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Thread: Removing rust

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
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    136

    Default Removing rust

    I have a metal box of Collets that was given to me. Probably50 of them for my Rivett tool room lathe. Some have a light coat of rust. What would you think would be the best way to remove the rust? Being stored in the metal box, probably was a bad idea. I sprayed them with light oil when I got them. I was thinking maybe 2000 wet and dry paper. Any thoughts? Stan

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
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    Kirkland, Washington
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    Degrease, then Evaporust.

  3. #3
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    Nov 2007
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    Woodinville, WA
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    yep... no abrasive, unless you don't care about them. When you take them out of ER, wash in warm water then immediately spray with CC 3-36. The CRC will displace the water and leave an oil film. If you let them dry they will flash rust.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
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    Sunny So Cal
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    I normally like the ER for more items.

    Collets not so much. It doesn't sound like you need that heavy rust removal.

    I have bought some collets that were just shady with red. No big deal. Give them a nice drink of whatever oil you like and drain off the oil and lightly tumble with walnut shell media.

    Thats what I do, dont hold me to it . JR
    My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

  5. #5
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    I wouldn't wash them after Evaporust. If it's left on, it prevents further rusting quite well.

    Alternatively, in place of Evaporust, you can use diluted phosphoric acid solution (like Phosphoric Acid Cleaner from Home Depot or concrete cleaning/etching stuff) to achieve the same result. It will be less expensive, especially, if you dilute it with water.
    Last edited by MichaelP; 09-12-2019 at 12:46 AM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
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    USA MD 21030
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    I use vinegar - cheap and safe. Here are some rusty bolts and nuts I derusted that way. Not pretty, but they are functional. I've also had good results using various grades of ScotchBrite. Only very mildly abrasive.





    I used the same method to clean up a rusty micrometer:



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
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    Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
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    Quote Originally Posted by PStechPaul View Post
    I use vinegar - cheap and safe. Here are some rusty bolts and nuts I derusted that way. Not pretty, but they are functional. I've also had good results using various grades of ScotchBrite. Only very mildly abrasive........
    Agreed. For the cost involved and the results obtained, simple everyday white vinegar is at the top of my list too. Just a couple of weeks ago I used vinegar to derust a couple of wedges I found at a local scrap yard like the one pictured below. They were as badly rusted as anything I have ever seen and a couple of weeks submerged in vinegar removed all the rust and left behind a soft blackish coating that was easily wiped off. They came out as clean as if they were sand blasted.


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Tai Tokerau - NZ
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    296

    Default

    Boil them, turn the rust into bluing.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Warwickshire, UK
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1937 Chief View Post
    I have a metal box of Collets that was given to me. Probably50 of them for my Rivett tool room lathe. Some have a light coat of rust. What would you think would be the best way to remove the rust? Being stored in the metal box, probably was a bad idea. I sprayed them with light oil when I got them. I was thinking maybe 2000 wet and dry paper. Any thoughts? Stan
    Stuff like that with just a light coat of rust, I soak a kitchen scouring pad (plastic, not metal) in oil and rub them over with that. Theres a bit of patina left, but thats no harm.
    'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Michigan
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    1,993

    Default

    Can you post pictures? Are they three or four jaw?

    Evaporust tends to react badly with high carbon steels. It might also dull up any remaining smooth surface. I'd be careful with those collets and wouldn't jump too fast.

    Dollar Tree sells stainless pot scrubbers that are surprisingly gentle. They are my go-to for mechanical removal of rust. They won't work so well for the threads, slots and bores. Avoid the copper ones, they're hard and scratch.

    CRC 3-36 does work well for storage of tooling. It is very light, and when it evaporates it leaves a protective coating. A friend says it even even protects the anvil on his cheap garage vise. I've done similar tests with blocks of metal in the garage with good results. I bought my gallon from Zoro for about $30 (free shipping after $50). They also have an email signup promo where you get a 15% coupon for signing up.

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