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Thread: Curb Find of the Week - 15,000 W Generator

  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by v860rich View Post
    That sol. is there to cut fuel to the jets when the ign. key is turned off.
    They want to cut the fuel off when the key is turned off just for the reason you mention, stop flooding as the engine coasts down.
    You've probably heard these small engines back fire when they are turned off?
    That sol. stops the back fire, also the o-ring you mention isolates the jets from the fuel in the bowl so the sol. can do its job.

    THANX RICH
    Precisely!

    Kind of an after-thought to the intrinsic cause of the phenomena, lean jetting and high idle speeds.

    Reminds me of the solenoid actuated dashpots used on early emission compliant carburetors whose solenoid would totally close the butterflies upon switching the ignition off so that the engine would not run-on when shutting down.
    None of this is a problem with FI since all fuel is shut off when the key is off.
    Small engine carb designers thought of this little enhancement about the same time in order to be EPA compliant and keep customers happy.
    Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
    Bad Decisions Make Good Stories

  2. #62
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    May 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by v860rich View Post
    That sol. is there to cut fuel to the jets when the ign. key is turned off.
    They want to cut the fuel off when the key is turned off just for the reason you mention, stop flooding as the engine coasts down.
    You've probably heard these small engines back fire when they are turned off?
    That sol. stops the back fire, also the o-ring you mention isolates the jets from the fuel in the bowl so the sol. can do its job.

    THANX RICH
    Yeah very nice that's actually an improvement as many just cut the spark and not only semi-flood the engine but dilute the cylinder bores lubrication... it's a little more expensive to do things this way as cutting spark is dirt cheap, that's kinda why im so surprised to see this on such an entry level genset...

  3. #63
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    May 2015
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    Quote Originally Posted by v860rich View Post
    That sol. is there to cut fuel to the jets when the ign. key is turned off.
    They want to cut the fuel off when the key is turned off just for the reason you mention, stop flooding as the engine coasts down.
    You've probably heard these small engines back fire when they are turned off?
    That sol. stops the back fire, also the o-ring you mention isolates the jets from the fuel in the bowl so the sol. can do its job.

    THANX RICH
    The "at rest" position of the solenoid is retracted - unless it is stuck. If your theory is correct, then shouldn't the "at rest" position be to close off fuel with the ignition is off and only open when power is applied?

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by SLK001 View Post
    The "at rest" position of the solenoid is retracted - unless it is stuck. If your theory is correct, then shouldn't the "at rest" position be to close off fuel with the ignition is off and only open when power is applied?
    That would make the most sense to me also --- unless it's a time delay that just uses power for a certain amount if time then disconnects - if it didn't then it would kill the battery in short order...

  5. #65
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    But does it run??
    I cut it off twice and it's still too short!

  6. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seastar View Post
    But does it run??
    Also does it produce power and how well regulated is the output?

  7. #67
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    Mid-Michigan USA
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    Just a "heads up " pay attention to the main jets when you pull and clean them,
    most of these engines use asymmetrical jetting. Get em backwards and they're
    not happy.
    Dave

  8. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by SLK001 View Post
    The "at rest" position of the solenoid is retracted - unless it is stuck. If your theory is correct, then shouldn't the "at rest" position be to close off fuel with the ignition is off and only open when power is applied?
    I haven't seen every anti-afterfire fuel solenoid out there, but everyone that I did see was extended by a spring.

    When the key is in the run position the windings of the solenoid retract the solenoid's pintle tip allowing fuel flow through the carb. You can check the operation of the solenoid by simply applying 12V power to the terminal, if it's functional it will retract when power is applied.

    Briggs & Stratton had a problem with after-fire in the muffler upon shutdown due to unburned fuel entering the exhaust system when the ignition was shut off, as these engines have a relatively fast idle speed. The use of the fuel shut off solenoid solved the problem.

    Like I said, haven't seen them all but depending on orientation of the tip in relation to normal fuel flow thru the carb, the spring should keep the fuel flow circuit closed and only allow fuel flow thru the carb and into the engine when it is energized.
    Remember this does not impact the carb's float, needle and seat function, it only controls fuel flow internally.
    Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
    Bad Decisions Make Good Stories

  9. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
    Yeah very nice that's actually an improvement as many just cut the spark and not only semi-flood the engine but dilute the cylinder bores lubrication... it's a little more expensive to do things this way as cutting spark is dirt cheap, that's kinda why im so surprised to see this on such an entry level genset...
    I'm pretty sure that a $3000 15,000 watt gen set is NOT entry level. THIS is entry level:



    BTW, my Predator brand genset ($700) also has an auto fuel cutoff. I kind of prefer turning the fuel off by hand and running till it starts to run rough to empty the carb, but it is nice to never forget it.

    Dan
    At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

  10. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seastar View Post
    But does it run??
    Haven't got that far yet...

    Today, I was going to change the oil (probably not enough hours on the filter to change). It only holds about 1.5 quarts of oil, so I put an appropriate container to catch the oil. Here's what came out:



    I didn't have the second container ready for use, because, hey, it only holds 1.5 quarts. After the first GALLON, I thought that I was going to need a "bigger boat", so I plugged the outlet up and fetched another pot. I estimate about 7 quarts came out of the engine (probably mostly gasoline). It had the viscosity more like gasoline than oil. This explains why I got so much "blow back" thru the carb inlet when cranking. I'm glad that it didn't start up on me - it would probably have killed me in the resulting explosion!

    Since I took out so much "non-oil", I figured that I should replace the filter. I'll pick on up tonight at wallyworld.

    Saga continues...

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