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Thread: BP Left Rear Table Way Lacking Oil

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    Default BP Left Rear Table Way Lacking Oil

    I put a Bijur one shot oiler on my BP a long time ago. recently I've noticed that the left rear flat table way is dry, even after a couple shots and traversing the table.
    It seems to pick up a little oil, probably what carries over from the right side.

    Both table front flat and v's are getting oil, so is the right rear. Just the left side is dry. Saddle to knee are OK.

    The V is wet. I'm assuming it's an issue with the metering jet that serves that section (flat way) of the table.

    The metering jets are on the manifold and easy to get to. Any one ever run into anything like this??

    JL........
    Last edited by JoeLee; 09-21-2019 at 12:56 PM.

  2. #2
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    No, but now you've given me something else to worry about when I start setting up my new to me Supermax mill.
    “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

    Lewis Grizzard

  3. #3
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    My homemade one shot setup with Asian clone oiler took quite a bit of tweaking to distribute oil evenly. In addition to the metering valves, each line has a check valve, otherwise oil in the lines drains downhill back to the manifold and the pump action is wasted on re-filling the lines.

    I suppose it's possible that something is plugged but normally oil circuits don't plug if they are used regularly.
    Last edited by MTNGUN; 09-21-2019 at 01:21 PM.

  4. #4
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    If it is not the metering unit (blocked, toss it and replace) here is good chance your oil, tube has fallen out of the hole under the saddle..

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave C View Post
    No, but now you've given me something else to worry about when I start setting up my new to me Supermax mill.
    Here is your advanced warning.
    A lot of guys tend to forget to periodically check to see if oil is getting to all the points assuming all is AOK. Not always the case. Some find oiut when it's too late.

    JL............

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by lakeside53 View Post
    If it is not the metering unit (blocked, toss it and replace) here is good chance your oil, tube has fallen out of the hole under the saddle..
    No oil tubes on this one. The holes are drilled through the saddle, drilled them myself when I put the system on it. The 90 degree brass elbows screw into the saddle.

    JL............

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by MTNGUN View Post
    My homemade one shot setup with Asian clone oiler took quite a bit of tweaking to distribute oil evenly. In addition to the metering valves, each line has a check valve, otherwise oil in the lines drains downhill back to the manifold and the pump action is wasted on re-filling the lines.

    I suppose it's possible that something is plugged but normally oil circuits don't plug if they are used regularly.
    I'm not sure where the check valves are. Have to look it over real close.
    I don't believe they are in the metering jets, maybe in the pump or at the manifold input ??

    The handle comes back slowly after I push it down. By that time all the oil should be where it has to go. the lines look like they are full of oil, nothing running back.

    JL.............

  8. #8
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    There are two types of oil systems.
    Metered Flow (~ 50 PSI) and Injectors ( 300 PSI +)
    Bridgeports use metered flow and place different size flow (orifices ) at various points so the proper amount of oil
    is delivered to each application and so therefore you will have different metering sizes in a turret mill.
    If dirt enters the oil system, the metering unit is most likely the clogging point.
    First Step. Move the table far right , exposing the rear and front table way surfaces on the left.
    operate the pump Multiple times (!) ( twice is not enough) You will expose the oil groove on the way and can observe is any oil is flowing
    (You may have already done this Joe, based on your observations)
    If no oil appears, then disconnect the oil line at the pump.
    If the oil continues to flow out of the disconnected line, then you do not have a check valve (seen that) or it is not functioning .
    Hook up a air line and put about 100 PSI in the line for several seconds and observe the exposed way mentioned above.
    If you see oil bubbles or feel air coming out , your metering unit is OK.
    Be aware that oil will come out from all lube points , so have a rag or two handy.

    If it is open, then your pump is not meeting volume OR pressure needs.
    If not open, then its overhaul time.

    Know this ...all Oil Points are closer to the pump , than the table ways
    I use the 'One Shot" pump three times when I lube... but my BP is 76 years old
    I believe BP wants you to use the "One Shot" hourly , so drain down can and does occur (The saddle and knee are lower points)

    Rich

    PS Don't forget guys to take that vise off occasionally and remove the plug and oil the Leadscrew Nuts !
    Last edited by Rich Carlstedt; 09-21-2019 at 04:07 PM.

  9. #9
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    If it's any consolation. The Beaver milling machine I rebuilt had four oil zerks for the table and saddle and four for the knee. After I rebuilt it it has a few more:-




  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Carlstedt View Post
    There are two types of oil systems.
    Metered Flow (~ 50 PSI) and Injectors ( 300 PSI +)
    Bridgeports use metered flow and place different size flow (orifices ) at various points so the proper amount of oil
    is delivered to each application and so therefore you will have different metering sizes in a turret mill.
    If dirt enters the oil system, the metering unit is most likely the clogging point.
    First Step. Move the table far right , exposing the rear and front table way surfaces on the left.
    operate the pump Multiple times (!) ( twice is not enough) You will expose the oil groove on the way and can observe is any oil is flowing
    (You may have already done this Joe, based on your observations)
    If no oil appears, then disconnect the oil line at the pump.
    If the oil continues to flow out of the disconnected line, then you do not have a check valve (seen that) or it is not functioning .
    Hook up a air line and put about 100 PSI in the line for several seconds and observe the exposed way mentioned above.
    If you see oil bubbles or feel air coming out , your metering unit is OK.
    Be aware that oil will come out from all lube points , so have a rag or two handy.

    If it is open, then your pump is not meeting volume OR pressure needs.
    If not open, then its overhaul time.

    Know this ...all Oil Points are closer to the pump , than the table ways
    I use the 'One Shot" pump three times when I lube... but my BP is 76 years old
    I believe BP wants you to use the "One Shot" hourly , so drain down can and does occur (The saddle and knee are lower points)

    Rich

    PS Don't forget guys to take that vise off occasionally and remove the plug and oil the Leadscrew Nuts !
    Mine is the metered flow type with the different size orifices.

    There are 8 of them on the manifold that feed the table, saddle and screw nuts. The column is fed from a cross.
    I can't move my table that far with out removing the scale and reader head, and I don't want to get into that.
    Easiest way for me is to pull the plastic line coming off the metering valve that feeds the way, pump the handle and see if any oil comes out of the metering jet.
    If not then that's the problem.

    I did notice some sludge sitting on the sump well tube. You know that brown sludge that separates from oil when it's been sitting in a container for a long time. I have a feeling that's the issue with the jet.

    JL..............

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