Page 5 of 7 FirstFirst ... 34567 LastLast
Results 41 to 50 of 68

Thread: Call into the Universe

  1. #41
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Posts
    24

    Default

    Thanks Paul

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Buffalo NY USA
    Posts
    574

    Default

    The part circled in red is the threading dial -- it looks very much like the South Bend part. I would look on eBay, for one from a model 9A, it looks so similar its amazing. Also the broken gear selector in white, very similar to the 10k gear selectors. Same thing, look on eBay USA. There are usually dozens of them at any time.

    The money conversion and the shipping may be too much for you from the USA, but there is also an Australian lathe that is near-identical to the south bend, including the parts you need. Trouble is that I cannot remember the brand name, my memory fails me.

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Chilliwack, B.C.
    Posts
    11,831

    Default

    Looks like fairly minor stuff to fix/replace/repair. The threading dial you can do without- you just change the technique you use for threading. The selector lever might be functional inside the gearbox- but in any event you can probably rig it to sit in one position where it might suit a common thread range. The lock lever on the tailstock should be pretty easy to fix, and the handwheel- well it depends on whether the lead screw is ok.

    You'll have a decent lathe there when you're done.
    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    durban s africa
    Posts
    1,521

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
    The part circled in red is the threading dial -- it looks very much like the South Bend part. I would look on eBay, for one from a model 9A, it looks so similar its amazing. Also the broken gear selector in white, very similar to the 10k gear selectors. Same thing, look on eBay USA. There are usually dozens of them at any time.

    The money conversion and the shipping may be too much for you from the USA, but there is also an Australian lathe that is near-identical to the south bend, including the parts you need. Trouble is that I cannot remember the brand name, my memory fails me.
    Is it not hurcus.?Or something like that. We dont really have e bay or the post office will lose your parcell. You definitly dont need the thread dial.The other two things on the tailstock will be easy fixes. I would think you could use the good selector as a template (pattern) and cast an aluminium gear selector with little fuss.

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Buffalo NY USA
    Posts
    574

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by plunger View Post
    Is it not hurcus.?Or something like that. We dont really have e bay or the post office will lose your parcell. You definitly dont need the thread dial.The other two things on the tailstock will be easy fixes. I would think you could use the good selector as a template (pattern) and cast an aluminium gear selector with little fuss.
    Yes, Hurcus. That was it.
    Good point about being able to cast new parts. However I can't imagine life without a thread dial. I know it can be done, but I wouldn't want to.

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    516

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
    Yes, Hurcus. That was it.
    Good point about being able to cast new parts. However I can't imagine life without a thread dial. I know it can be done, but I wouldn't want to.
    Ummm, it's a South Bend copy. Do we know if it has a metric or Imperial lead screw? If it's Imperial, he can't use the thread dial anyway assuming his threading will be metric.

    -js
    There are no stupid questions. But there are lots of stupid answers. This is the internet.

  7. #47

    Default

    I'm the ghost from "machinists past", my brother notified me about a response to a very old thread I started long ago. My select lathe is pretty much pristine except for some corrosion bubbling under the paint on the aluminum headstock cover lid and perhaps a bit on the gear change cover at the left hand end which is also aluminum. Mine has seen very little work and no crashes, all pretty much as sold new. The leadscrew is inch and I made a set of metric transposing gears for it.
    If you look at the Select lathe in Tony's Lathes.uk sight you'll see some horrific gear damage to both the back gear and other places I think. The guy who owns that lathe is a friend of mine and a capable restorer, he removed the broken gears and ran a VFD to it. He said the power take off to the cross feed shaft is a hokey design and attributed it to all the damage, but to me it looks like the cross feed had zero to do with it, it looks more like a major crash into the chuck to me.
    I'm sure they originally had a manual of some sort for it but haven't found anything yet, I gave up looking long ago. For such a small capacity this lathe is extremely heavy, cast iron pan, legs, etc, lots and lots of cast iron. The company, Lin huan, made gazillions of small turret lathes for use all over the world and apparently this small hobby lathe was a venture, somewhat on the leading edge of the far eastern invasion. Being made in Taiwan the quality is certainly sufficient for hobby use or as a small lathe to take smaller work to in any machine shop.

    There is a lot of asia bashing that goes on about machine tools but I've gotten my money out of every asian machine I ever bought, a lot of them need special attention at first to undo sloppy fits, and even sand in gear boxes left over from the foundry at times. When you look at very large machine tools you'll see the prices nearly as high as the few Western manufacturers machines.

    I have a commercial machine shop and the Select I bought because it was so cute, and I knew about Lin Huan and the turret lathe business. I'm almost 70 and am thinking of retirement and the little Select lathe I hope to include in my hobby shop, because when you've spent most of your life using machine tools you'll never want to be without one, even in old age. I plan on installing a DRO on it, as I haven't used a lathe without a DRO to any degree since the 90's, thinking DROpros for the Select.
    Last edited by partsproduction; Yesterday at 01:17 AM.

  8. #48

    Default

    One other thing about this little Select that IS important. When you run the back gear un engaged make sure you put the small lock pin at the upper left side of the headstock box into the hole and test that the eccentric is locked. If my friend's Select had been running out of backgear and the eccentric happened to engage the BG that would also explain the bull gear's broken teeth. When I got mine that little lockout pin with black plastic knob on top was laying in the pan, I'm glad I figured out what it was for because just pulling the spindle over by hand you can see the back gear trying to engage without being told to.

  9. #49
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Posts
    24

    Default

    Someone also mentioned that the SB 9A could be the same. I checked eBay USA and agree that the moment I receive the part at home I will have to walk to town or stay a couple of days hungry - the shipping is expensive!
    Thanks.

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Posts
    24

    Default

    Darryl, the lead screw is fine and agree if it comes to that I can just push a pin into the gearbox. I picked up a type of 'lever' from a pawn shop today for $1 and believe I can make the tailstock functioning.
    Already I am feeling better seeing the progress.
    Thanks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •