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Thread: Amount Of Force Needed To Shear 12Ga. Stainless Sheet

  1. #1
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    Default Amount Of Force Needed To Shear 12Ga. Stainless Sheet

    I have a few strips of stainless sheet, 12ga. .109. I had the strips sheared at 3 1/2" in width. I should have specified 3 1/4"
    Anyway, I've set some of the pieces up on my mill after I cut them to length and used a slitting saw to trim them, but that's pretty time consuming.

    So If I were to make a shear, a short one that could cut perhaps 6" in length and set up an edge guide and a way to hold the piece down, how much force is needed to shear this stuff?

    I would have to come up with some sort of leverage multiplier set up like bolt cutters have. Something on that order.
    I guess it depends on the angle of the blade also. When a shear cuts it point contact moving along the piece.

    JL................


  2. #2
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    I'm thinking something along the lines of this design. Di Acro makes a short 6" shear but they are only rated at 16 ga. mild steel.



    JL............
    Last edited by JoeLee; 09-11-2019 at 09:02 PM.

  3. #3
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    My chart says 4 tons per linear inch for 12 ga stainless vs 2.75 tons for mild steel if that helps any.Here's an online chart,but it doesn't list 12 ga-

    http://freetechnicalcharts.com/Shear...e_Required.php

    As far as a bought item goes,one of these would most likely do it,compound leverage,does 2" angle and decent sized round bar too.

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Bar-Section....c100010.m2109
    I just need one more tool,just one!

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    Do you need to make many of these? An abrasive (thin blade) or even a bandsaw will make short work, unless you are in production mode. JR
    My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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    Quote Originally Posted by wierdscience View Post
    My chart says 4 tons per linear inch for 12 ga stainless vs 2.75 tons for mild steel if that helps any.Here's an online chart,but it doesn't list 12 ga-

    http://freetechnicalcharts.com/Shear...e_Required.php

    As far as a bought item goes,one of these would most likely do it,compound leverage,does 2" angle and decent sized round bar too.

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Bar-Section....c100010.m2109
    Thanks for the info. Now I have to come up with a way to get that much force to a hand operated shear blade.

    Those bar cutters don't have a blade long enough for what I want to do. They are designed for chopping rod, angle and stuff like that. There is no table either. Basically a big pair of bench mounted bolt cutters.

    This leads me to another idea. If I could make a shear less the handle and leverage multiplying linkage I could use my 15 ton press to push the blade down through the material.
    I'll have to sketch up some ideas.

    JL...........
    Last edited by JoeLee; 09-11-2019 at 11:10 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JRouche View Post
    Do you need to make many of these? An abrasive (thin blade) or even a bandsaw will make short work, unless you are in production mode. JR
    I don't need to make many of these right now, maybe about 6 of them for various size U-bolt saddles. The width of 3 1/4" is the same for all as shown in my picture.

    I do have a bandsaw but it doesn't make a good finish cut. The shear makes a nice smooth rolled off edge on the cut. I would like a shear fixture for future use and fast accurate cuts with good repeatability.

    Layout is very important when I hole saw and dill the holes. Off a few thou and when the clamp is formed the circles won't line up perfectly and the saddle won't sit square on the tube.

    Just trying to think ahead here.

    JL................

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    For an approximation of force, multiply shear strength of the material by the shear area.

    Or just use the charts.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeLee View Post
    This leads me to another idea. If I could make a shear less the handle and leverage multiplying linkage I could use my 15 ton press to push the blade down through the material.
    I'll have to sketch up some ideas.

    JL...........
    That is a good option. I tried it on my press and didnt make a good shear (HF 9" blades). The clamping while shearing is what screwed me up. This after I already made a lower and upper fixture for the press

    Stuff happens and it can be a long road. I did rig up a back up clamp so it would cut instead of tear. This was when I was young (20 ago) and liked to hot weld

    Bones are too hurting now.

    Sounds like a fun project. Need anymore 4140 PH rods JR
    My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeLee View Post
    Thanks for the info. Now I have to come up with a way to get that much force to a hand operated shear blade.

    Those bar cutters don't have a blade long enough for what I want to do. They are designed for chopping rod, angle and stuff like that. There is no table either. Basically a big pair of bench mounted bolt cutters.
    The shear on those is a bypass type just like the one in your first post,only heavier.Being a bypass shear,it can shear an infinite length,just not in one chomp.It lists the "flat strip" capacity at 3.54x .39 inches,but the blade length listed is 7".

    Quote Originally Posted by JoeLee
    This leads me to another idea. If I could make a shear less the handle and leverage multiplying linkage I could use my 15 ton press to push the blade down through the material.
    I'll have to sketch up some ideas.

    JL...........
    It's gonna have to be pretty beefy.I have a Pexto/Wilcox 12" bypass shear that will cut 3/16" mild steel,it also weighs 600lbs.
    I just need one more tool,just one!

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    If you've not seen it already, there is a "This Old Tony" video about building a shear similar to that, it may provide some design ideas or inspiration. I have a small Beverly Jr. throatless shear of that design. It won't do 12 gauge, I think 16 is about the limit, but it is a super handy thing to have on hand. I got it as a sort of extra in a lot of stuff I bought and found that I use it quite often for something or other.

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