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Thread: Teflon to Metal

  1. #1
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    Default Teflon to Metal

    I am building a fence for a bandsaw. I have Teflon pads, 4 of them I want to put on the sliding part of the clamp. I thinking I am going to have to drill holes and melt the Teflon into the holes to lock them in place but I want to keep them flat.

    The pads are 1/8 x 1 by 2 inches. They will allow the fence to slide right and left until clamped. Two will be on the bottom of the fence and two on adjustable arms to line up the fence.

    Any body have any thoughts on what to use?


    Thanks

  2. #2
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    I have a vague memory that I read somewhere that molten Teflon is a health hazard.
    Personally, I'd just use countersunk screws.

  3. #3
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    I built one for my tablesaw maybe 10 years ago. I used UHMW and used flathead screws, 6-32 IIRC. Been holding fine.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by outlawspeeder View Post
    I am building a fence for a bandsaw. I have Teflon pads, 4 of them I want to put on the sliding part of the clamp. I thinking I am going to have to drill holes and melt the Teflon into the holes to lock them in place but I want to keep them flat.

    The pads are 1/8 x 1 by 2 inches. They will allow the fence to slide right and left until clamped. Two will be on the bottom of the fence and two on adjustable arms to line up the fence.

    Any body have any thoughts on what to use?


    Thanks
    Under no situation should you try to melt Teflon. You might die.

    You are a wood worker? Why not just use a physical attachment and profile it. JR
    My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

  5. #5
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    Permabond makes a primer that is applied to PTFE to allow cyanoacrylates to stick to it.

    https://www.permabond.com/2015/06/10...rial-adhesive/

  6. #6
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  7. #7
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    Oct 2014
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    Can you use teflon or nylon screws?

  8. #8
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    If it's pure teflon, it will flow over time (especially if using screws/bolts). I would suggest uhmw....

  9. #9
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    Sep 2009
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    Teflon sheets are available etched on one side so you can glue it.

  10. #10
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    I don't know if "you will die" as one poster said, but there is a condition called Teflon flu from breath Teflon fumes. Given the wide spread use of Teflon in many products, some of which get overheated I doubt its something that happens instantly or cumulative. However a certain amount of reasonable caution makes sense here. I would not deliberately melt Teflon.

    Starboard makes a great sliding surface and is easily machined. HDPE cutting boards come to mind. I bought several from a restaurant supply when I needed some HDPE stock for various projects. It was cheaper than from my usual plastic vendors at the time. One of my buddies cut strips and mounted them to the bunks of his boat trailer so he could push his mud boat off the trailer in shallow water. Also goes on a lot easier. Better make sure its secure though or it will slide off on the road. He just used stock thick enough to easily use counter sunk head stainless screws.

    I don't know much about UHMW so I looked it up. From: https://www.differencebetween.com/di...w-and-vs-hdpe/
    The key difference between UHMW and HDPE is that UHMW contains long polymer chains with very high molecular weights whereas HDPE has a high strength-to-density ratio. UHMW stands for Ultra High Molecular Weight polyethylene.
    There are some quite good side by side property comparisons on that page.
    *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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