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Thread: Least used machines

  1. #31
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    Jan 2013
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    Anyone ever convert a Shaper into a combination lime squeezer and cocktail shaker?

  2. #32
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    May 2002
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    At the moment my least used machine is my Unimat. Since moving into my present garage/shop, I have not had the time to completely unpack it and it's bench is stacked with other clutter, including a tube tester and a bunch of old tubes that I need to sell. But then, that tube tester is probably even less used and has been idle for a much longer time.

    I do want to get the Unimat back in action.
    Paul A.

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  3. #33
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    Aug 2018
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    Loveland,CO
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glug View Post
    Anyone ever convert a Shaper into a combination lime squeezer and cocktail shaker?
    Theoretically, if I wanted to cut the slots in a receiver that the bolt lugs ride in, what would be the best machine to use?

  4. #34
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    Jan 2010
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    Kansas City area
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    Mine is a BP shaper head. It is barely used, although the paint could be redone. Mechanically like new, I got it when I had plans to get a BP mill, Then got a deal on a CNC mill. Never got the BP, never had anything to mount the shaper head on. I'll probably end up selling it someday, as I have no way to use it.

  5. #35
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    Feb 2003
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    NorCal
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    1. Hamilton high-speed sensitive drill press in good condition. The vari-speed cone drive works fine. It even has a near-new 0-1/8" Albrecht chuck on it.
    2. U2 single-lip cutter grinder (Deckel SO clone). I bought and rebuilt a Quorn, which is at least as useful as the U2 and has supplanted it.
    3. Buehler 8" metallographic polisher. Seems like it would make a great low-speed woodworking tool and knife sharpener, but I have not spun it up in about 20 years. I have a Glendo Accu-Finish that I use regularly.

  6. #36
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    Jul 2017
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    Buffalo NY USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Corbettprime View Post
    Theoretically, if I wanted to cut the slots in a receiver that the bolt lugs ride in, what would be the best machine to use?
    Sinker EDM would be my choice. BUT I'm not made of money, so I'll have to keep my eyes open for a shaper. I have no means of making straight things as of now, only round things with an annoyingly small and flexible lathe. If I need straight and flat, I use files.

  7. #37
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    Apr 2009
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    Ashburton, near Christchurch New Zealand
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    My shaper is very small (Adept 2) but when called upon it** will click and whirr and merrily rip the scabs off rusty chunks of steel scrap.

    ** I should say 'she' as of all the machines in my small shop Sally Shaper is the only one with a name.


  8. #38
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    Mar 2010
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    New England
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
    At the moment my least used machine is my Unimat. Since moving into my present garage/shop, I have not had the time to completely unpack it and it's bench is stacked with other clutter, including a tube tester and a bunch of old tubes that I need to sell. But then, that tube tester is probably even less used and has been idle for a much longer time.

    I do want to get the Unimat back in action.
    I gave my Unimat to my son (also an HSM'er) about 10 years ago. He did a number of projects with it, but now it appears to be relegated to the "least used tool" category.

  9. #39
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    Apr 2012
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    NE Thailand
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    Quote Originally Posted by projectnut View Post
    I think you need Shaper Therapy. It's a form of aversion therapy especially tailored to those who have either a fear or loathing of Shapers. It's a multi step process starting with looking at pictures of the machines. This first step usually takes a couple weeks before the patient can view the pictures without sweating, shaking, or vomiting. Once the pictures can be viewed without negative effects you move to the second step.

    The second step involves actually stepping into a room where an idle shaper is stored. The lights aren't on, the machine isn't powered up or running, just sitting silently in the darkened room. After a few "viewing sessions" the patient is encouraged to walk near the machine and eventually touch it. This step usually takes another couple weeks.

    Step three is to actually see a machine working in it's normal home setting. The patient doesn't touch the machine at this stage, but rather marvels at the fact that it does operate, and can make useful products. This step is best performed in a fully functional shop where the patient can actually see the machinists interact with the machine without fear. Once this situation can be witnessed without adverse reaction the patient can move to the final stage of therapy.

    In stage four or the final therapy stage the patient is encouraged to attempt to setup a work piece in the machine and actually hit the power switch to start the machine. This is by far the most complex and intense part of the therapy, and usually takes the most time to complete. A complete stage four therapy session involves many hours of interaction without adverse effects. The complete process usually takes two to three years to complete.

    If the patient should be so fortunate as to complete stage four they are handsomely rewarded with Journeyman Machinist's certificate. This certificate will allow them to regularly attend MA sessions (Machinists Anonymous) without fear or embarrassment. Just keep in mind the patient will never be cured of this awful disease, but will be in remission. It may require regular attendance at MA meetings to remain in a state of remission.
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  10. #40
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    Jan 2005
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    Buffalo NY
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    Just a few comments about the above mentioned machines.
    I see a few negatives about a radial arm saw.
    Too really make their usefulness shine, you need to mount them
    into a long workbench, right in the middle, with plenty of infeed
    bench space and outfeed bench space. This also includes a
    backstop fence the full length of the bench.
    This way, you can rip long lumber with the saw, and use it to
    straighten the boards. You are not going to straighten a 12 foot
    board on a jointer. The bench also makes it super easy to set
    stops for cross cuts. I think radial saws get a bad rap because
    they are cumbersome on their own legs without a long bench.

    Funny someone mentioned a Hamilton sensitive drill press.
    I just bought one a few days ago, just because it was cute.
    Will see if I get good use out of it, especialy when my current
    small drill press is an Atlas bench top in very good shape.

    I have owned a Deckel FP1 for 10 years. Never used it once.
    It has most of the accessories. Just having a Bridgeport makes
    the Deckel never get used. I should sell it, but what would be
    the sense in that?

    I just bought a planer. We will see if it ever gets used.

    --Doozer
    DZER

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