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Thread: Why Do Companies Over Rate Their Junk Products ??

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
    of course this all has to be pretty mild steel though right? and - all blades have to part the material so that explains the end of round bar looking more like Gumby's head than an actual part off lol
    Some companies cut AR400 plate with guillotine shears so even a pretty hard material goes if its not too thick. (1/4" for AR400 for some examples that I found)
    Those fortunate enough with no AR400 machining experience it is considerably harder than grade 8 bolts for example.

  2. #32
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    Hi,

    When I was building ironworkers, the material they were meant to cut was A36 mild or AISI1018 round or square bar. These are the most common steels used in a welding/fab shop. Even some A36 could be a bit iffy sometimes. No ironworker is meant for tool steels.

    If you have the blades adjusted correctly and the work properly presented to the tool, (don't let it just hang in the air like the guy in the video), you will get a good enough cut for fabrication work. Accuracy is a matter of how well you set your stops, if you bother to use one. They are about as accurate as any saw you will find when measuring dead length while being light years faster than a saw.
    If you think you understand what is going on, you haven't been paying attention.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattiJ View Post
    Some companies cut AR400 plate with guillotine shears so even a pretty hard material goes if its not too thick. (1/4" for AR400 for some examples that I found)
    Those fortunate enough with no AR400 machining experience it is considerably harder than grade 8 bolts for example.
    Wow, those are some tough blades because they have to be durable too not brittle hard,,, there's allot of crazy side forces when pieces are getting "pinched" off like that...

  4. #34
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    1-1/2" x 10' capacity plate shear-

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GZ0mj0ELRKQ

    I just need one more tool,just one!

  5. #35
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    Just like butter ! Interesting thing is that that machine appears to be completely fabricated from plate weldments, no castings. In days gone by, American stuff like that would have been massive iron castings. I guess not much of the custom iron foundry and pattern making business left in this country.

    Joe B

  6. #36
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    Yeah but anyone seeing what im seeing ? hope their not counting on all the thickness of that plate to be straight cuz there might not be enough meat for cleaning it up and making it flat again,,,

    tune into about 3:14 ish and watch all the plate deformation --- the dang rust on the bottom can't even hang on it's changing dimensions so much lol

    impressive --- yeah "kinda" but so is using explosives lol give me a fuquing plasma cutter and spare having to haul 55 tons around...

    USA -- pffhhh lol
    Last edited by A.K. Boomer; 09-21-2019 at 08:12 PM.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeCB View Post
    Just like butter ! Interesting thing is that that machine appears to be completely fabricated from plate weldments, no castings. In days gone by, American stuff like that would have been massive iron castings. I guess not much of the custom iron foundry and pattern making business left in this country.

    Joe B
    Not as much as there used to be,but then shears haven't had much in the way of castings in along time.We have an old Cincinnati 1/2x12' at work,built in the late 40's.Only thing on it that is cast is the gearbox that drives the eccentrics.Everything else is 3-1/2" steel plate,bolted,keyed and wedged together.
    I just need one more tool,just one!

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
    Yeah but anyone seeing what im seeing ? hope their not counting on all the thickness of that plate to be straight cuz there might not be enough meat for cleaning it up and making it flat again,,,

    tune into about 3:14 ish and watch all the plate deformation --- the dang rust on the bottom can't even hang on it's changing dimensions so much lol

    impressive --- yeah "kinda" but so is using explosives lol give me a fuquing plasma cutter and spare having to haul 55 tons around...

    USA -- pffhhh lol
    That's the drop off side,the keeper is straight and flat.Trick is when re-cutting the drop,the distorted side becomes the drop side and the shearing action straightens it back out.Plus if you notice the drop at the end,it's nearly flat anyway.
    I just need one more tool,just one!

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeCB View Post
    Just like butter ! Interesting thing is that that machine appears to be completely fabricated from plate weldments, no castings. In days gone by, American stuff like that would have been massive iron castings. I guess not much of the custom iron foundry and pattern making business left in this country.

    Joe B
    Nope guess not. All the pieces are all laser cut and welded together.

    JL....

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by wierdscience View Post
    That's the drop off side,the keeper is straight and flat.Trick is when re-cutting the drop,the distorted side becomes the drop side and the shearing action straightens it back out.Plus if you notice the drop at the end,it's nearly flat anyway.
    I've never seen one of those big shears curl the drop piece. Low angle straight blade. those hand shears we were talking about earlier with the curved blade are ones that roll your cut off piece.

    JL...

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