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Thread: Scotchman 314 Ironworker - Things to Know?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by loose nut View Post
    Definition - Scotchman ; man who drinks to much scotch.
    I guess theoretically,it is possible.

  2. #12
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    Jul 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by garyhlucas View Post
    I never cared for the design of a Scotchman, but I have owned a couple different Gekas which I really liked. The small Gekas had a rocking beam for the punch which would wear to an oval. Salesman called after we owned it for a month and I told him except for that it’s great. He asked how many holes we were getting from a punch and I told him about 5,000. He said that was great life. I said it wasn’t as we were punching around 12,000 holes a week!

    If you are a fabricator and don’t have a hydraulic ironworker you don’t know what you are missing!
    I've been hearing great things about Geka as I've been researching ironworkers but beggars can't be choosers, so to speak! I don't make my living doing fabrication, so I can't justify spending several thousand or more on a nice ironworker. I'll settle for an old junker. I just got through drilling 208 1/2" holes through 3/8" steel and thought I should look for something faster. That's not quite in the same league as 12,000 holes a week

  3. #13
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    Jan 2003
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    We got an old Buffalo#1/2 at work that's unstoppable.People are scared off from mechanicals,but pound for pound they will out work a hydraulic unless you're over the $30k+ range.

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/1-2-BUFFALO...QAAOSwsGlavQjw

    Ours has no trouble punching 13/16" holes in 3/4" plate,its only rated at 58 tons.I also have a #1-1/2 setting out in the weeds waiting for a rebuild when I get time,think it's rated at 85 tons.

    This is a #2-1/2 I believe,a beast of a machine.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fu5Ujbi4Jx0
    I just need one more tool,just one!

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by wierdscience View Post
    We got an old Buffalo#1/2 at work that's unstoppable.People are scared off from mechanicals,but pound for pound they will out work a hydraulic unless you're over the $30k+ range.

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/1-2-BUFFALO...QAAOSwsGlavQjw

    Ours has no trouble punching 13/16" holes in 3/4" plate,its only rated at 58 tons.I also have a #1-1/2 setting out in the weeds waiting for a rebuild when I get time,think it's rated at 85 tons.

    This is a #2-1/2 I believe,a beast of a machine.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fu5Ujbi4Jx0
    The forces exerted there are insane. A bit hard for me to imagine, it makes it look so easy.

  5. #15
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    Jul 2017
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    Buffalo NY USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Metal Butcher View Post
    The forces exerted there are insane. A bit hard for me to imagine, it makes it look so easy.
    Yep we used to have an 80 ton Buffalo at work years ago, it would pop a 1-inch hole thru 3/4 plate without making a sound, all day long.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Metal Butcher View Post
    The forces exerted there are insane. A bit hard for me to imagine, it makes it look so easy.
    Yup,and that was nowhere near it's full capacity.This page lists the capacities by machine size,the flat bar shear cap for the 2-1/2 is 6 x 7/8".

    https://www.bmt-usa.com/ironworkers-uiw/

    They were still in business as of a couple years ago when I ordered some minor parts-

    https://www.bmt-usa.com/

    No telling what a new one would cost,or one of their drill presses.Both are on my "lottery winnings list"
    I just need one more tool,just one!

  7. #17
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    Jan 2007
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    Minnesoa
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaxHeadRoom View Post
    I have always been curious how it got its name?, as there is no such thing as a Scotchman!
    Max.
    Hi,

    I worked for the man who invented that machine, the late Jim Dvorak for a number of years. He considered the design a failure and the sold it out to the current manufacturers. His improved design, the current Uni-Hydro is much better.

    The things to look at when considering a Scotchman or Uni-hydro style machine is,

    First, is it a grease pig? Avoid or at least look very closely at a clean machine. These things need to be greased often and well. Those pins and bushings don't like running dry and will wear quickly and snap in two. They are not the easiest things to replace, a cutting torch and welder required.

    Second, the angle shear has been known to break the punch arm. And the angle shear housing is also known for blowing out.

    Third, avoid the punch station brake. They are notorious for breaking. Lord knows I've made 1,000's of those parts.
    Lastly, the notchers are nearly custom to each machine. And outside of the blades, (and sometimes even then), these are one of a kind units that don't trade parts well.

    Overall, they do work pretty well though. And can really speed a fabrication job. The parts are simple and easy to get. Consumables are even pretty easy to make. If you choose to make your own cutting tools, use S-5 or S-7 heat treated to 57-58Rc. Avoid going harder because you want to tools to bend to failure, not shatter.
    If you think you understand what is going on, you haven't been paying attention.

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