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Thread: Why Do Companies Over Rate Their Junk Products ??

  1. #21
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    I notice that the Eastwood only claimed 5/8" capacity for round and square, and 2 1/4" x 1/8" for angle.
    Having said that, the guy on the video didn't seem to have to exert himself much to shear the 3" flat. Maybe it helped that they seemed to know how to set it up by making adjustments and - shock, horror- oiling it from time to time. Didn't seem to be on a particularly heavy bench.
    'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by RB211 View Post
    I don't understand what good they are, even if they worked, when they leave a horribly deformed edge on the workpiece?
    Hi,

    Properly adjusted, a shear should leave a better edge than what he shows. It really appears that the machine is not only being worked over capacity, but it isn't properly adjusted. Many times those shear blades need to be shimmed to a proper gap. Generally .005" to .010" is a good place to start for air gap. And honestly, for most welded fabrication, how much better do the ends really need to be?

    Ironworkers are a whole lot faster than a saw for a fab shop and they are also much cheaper to run, The various blades will often last for years and many thousands of cuts.

    One has to wonder if Baighley bought these CCC ironworkers and marketing mis-translated or typo'ed the capacity specs and just didn't care to check their work. Never attribute malice to situation when stupidity and carelessness fits the problem.
    If you think you understand what is going on, you haven't been paying attention.

  3. #23
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    Most machine tools have different ratings for various materials, such as mild steel, stainless steel, aluminum, and copper. Also, it is usually necessary to make some adjustments to a new tool, especially from China. Most bad reviews and videos that I have seen can be explained by observing incorrect technique, poor preparation, and misapplication. Sometimes people purposely abuse a tool for dramatic effect in hopes of getting more YouTube views and subscriptions.

    The company website shows the current specifications for the machine:
    https://www.baileigh.com/manual-ironworker-sw-22m-5

    You can buy a hydraulic version for $2800:
    https://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_476_476

    Sometimes they are on CL, Facebook Marketplace, or eBay for under $2000.
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/METAL-PRO-4...dWwMW&LH_BIN=1

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by RB211 View Post
    I don't understand what good they are, even if they worked, when they leave a horribly deformed edge on the workpiece?
    I agree --- and you would not even to be able to gauge the cut length that accurately either so would have to either machine or chop saw anyways,,, only real advantage i can think of is in close quarters with other machinery its way better than using a chop saw due to the abrasive dust,,, far cleaner work too so who knows maybe that's the big advantage..

  5. #25
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    Hmm.
    In bold letters it says will shear 4"x 3/8" flat, In smaller print lower down it says 4"x 5/16".
    Now shears 5/8" round and square and 'angle irons of various thicknesses'
    'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
    I agree --- and you would not even to be able to gauge the cut length that accurately either so would have to either machine or chop saw anyways,,, only real advantage i can think of is in close quarters with other machinery its way better than using a chop saw due to the abrasive dust,,,
    The advantage is time, and lots of it. Its commercial fab shop tool - say you have cut 500 pieces of 4x4x3/8. We've got ours set with rollers and a stop bar with switch - push the stock through and it hits the button and cycles the machine. seconds per piece.

    You don't get the work if you don't quote competitively and you don't make money if you squander time. The extent of the irregular finish left on the end of decent ironwork or plate shear just doesn't matter when the parts are all being welded together
    .

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mcgyver View Post
    The extent of the irregular finish left on the end of decent ironwork or plate shear just doesn't matter when the parts are all being welded together
    that's what i was thinking is it just must be for weld assembly, and yeah your talking the real machines not the one in the vid as that guy would eat his lunch first piece lol

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
    that's what i was thinking is it just must be for weld assembly, and yeah your talking the real machines not the one in the vid as that guy would eat his lunch first piece lol
    I'm no promoter of crappo tools, just defending iron workers and there usefullness in general We have to have saws too, (ironworker doesn't like hss for example) but whenever you can, you use the iron worker. It is heads and shoulders above a saw. I've got two now, bigger is an 80ton peddinghaus, posted videos of it here before. Got it all rebuilt now, blades sharpened, what a beast....iirc we fed it a length 3/4" x 10" steel as a test and just cuts it without complaint.
    Last edited by Mcgyver; 09-21-2019 at 03:45 PM.
    .

  9. #29
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    of course this all has to be pretty mild steel though right? and - all blades have to part the material so that explains the end of round bar looking more like Gumby's head than an actual part off lol

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mcgyver View Post
    The advantage is time, and lots of it. Its commercial fab shop tool - say you have cut 500 pieces of 4x4x3/8. We've got ours set with rollers and a stop bar with switch - push the stock through and it hits the button and cycles the machine. seconds per piece.

    You don't get the work if you don't quote competitively and you don't make money if you squander time. The extent of the irregular finish left on the end of decent ironwork or plate shear just doesn't matter when the parts are all being welded together
    Time is exactly it,in production you can't fiddle around with a bandsaw. About 25 years ago we had a contract to make 300 of those municipal garbage can baskets.The ones that are welded up out of scrolled 1/2 x 1/2 square bar.We had at the time a large Marvel hacksaw and an ancient Pexto manual bar shear.There were 36 bars in each basket,along with two flat bar hoops.My helper and I set up a stop and we chopped 2 bars at a time.He and I did all 10,800 bars and all 600 straps in a little over 2 eight hour days and not a dime of electricity was spent,except for lights

    Now we got a mechanical ironworker and a big bandsaw....and are both bigger around the waist
    I just need one more tool,just one!

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