse than the UK even for a bit of 4x2 timber. In Africa you might be having to go to one of half a dozen countries in the entire continent to find a part common in a USA village.
    Same situation for electrical parts like resistors. 40 years ago there was a little place within cycling distance of me started on someone's garage that had everything to build a radio, but then computers came along, he found them more lucrative and moved on. The equivalent of Tandy in UK (Maplins) only stocked 4 of anything, even 1k resistors, but they folded last year.
    One of the wonders of living here as an Englishman.
    My nearest large market town;
    hardware stores - check, several.
    jobbing machine shops - check - several
    steel stockists, mainly tube, some solid - check, several
    electrical repair shops check - several, from tv's to washing machines to fridge freezers to power hand tools with new brushes stocked, commutators turned
    Autofactors - check - several, parts for cars and trucks, tractors stocked going back 30 years to current, AND........ fasteners in Imperial, Brit and US, metric and different grades.
    I've since found a stainless shop in my nearest provincial capital city 55 miles away that stocks BSF, BSW, UNC, UNF, Metric in stainless.... Allens, buttons, hex, screwed..... Not got any BA tho.....
    It's a tough life....

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