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Thread: Led bulb for t8 lights

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by true temper View Post
    Thanks for the help so far, a bit confusion to me, I just want to make sure I get the right bulbs.
    What do you think about this? https://www.amazon.com/Parmida-LED-E...s%2C244&sr=8-5
    They are not frosted, the output is not the best, and they will look too blue (cold). For some reason, color temperature of LEDs doesn't correspond to the color temperature of fluorescents: LEDs of the same color temperature always look much colder (bluish).

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by chipmaker4130 View Post
    Nearly all T8 fixtures have reflectors and/or diffusers and most of the 360deg illumination is re-directed downward. The LED replacements use no reflector internally, and as you mentioned, the light is all directed downward thereby negating 80% of the effect of an existing reflector.

    I'm speaking from my own experience retrofitting three buildings with 120 8' lamps. If you buy the HO equivalent output in LED lamps, the energy savings drops dramatically. If the intended use is a home shop with low ceilings then it will probably work. If high-bay, you're going to end up with less light.
    Reflectors and diffusers, esp. those used with the garage light fixtures are far from being efficient. We'll inevitably lose a chunk of useful light energy due to it.

    LED tubes do not need any reflectors, because they concentrate ALL light they produce in, roughly, a 120-degree beam. So, as long as the items are within the lighted spot (shaped as a triangular prism), they will be brightly illuminated. But as soon as you move away from the beam, it will get darker. So, when you plan your fixtures, take it into consideration. If you want even illumination in a large shop, you'll need to position the fixtures so that the beams touch or overlap each other. Or, maybe, find tubes with slightly wider beams, etc.

    If we just replace the existing T8 with LED tubes, we'll get a different lighting pattern: instead of a relatively evenly, but moderately illuminated space, we get several brightly lit areas. Since many of us position light fixtures near machinery and other work areas, we may benefit from the more intense illumination there at the expense of the area in between. If you don't want such compromises, consider increasing the total number of fixtures.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelP View Post
    I like Hyperikon and used them to replace all my flourescents starting a few years ago. Between residences and work, I, probably, replaced a couple of hundreds of them. No complaints so far.

    Here are the ones I use: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00S5O83BG/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1 ,

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    I used both, ballast compartible and bypass types. The former were used with ballast for a few years, but, finally, I removed ballasts in all my fixtures, so both types are used without ballasts.
    +1 For the Hyperikon bulbs and direct wire. No buzz, no hum and snap starts even on cold, damp mornings.
    I just need one more tool,just one!

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelP View Post
    Reflectors and diffusers, esp. those used with the garage light fixtures are far from being efficient. We'll inevitably lose a chunk of useful light energy due to it.

    LED tubes do not need any reflectors, because they concentrate ALL light they produce in, roughly, a 120-degree beam. So, as long as the items are within the lighted spot (shaped as a triangular prism), they will be brightly illuminated. But as soon as you move away from the beam, it will get darker. So, when you plan your fixtures, take it into consideration. If you want even illumination in a large shop, you'll need to position the fixtures so that the beams touch or overlap each other. Or, maybe, find tubes with slightly wider beams, etc.

    If we just replace the existing T8 with LED tubes, we'll get a different lighting pattern: instead of a relatively evenly, but moderately illuminated space, we get several brightly lit areas. Since many of us position light fixtures near machinery and other work areas, we may benefit from the more intense illumination there at the expense of the area in between. If you don't want such compromises, consider increasing the total number of fixtures.
    That might be the case if you buy bulbs without diffusers covering the LEDs. The Toggled lights I used have plastic tubes over the LEDS and do not leave any "dark spots" that I can see unless you look at the wall right near the ceiling where the fixture itself is blocking the light. I don't do any work near the ceiling. I have 13 fixtures in my 25 X 50 shop. The Hyperikon have diffuser tubes and might perform similar to the Toggled. I see they are about the same price. See picture below of a corner of my shop. Way better than the T8 lamps.


    EDIT: I thought the Hyperikon had translucent tubes over then like the Toggled, but I see that is not the case. Therefore, my personal recommendation is the Toggled.

    tmb
    Tom

    Last edited by flathead4; 10-09-2019 at 08:11 AM.

