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Thread: Amount Of Force Needed To Shear 12Ga. Stainless Sheet

  1. #11
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    Be careful shearing stainless. It gives a nice rounded edge on one side, but the other side can be super sharp. When I worked on contracts involving stainless roofing sheets, the roofers hated the stuff because of those razor edges. That and the glare in a summer sun.
    Rebar fixers don't like stainless tie wire either, always snagging themselves on sharp projecting wire ends where they've been snipped to length.
    'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

  2. #12
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    There are a few you tube videos on these like the one I posted a pic of. Somewhere they list the cutting capacity at 3/16" mild steel. I would think it should cut 12ga. ss.

    What I'm curious about is the blade design...... they all have a curved upper blade as opposed to a drop shear which has a straight blade set at an angle to give point contact along the shearing length. Why are the short one curved?? I take it the curved blade design is so point contact is maintained throughout the movement range of the blade. If it were a straight blade teh contact angle would change as it closes. Am I right??

    I'm almost tempted to buy one of those and add a table and stop fence for repeated accuracy.

    I would like to see what both sides of a piece of sheared material looks like when done on one of these.

    JL...............

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeLee View Post
    There are a few you tube videos on these like the one I posted a pic of. Somewhere they list the cutting capacity at 3/16" mild steel. I would think it should cut 12ga. ss.

    What I'm curious about is the blade design...... they all have a curved upper blade as opposed to a drop shear which has a straight blade set at an angle to give point contact along the shearing length. Why are the short one curved?? I take it the curved blade design is so point contact is maintained throughout the movement range of the blade. If it were a straight blade teh contact angle would change as it closes. Am I right??
    Yes,the angle would change and the tonnage required would increase as well.

    Quote Originally Posted by JoeLee
    I'm almost tempted to buy one of those and add a table and stop fence for repeated accuracy.

    I would like to see what both sides of a piece of sheared material looks like when done on one of these.

    JL...............
    Simple,the saved piece is usually straight with a slight burr on the bottom.The waste piece is curved and twisted and generally scrap.The 3/16" mild steel claim is optimistic at best. I've used probably a dozen different brands of that same shear in 4" thru 8" blade models and the frames get pretty springy on anything above 14 ga mild steel even on the models that include a hold down.It's the exact same problem encountered when trying to cut something too thick with a pair of scissors,the blades simply spring open away from each other(clearance opens up).

    That's why I posted the link to that bigger cutter,it's has a much heavier frame,the tonnage requirement isn't linear.

    Here's a video on making a bypass shear,this could be scaled up-

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LzpV6T9Yltc

    And then there are the guillotine shears made to work in hydraulic ironworkers,this one does 1/4x6" flatbar

    http://www.edwardsironworkers.com/p-....l6UHdphX.dpbs
    I just need one more tool,just one!

  4. #14
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    I watched that video last night.

    The last time I had some of this stuff sheared they must have cut both sides off the table rather than having the piece end up being the drop.
    There is a difference in the edges.

    The piece shown in my first post has the rounded edges on both sides. That's the way I would like all of it.
    The last piece I had sheared had one nice rounded edge and the other edge was flat and sharp, that was the drop.

    I guess unless I specify how to shear it that's what I get. This is why I would like to make my own shear for these.

    JL.............

  5. #15
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    I think the curved blade shear allows it to cut a radius. . curved cuts.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by JRouche View Post
    That is a good option. I tried it on my press and didnt make a good shear (HF 9" blades). The clamping while shearing is what screwed me up. This after I already made a lower and upper fixture for the press

    Stuff happens and it can be a long road. I did rig up a back up clamp so it would cut instead of tear. This was when I was young (20 ago) and liked to hot weld

    Bones are too hurting now.

    Sounds like a fun project. Need anymore 4140 PH rods JR
    Yes, I can always use more 4140. What sizes do you have?

    JL.....

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeLee View Post
    Yes, I can always use more 4140. What sizes do you have?

    JL.....
    I wanna know what you made with the last one first JR
    My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

  8. #18
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    I made an R8 arbor for my BP boring head. I thought I sent you a picture of it??

    JL.............

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeLee View Post
    I made an R8 arbor for my BP boring head. I thought I sent you a picture of it??

    JL.............
    Saw it now. Very nice work. Thanks, JR
    My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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