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Thread: JC Hannum auction

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    4,452

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    When the local community college closed and auctioned off all the machines, the teacher- who had been maintaining them for 35 years- offered to help sort things out so that the correct tooling went with the correct machines, etc.

    The auctioneer specifically refused.

    During the auction longtime regulars at the college shop noted that key parts had almost certainly been deliberately put in with piles of junk- the auctioneers are no dummies, they do that specifically to get the junk lots to sell.

    Years ago, when I got my Republic-Lagun surface grinder from a Borough auction, it turned out the base casting was in a completely different lot- I never even saw it, but a friend alerted me to it later. I was able to chase down the guy that bought the lot and he sold me the base for $100. I have no doubt that the auctioneer did that deliberately.

    Doc.
    Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

  2. #22
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Canada
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    3,278

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    You guys are such comedians.

    - Auctioneers intentionally put holders and inserts in different lots.

    - That auctioneer's helper KNEW that a certain nondescript base BELONGED with an obscure & obsolete machine that has outlived everyone that ever had the slightest bit of knowledge about them. He put it in a separate lot on PURPOSE.

    - Everybody knows those change gears were part of a set and belong together.

    - Only a crook would intentionally split outside chuck jaws into a separate lot from the chuck they belong to. Look, the chuck keys are in a different lot, too !!

    What nonsense !

    A FEW auctioneers have knowledge about machines and tools IN GENERAL. A VERY FEW auctioneers have, detailed knowledge about the myriad arcane aspects of METAL WORKING MACHINERY and TOOLS SPECIFICALLY. NEARLY ALL auctioneers understand that real or imagined dishonesty HURTS BUSINESS. MOST auctioneers are in business for the LONG HAUL.

    I know some auctioneers - they are better people than others I am acquainted with.

    Has anyone here actually made any effort to improve prospects for JCH's estate?

    The gunsmithing and reloading equipment is all foreign to me, and presumably the auctioneer. No doubt members here could help identify and organize those items, too.
    Last edited by EddyCurr; 10-09-2019 at 10:34 PM.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    4,452

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    Quote Originally Posted by EddyCurr View Post
    What nonsense !
    -What nonsense to be speaking out of turn.

    The fact is, the auctioneer they brought in for the college has what is apparently a well-earned reputation for shady dealings, up to and including using shill bidders. In this case, I've spoken with the teacher several times over the years afterward, and he's said on several occasions that parts that had been stacked on, and in at least two cases bolted to machines, had been removed and placed with junk materials.

    In my case, the friend that alerted me to it was one of the people that worked in the maintenance shop the grinder came from. They palletized it complete and assembled (albeit disused and grungy.) The auction people supposedly deliberately unbolted the grinder from the base, and put them in two separate lots. The grinder and vacuum all by itself, and the base paired with a ratty old drill press, along with no less than three old CRT monitors. (They weren't consecutive lots, either- I forget the exact numbers, but it was something like the grinder was around 125, and the base was closer to 250.)

    It's like anything else in the world- you get good, honest auctioneers, and you get dishonest ones trying to maximize their take. The fact is the auctioneer is in it for himself- he tries to maximize the bids because of course that maximizes his take. He doesn't give a hamster's patoot about keeping this chuck with that lathe, or those gears with this machine, or that vise with this mill.

    Doc.
    Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Warwickshire, UK
    Posts
    866

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    I once went to a deceased estate (I mean a proper estate, stately home, several thousand acres etc) sale which was being sold up by the relatives. It was fascinating stuff, nothing thrown away for 100 years or more, outhouses full, estate workshops including forge, joiners shop, sawmill etc driven from an oil engine via flat belts.
    One person had been the left the real estate and another one the moveable items. There was a stand up row between them at the sale because one aledged the other had had machinery unbolted from the floor to make it a moveable item, when it had been fixed and formed part of the real estate.
    The rack saw bench was fixed, and not for sale, but the spare saws, boxes of saw teeth, the gulleting machine etc etc, all the stuff you need to use a rack saw, was being sold as a moveable item, and had to be bought in by the one who had inherited the real estate, because he wanted to keep the mill going. It was highly entertaining to the crowd, but the poor auctioneer must have really earned his money that day.
    'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Appalachian Ohio
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    869

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    If you see Santa Claus at this auction, say hi.

    I plan to go.

    I've been told with my very full white beard, grey hair, wire rim glasses and overly generous midriff I look a lot like Santa Claus. I'll try to remember to take a red tee shirt, probably with a fire department logo on it.

    Ho Ho Ho.

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