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Thread: Removing rust

  1. #11
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    I can't believe the way that mic came out. Must be the surface rust did not pit the surface.]

    I've seen things where surface rust forms so rapidly and looks pretty bad but causes no harm to the surface below. Must be the case with the mic.


    JL.............

  2. #12
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    The nice thing about chemically removing the rust is that it only removes the rust. The good metal is not touched. This can lead to some noticeable pitting but dimensionally if the pitting is not extensive it won't affect the operation and trueness of the collets. It just puts a little more pressure on the "plateaus" between the lower pitted areas. Looks bad but mechanically very usable. So the proper method for something like a collet. By no means use any sanding to remove the rust. And live with any stained areas rather than remove the "stains" which is actually light pitting. Removing the stains by sanding the metal with anything other than the finest of grits will remove enough metal that you risk the collets not being as true as they could be. And even then if the stain does not come away with only a light cleaning up with super fine grit paper I'd stop and live with it.

    A while back I removed light rust from a swap meet find. The body and complete cutter set for a Stanley 55 plane. I opted for Evaporust because I knew it would not try to re-rust the parts like stronger acids will do. Also I liked that I only needed to dunk the parts overnight to get the job done rather than a few days like I'd seen with vinegar when used for anything but the very lightest of rust.

    If you use vinegar to remove the rust I'd give it a wash in mixed up solution of baking soda to aid with neutralizing any acid left in any of the pitting. Then rinse well, flush with WD40 or some other water displacement product and then dip in a good quality lighter oil.

    I've done some rust removal with vinegar myself and found that the items tried to flash rust again when simply rinsed and set on a towel to dry before oiling them. I used the same method with the cutters as they came out of the Evaporust what with being a bit paranoid... Rinsed well, lightly dried with a towel and laid in a tray then showered with some WD40 every four or so new "damp" cutters. After that they were wiped off and oiled with regular oil and put into a little container still wet with oil until I need a particular shape. They were still good when I needed a cutter a few months back for a wood working project.

  3. #13
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    Jan 2017
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard P Wilson View Post
    Stuff like that with just a light coat of rust, I soak a kitchen scouring pad (plastic, not metal) in oil and rub them over with that. Theres a bit of patina left, but thats no harm.
    +1. I ended up with a box of white scotchbrite pads (finest I believe). I'll soak one in Kroil or PB Blaster and scrub a little, no good metal removed. If that doesn't cut it I'll go to regular scotchbrite, still doesn't seem to phase good metal. If there are high spots I hit with a stone or file.

  4. #14
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    For jobs like that, I like to get the oldest, most worn-out kitchen scrubbie (scotchbrite) that I can find. So worn out that it maybe even has holes in it. Soak the part in very light machine oil while scrubbing. Continue till the oil runs clear. Cheap generic baby oil does an amazing job at this.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
    Cheap generic baby oil does an amazing job at this.
    USP grade mineral oil (cheap at big box stores) is the same stuff, without the smell.

    I especially prefer it when sharpening, for when I cut myself and it gets into the wound. Sharpening oils are typically low grade dark nasty mysterium.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCRider View Post
    I've done some rust removal with vinegar myself and found that the items tried to flash rust again when simply rinsed and set on a towel to dry before oiling them.
    I was using vinegar on a motorcycle tank and noticed the flash rust. So I tried apple cider vinegar, worked just as well, and didn't seem to flash rust. Try it next time.

    One thing about vinegar for anyone who wants to try it. It is a little slower than other methods, so have patience.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by asallwey View Post
    I was using vinegar on a motorcycle tank and noticed the flash rust. So I tried apple cider vinegar, worked just as well, and didn't seem to flash rust. Try it next time.

    One thing about vinegar for anyone who wants to try it. It is a little slower than other methods, so have patience.
    A solution of vinegar and salt (saturated*) will attack rust much, much faster. Recommended.

    *saturated: pour enough salt into the vinegar, stirring, until salt begins to fall out to the bottom of the jug you're mixing it in.

    -js
    There are no stupid questions. But there are lots of stupid answers. This is the internet.

  8. #18
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    I won't put salt anywhere near my steels, and particularly cast irons.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by lakeside53 View Post
    I won't put salt anywhere near my steels, and particularly cast irons.
    The salt and vinegar break down into HCl, I've read. Flash rust the moment you pull the item out of the solution. I deal with that by immediately rinsing the derusted item in hot water and spraying with light oil.

    I do this outdoors, nowhere near my tools and machines.

    -js
    There are no stupid questions. But there are lots of stupid answers. This is the internet.

  10. #20
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    Use of salt. This is one of those old 19th century concoctions when they only had basic household materials and no knowledge. In such recipes salt is used as a scouring agent that breaks down easily so for example used for cleaning tea stains off crockery perhaps with lemon juice or vinegar for luck. So wifey tells husband how she cleaned the cups and he uses it to clean his tools which of course rust more 'cos of the salt but he's not clued up to realise that the vinegar/lemon acid is doing the cleaning. But you are so leave out the salt and please stop perpetuating the old wives tales.

    Someone earlier mentioned phosphoric and brick cleaner in the same sentence. The former is a mild acid that leaves a bit of phosphate coating as a protective layer but brick cleaner is normally Hydrochloric which is a good deruster for two inch bolts and stuff you don't care about too much but is also a bad promoter of rust from its residual traces so not to be used on precision tools.

    For vinegar I use the left over from pickled onions. Sure it is slower but if the stuff is otherwise gong to waste why not use it.

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