Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 24

Thread: Getting Screws or Getting Screwed.

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    A bit to the West of Portland Oregon
    Posts
    257

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tungsten dipper View Post
    You might as well drill a 1/4” hole in a quarter, which would be cheaper than buying a standard zinc washer the same size.
    I would use a nickel instead. It is more appropriately sized and would only be one cent more expensive than I can buy them for here. You really need to stop buying these things from convenience stores.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Edmonton Alberta
    Posts
    1,609

    Default

    Most of the Ag Dealers Case,New Holland,John Deere,Agco,Fendt and so on usually sell by the # price can vary with Dealers being located side by side.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    On the Oil Coast,USA
    Posts
    19,688

    Default

    I've been selling hardware besides doing everything else at work for nearly 30 years.Some things to consider-

    25 years ago we inquired about a complete Midwest Fasteners stock not long after we started selling to the general public.At the time,the cost,wholesale,for the bins,displays and inventory (1/4-1" NC&NF) plus about 40 specialty hardware pull out trays IIRC was north of $25,000.Worse now with inflation.

    Much of that inventory will sit on the shelf for years before it sells,if ever.Some states and locales charge inventory tax at years end on remaining inventory.

    Inventorying fasteners,even with barcode readers and the like is PITA.

    Even with barcode readers,someone must still stab the merchandise on the shelves/pegs and verify physical stock.

    YOU guys know what you are looking for and given the opportunity will self-serve and find your own product.Most of the general public doesn't know what they want or need and requires service.

    Typically we lose money on any bolt/fastener sale less than $15

    Ever see a gallon of milk in the pet food section or a slab of Bacon in the magazine stand at the local grocery?You know how they got there right?Imagine 200 1/4 NF nuts,plunked back into the 1/4-20 NC bin...ya,it happens and we have to sort it out.

    Pre-packaged anything costs more than bulk,always.

    When you factor in all the various types,sizes,lengths,materials and grades of just common fasteners.You end up with about 40,000 unique items in inventory and that is before any of the specialty stuff.

    Basically,small hardware sales to the general public is a net loss,that is why you see the high prices for ones and twos.

    Why do we do it then?Because it gets people into the store and often times they buy other things while they are there.And if you have the inventory,in quantity,at a reasonable price and are knowledgeable,you will get plenty of business including the commercial bulk sales that will make you a profit.
    I just need one more tool,just one!

  4. #14
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    SE Texas
    Posts
    12,567

    Default

    Lowes, Home Depot, Ace Hardware, and almost any other local store is going to be expensive and they will have only limited stock. Ace seems to be the best as far as stock is concerned here in Beaumont, TX but their prices are expensive.

    The farm supply stores (Orschelin, Tractor Supply) have bulk bolts, nuts, and washers priced by the pound. Just scoop out what you want and they weigh it. Different prices for different grades of bolt, but that's it. I get bags full there. But they are FARM supply places and that stock starts at 1/4" and goes up to 3/4" or so. Nothing smaller or larger.

    For some time I have been using a policy that I developed over a few years of fighting these prices. At first I started to buy larger quantities of sizes that I needed and figured would need again. So if I needed a half dozen 6-32 x 1/2", I would buy a box of 100. The rest of the box would not go to waste. And I started a good system for stocking them so I could find them when I needed that size again. If you can't find it, you don't really have it. I learned that when I found myself and others buying the same electronic parts (often expensive OEM parts) over and over again at my places of employment. And time was often a very important factor there so finding a needed part already in house was a very important thing.

    After doing that for a bit, I decided that there were just too many lengths of some screws. I mean, a #6 could be anywhere from 1/8" to several inches long, with over 15 different lengths in that range. Just too many sizes to buy boxes of 100. And then there were different heads: countersunk, round, pan, socket head cap screws, etc. Just too many varieties. So I found ways to cut them to the needed length and started to buy one or two lengths of each variety. So if I needed a 6-32 x 5/8" I grabbed the box of 100 one inch ones with the proper head and cut them down to 5/8". I always had the proper size. Well, almost always. Some types I bought two lengths so for the 6-32s I have 1" and 2" lengths.

