Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15

Thread: How to make parts for Lathe on Lathe !!!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Slinger Wisconsin
    Posts
    73

    Default How to make parts for Lathe on Lathe !!!

    Didn't know exactly how to title this but heres my problem. I am going to build a reveres tumbler for my G4000 9 x 20 lathe. I got almost all the pieces I needed to get this buildt but now just wondering how to make parts on the lathe if I need it to make the parts? A couple of the new parts are a press fit on parts that are mounted on the lathe and would not be able to run lathe without those parts. So what do others do in this situation. I don't have another lathe so I'm not sure how to do this. Do I just remove the parts that the new parts will press on to and mike them up ,then put it back together make the parts and hope they fit? I've made many parts for updates on this lathe but they were always so far that were done without dismantaleing the lathe to make them. Any suggestions would be helpful. Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    9,740

    Default

    Turn a couple of dummy shafts to exactly match the diameters on the parts on the lathe. Then go ahead and make the part and use your dummy shafts for "fitment".
    Brian Rupnow

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Chilliwack, BC, Canada
    Posts
    5,648

    Default

    If you don't have enough of a recess or stub to measure for the press fit I think you'll need to take the item apart to measure then press back together to use it for making what you want to make. And since it's easier to make a perfect match on an OD I'd say make a pin like Brian suggested. And what I like to do when I make a test shaft like this is put a bit of a step or taper on one end so that when the .002 reduced "pilot" starts to fit then I can take more care to sneak up on the final fit of the ID part.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    SF East Bay.
    Posts
    6,626

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Old School View Post
    Do I just remove the parts that the new parts will press on to and mike them up ,then put it back together make the parts and hope they fit? I've made many parts for updates on this lathe but they were always so far that were done without dismantaleing the lathe to make them. Any suggestions would be helpful. Thanks
    This is where loctite is your friend. You don't need a perfect press fit on some parts and loctite has formulas that can bridge a small gap. This will allow you to make the new part a slip fit so you can make the part to the stated specifications instead of making it to fit.

    I have not quite figured out which part you need to remove that would prevent the lathe from functioning. Are you doing the mod as shown on Steve Bedair's site? ( http://www.bedair.org/Tumble/Tumble.html ) If you remove any of the gears near the spindle the only thing you lose is power feed/threading. You can still move the carriage by hand and the big pulley is driving the chuck, so boring and turning are not impacted.

    Dan
    At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Slinger Wisconsin
    Posts
    73

    Default

    danib, Here I go again being a dum a-- you are correct Thank You. The gearing that needs to be removed won't hurt running the lathe by hand. Yes the setup I am making is close to the one he has on his site but just a bit differant. The one I am making is the one from C. Berkeley Tricking Out The 9 x 20. They are pretty much the same but prefered the Berkeley better, but this one wasn't his idea either he got it from someone else. Thanks again for turning on the light bulb !!!!!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Somerset UK
    Posts
    2,480

    Default

    When we were making new parts for the apron of the museums Smart & Brown model A, the apron, leadscrew and rack were on the bench, so we used the tailstock to push the saddle along to machine parts.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Chilliwack, B.C.
    Posts
    11,831

    Default

    Sometimes you just need to ask here. It's common enough to have a sort of mental block- happens to me lots.

    One of the first parts I made on my 8x18 (9x20 basically) was a cross slide lead screw to replace the poorly made one. Of course it's left hand thread, so I had to install a reversing gear. I realized I could use any of the change gears for that, since the tooth count doesn't matter. Strictly a manual thing- no lever or anything, just mount it and adjust the 'big gear' so it would mesh properly.
    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    1,545

    Default

    When I got my first lathe, and I was missing a drive pulley, then I turned the lathe by hand. Yes, I made a handle, and I turned the spindle by with my left hand, while feeding with my right. Felt a bit of a fool though, tilll I'd finished. It can all be done !
    Richard

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    SE Texas
    Posts
    12,564

    Default

    It has been said that the lathe is the only machine that can make itself. By that they mean that it is possible to make a lathe from scratch, without a working lathe or any other machine tools. Books have been written about this. The one that first comes to mind is "The Metal Lathe" by David Gingery.

    https://www.amazon.com/Metal-Lathe-B.../dp/1878087010

    In it he describes the process of creating a metal lathe from scratch using castings from a home foundry and the techniques for machining them and the other parts in a sequence that allows them to be made with the partially complete lathe. Even is you will never make your own lathe, from scratch or otherwise, it is a book that is certainly worth reading.

    I don't think it is described in that book, but even gears can be constructed from scratch. Where there is a will, there IS a way.
    Paul A.

    Make it fit.
    You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Slinger Wisconsin
    Posts
    73

    Default

    OK just wanted to let you fellows know that the reverse tumbler is up and running and yes I did use the lathe with most all the gears removed to do machining that needed to be done. Needless to say it didn't all go so well. Everything worked out till I was installing it on the machine, things just didn't line up. After the not so good feeling I let the darn thing set for 2 days well I went to work. Thinking about the issue for awhile and away from it a few more light bulbs lite up and today I did some additional changes. found that on my lathe the mounting plate on the machine was a bit thicker than the plan was set up for so needed to machine off some of the new gear mounting plate to give it more room. It all has worked out and was still worth the trouble. Overall cost was only like $30.00 some stuff I had but a few needed to be bought. Of course now that it is working I may be adding a few things to make it my own. Thanks Again everyone !!!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •