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Thread: JC Hannum auction

  1. #11
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    sometimes the auctioneer will pay a guaranteed price, and then sometimes they lose if the do it wrong.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by lynnl View Post
    How old was Jim, anybody know? He was certainly always a positive presence here. Never an unkind word from him.

    A lot of nice looking firearms, and all look very well cared for!

    What constitutes a falling block? Would that be anything other than bolt action or a break action, or of course an automatic. Does the term mean the block movement literally has to be from high to low? ...that's kinda what the name suggests.
    I looked up his obit, Jim was 78. For those who might care, the obit contains his picture. https://www.newcomertoledo.com/Obitu...nnum/Toledo-OH
    “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

    Lewis Grizzard

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Tiers View Post
    I must have been under a rock, since I did not know he had passed. Sorry to hear that.

    We're losing too many now, here and at PM.
    I know I've been under a rock - weighted down by too many diversions in life. I'm saddened to hear of this also.

    The few times I have been able to get back here and try to catch up I haven't seen Flylo around. Is he still with us?

    Best wishes to ya’ll.

    Sincerely,

    Jim

    "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

    "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by EddyCurr View Post
    If the photos are any indication, the Auctioneer does not know the first thing about machinery or tools, especially for metal working.

    Out of respect for JCH, people here could attempt an intervention.

    If nearby members reached out to the auctioneer and whomever is in charge of the estate, perhaps their assistance could be put to use in identifying items, gathering together related pieces and laying everything out in a meaningful manner.

    Even distant members could participate. Using the existing photos as a starting point, a lot can be done towards identification, gathering and organization for display.

    You won't know unless you try ...



    .
    Having attended and bought at many, many auctions this question always comes up. Do the auctioneers purposely not have things organized in reasonable combinations, tooling with its associated machine, etc, etc. Some auctioneers do welcome advice from potential buyers about what's what, but only before the brochures are published, especially when the auction is online.

    Several times I've had to buy accessories as a separate lot since they weren't included with their correct machine. Other times I needed the accessories for an already owned machine and was glad they were separate. It can make for some interesting bargaining between bidders after the sale. No matter what, the auctioneer can't satisfy everybody.

    It's always possible the shop is such a small part of the estate the executors aren't so concerned anyway.
    Last edited by DR; 10-08-2019 at 12:31 PM.

  5. #15
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    It is common for auctioneers to mix stuff up intentionally, or rather, to intentionally not organize lots. That is how they can sell junk lots. It is also critical to keep the auction moving - you don't want to waste time trying to up the bid on junk lots. By having good items mixed in, the bidding moves along and wastes less time. Also, if the auction slows down on junk lots, then people leave and are not present to bid on better stuff.

    I was at just such an auction a few years ago. People were observed shuffling items together in lots and the auctioneer got angry and announced anyone doing that would be ejected.

    They want you to have to buy two or three lots to get the holder and the inserts, etc. It isn't an auction unless there are two or more bidders.

  6. #16
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    I hate the blabber mouth style auctioneers, cannot stand those guys and in fact one of the reasons "some" of them go so fast is to actually confuse people into outbidding themselves on their last bid, I have seen this, they blab and get a bid then stare into the crowd elsewhere and pretend real quick they got a higher one (with mumbled words and stuff) then start asking for the challenge on it and if the original bidder does not challenge higher and nobody else does then he will go back to the OB and say "sold" blahblah blah at the first original non-fictitious price...

    those guys are losers - slow it down and be honest about it or get a real job...

  7. #17
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    OTOH: i've seen auctioneers correct someone who got confused and was bidding against himself.

  8. #18
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    the really stupid one they do is sell second set of lathe jaws separate from chucks. oh well chucks are cheaper that way..

  9. #19
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    Jan 2004
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    Missouri
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    Quote Originally Posted by 754 View Post
    the really stupid one they do is sell second set of lathe jaws separate from chucks. oh well chucks are cheaper that way..
    And change gears split in different lots....

    At tag sales, change gears individually priced separately.....
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Clarke View Post
    Looks like Jim left for the evening, and never came back.
    -That's probably exactly what happened. Not many get the chance to properly close down their shop (or house, or farm, or whatever) before passing on.

    You close up for the night, have dinner, go to sleep, pass away in your sleep. Or wake up with breathing problems, head for the hospital, never come home. A sort of step uncle of mine did that- retired, but still busy, was working on rebuilding some piece of heavy equipment, was still helping tend a farm, etc. Woke up one morning feeling poorly, went to the hospital. Wound up checking in for what turned out to be a serious illness, and three weeks later had passed on.

    Left the dozer half-built, a literal yardful of projects just waiting for him to get around to, his computer was still on and a half-written email to his daughter still on the screen.

    Sad, but it happens. when a topic like this comes up, the common response is the suggestion that one make up a list of one's equipment, and what should be done with it- this goes to friend #1, this other thing goes to friend #2, etc. (Sort of like, but not really the same as a will.)

    Others have suggested making a list of whate the major things are worth, so the wife or family can sell it all at a reasonable market value. I'm sure that'd work for some people, but I'm sure few elderly wives are going to want to take a bucnh of digital photos, make a bunch of Craigslist postings, and spend the next six months letting strangers float through the shop pocketing things and arguing that this "$3,500" lathe is really only worth $1,000, etc. (To day nothing of changing demand, changing value, etc.)

    Doc.
    Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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