    Cutting 20 or 50 screws can be a bit of a chore, so I still buy full boxes of a specific size when I anticipate a need for larger numbers. But up to about 10 or 12 screws I cut to size.

    I have purchased and developed tools for cutting them. The crimping tools for electrical terminals often have a series of cutting holes for shearing screws to whatever length you need while preserving the threads. I have made an accessory for my Dremel tool that cuts even more sizes, including fine threads. And I have developed a 3D printed fixture for holding larger bolts (1/4" and above) in my band saw for cutting them to length. I also have created special pliers to hold the small sizes for filing or grinding the burrs off the cut ends. That is a great way to save pain and injury to my fingers. This collection of tools makes the job of cutting them to the needed length a lot easier.

    Places like McMaster and fastener supply houses will have prices that are a lot better when you buy in bulk. And, of course, there is the internet.
    Paul A.

    Make it fit.
    You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Helsinki, Finland, Europe
    Posts
    3,672

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tungsten dipper View Post
    Have you noticed the high cost of hardware? The price of fasteners are ridiculous! You might as well drill a 1/4 hole in a quarter, which would be cheaper than buying a standard zinc washer the same size.
    So today, I'm wiring some plugs and for a furnace for my shop. First stop was a electrical/plumbing supply house; picked up 4ea. 2 gang boxes, 1ea. 2 gang plug cover, 2ea. 20amp plugs, 1ea. 2gang blank cover and 2ea. 1/2 conduit connectors. My cost was $12.29, (as shown in the top of the pic)
    I don't see what are you complaining, electrical hardware is dirt cheap in US compared to here.
    https://www.taloon.com/jussi-pistora...penGroup=10490

    Fasteners I buy in bulk from tractor supply/harbor freight equivalent. 3-4 usd/lbs is the normal price, if buying more(like hundred lbs at once) or bothering to order online from Germany! you get them to less than 2usd/lbs.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    725

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JoeLee View Post
    What convenience?? Every time I go there they never have what I need.
    So why would you keep going?
    For just a little more, you can do it yourself!

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Helsinki, Finland, Europe
    Posts
    3,672

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
    I also have created special pliers to hold the small sizes for filing or grinding the burrs off the cut ends. That is a great way to save pain and injury to my fingers. This collection of tools makes the job of cutting them to the needed length a lot easier.
    I use my bolt deburring tool a lot for shortened bolts. Beats filing and grinding but it only works bolts larger than 6mm or 1/4"
    Was thinking of making a smaller version but the geometry gets tricky at least with carbide cutting insert.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Yorkshire, Centre of the known Universe
    Posts
    2,053

    Default

    Just bought some O-rings. Looked on tinternet (NO local suppliers anymore) Wanted three different sizes, 1 off each. first supplier, 57p each, approx. 60 cents until you click "Add to cart", MOQ (minimum order quantity) 8 off, same with other two sizes. Second supplier, although showing 1 off price, quoted "Pack of two" when clicking.

    Regards Ian.
    You might not like what I say,but that doesn't mean I'm wrong.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    On the Oil Coast,USA
    Posts
    19,688

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Circlip View Post
    Just bought some O-rings. Looked on tinternet (NO local suppliers anymore) Wanted three different sizes, 1 off each. first supplier, 57p each, approx. 60 cents until you click "Add to cart", MOQ (minimum order quantity) 8 off, same with other two sizes. Second supplier, although showing 1 off price, quoted "Pack of two" when clicking.

    Regards Ian.
    O-rings are a sketchy thing to stock,they do have an expiration date.I have two vendors for them,one sells for a very low price,but only in packs of 25 or 50.The other sells ones and twos,but with a $25 minimum order
    I just need one more tool,just one!

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    4,006

    Default

    For the smaller sizes, if I need 10, I'll order 100, and I'll order 100's of others from McMaster Carr. Rather have a ton of fasteners than keep having to find them locally(in small sizes)which is a wild goose hunt.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •