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Thread: How to make an English Wheel

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Phoenix
    Posts
    3,353

    Default How to make an English Wheel

    I found this book at the library today. It includes a chapter on how to make an English Wheel, with either a 32" or a 43" throat-depth. It is welded up from square tubing. You can "look inside the book" here: https://www.amazon.com/Sheet-Metal-S...s%2C198&sr=8-3

    I wondered about the power source for this metal shaping tool. This video makes that clear: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hePmCEjDSu4
    Allan Ostling

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Chilliwack, BC, Canada
    Posts
    5,581

    Default

    Power source ? ! ?

    About a year ago I went looking on YT for sheet metal forming as pertains to cars and planes. I pleasantly blown away at the well done "how to" videos on this topic. And with the number of great videos on using an English wheel as well.

    From a home shop perspective the biggest deal is finding really good material and machining the actual wheels. I'd say that for many of us working with round solid stock up to around 4 inches would be OK. Past that I'd want to do weldments from thick wall tubing and turn the shapes from those. But if one were keen it's certainly doable. And not at all complicated.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    south western Mi
    Posts
    49

    Default

    I have seen the wheels for sale from a car restoration company, or on E-Bay. I would like to play around with one just to see how it works.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Edison Washington
    Posts
    1,186

    Default

    I built one close to 20 years ago. I used this kit- http://www.metalace.com/product/44f-...ish-wheel-kit/
    It works very well.
    I took a workshop, a long time ago, from one of the masters, Ron Fournier. So I learned enough to get in trouble- and once every couple of years, I make something with the english wheel.
    When you need it, you need it.

    I found that it was well worth paying for the hard parts to be machined by somebody who knew english wheels- which is why I bought the kit.
    I have also found that using the right metal makes your project much easier-
    so I keep some 3000 alloy aluminum, and some 1008 Aluminum killed steel sheet around.
    Trying to use 6061, or cold rolled steel, will drive you nuts, especially when you are starting out.
    And, learn to anneal both.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    Saranac Lake, NY
    Posts
    389

    Default

    Ries, Do you know where Aluminum killed steel can be bought in smallish quantities? I haven't been able to find any. A good source would make my life easier. JA

  6. #6

    Default

    About 15 years ago I bought a magazine size booklet (56 pages) from metal guru John Glover at the Daytona Turkey Run. Lots of drawings, dimensions and clear instructions for it's construction and use. It would probably be considered a bench top size with about a 18-20" clearance to the center of the wheel. I doubt that he is still alive today but there might be some copies floating around.

    The English Wheeling Machine
    How To Build And Use The Small English Wheeling Machine
    by John Glover

    published (2001) by Metalcraft Tools, Macclenny, FL 32063

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