  5. #15
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    The Menards lights have no diffuser, but they actually put light in places that the old T12 bulbs did not. I use the same fixtures, so no difference there.
    1601

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  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by flathead4 View Post
    That might be the case if you buy bulbs without diffusers covering the LEDs. The Toggled lights I used have plastic tubes over the LEDS and do not leave any "dark spots" that I can see... The Hyperikon have diffuser tubes and might perform similar to the Toggled.


    EDIT: I thought the Hyperikon had translucent tubes over then like the Toggled, but I see that is not the case. Therefore, my personal recommendation is the Toggled.
    I'm not sure what you meant while talking about Hyperikon, but I can tell you that they come with clear and frosted tube over the LED array, and I strongly prefer the frosted ones. They diffuse light and make it look like a fluorescent bulb vs. a row of discrete blinding LEDs.

    The new light pattern may not be obvious to you, mostly, because you have white walls and ceiling that reflect and diffuse light very nicely. My shop is OSB covered inside, the ceiling is a bit lower and the light fixtures are more concentrated above the machines and other work spots, so the pattern is more noticeable. It's not as dramatic as incandescent spot light vs. flood light, of course, yet it's different than what I had with T8s. But I definitely don't regret replacing T8s. That's for sure.

  7. #17
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    Thanks for the replies. I was trying to be cheap and not spend 10 bux per bulb. It only hurts once to get the right stuff. One shop is 12 foot inside the big shop is 20’ inside. How will they work in the tall one?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  8. #18
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    My second attempt at this post, RE: The brightness of LEDs vs fluorescents.

    My shop is in my garage with it's ceiling at about eight feet. The ceiling is white and the walls or at least what you can see of them are cheap wood pannel that is a medium color between black and white. Not ideal, but not the worst either.

    With the fluorescent tubes I had constant problems and even when all 12 tubes were working, I did not find the light to be adequate. And that was one important reason why I wanted to convert to LEDs. The constant need for maintenance was another as was the cost in my electric bill.

    I looked at the specs. for the LED bulbs and at those for several brands of fluorescent tubes and that had me concerned about the level of light that I would wind up with. It seemed like an even exchange at best and perhaps I would even lose a bit of light in the process.

    I was totally blown away when I turned on the 12 LED bulbs in the shop. Here's my reaction:



    The light was not just equal to the fluorescents, but much, much better.

    I credit several factors:

    1. The directional nature of the LED tubes. They do naturally direct all of their light DOWN. I don't know the actual angle, but it is all DOWN where I want it. The fluorescents direct the light equally in all directions so half of it must be reflected by the fixture in order for it to go down. There ARE losses in this reflection process.

    2. The fluorescent bulbs were always in different stages of their life and their brightness decays as they age.

    3. I suspect that the ballasts in the inexpensive shop lights were not the best. There were problem where even new fluorescent bulbs had trouble coming on in the first place and then not running at their rated brightness.

    I did not take any light meter readings, but with decades of experience with lighting in both photography and professional TV studios, my impression is that the level with the LED bulbs is at least 150% of that of the fluorescent ones at their best. And I have not had even a single problem with them since they were installed. I expected some due to the cheap, shop fixtures that I am still using, but there have been absolutely none.

    In addition to the shop, I also replaced many other fluorescent bulbs with LEDs in my house: kitchen, den, laundry room, etc. In many of these areas I was able to replace four tubes in a fixture with three LEDs or even two LEDs in some places. The light is as good or better than it was with the fluorescents. And, here is the acid test; my wife has no complaints. That is a BIG WIN as she never holds back.

    I think it has been about three years since I started the great LED project. Between the electric bill and buying zero replacement fluorescent bulbs, I have probably saved at least half of the price that I paid for the 40 LED bulbs by now. Pretty soon it will be all gravy.

    I am delighted with the LED bulbs. And you do not need to be concerned with the light level if you replace fluorescents with LEDs. It is win, Win, WIN!
    Last edited by Paul Alciatore; 10-09-2019 at 06:28 PM.
    Paul A.

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  9. #19
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    I'll throw my vote of approval for the Hyperikon bulbs. Way more light and it dropped the current draw down to about half of what it was with T8 bulbs. They have been in for 18 months and not one failure.

  10. #20

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    When I designed my new shop in 2005 lighting was very important, as well as wall, ceiling, and floor colors. The new shop area is 18 x 34 or 612 sq ft, with 10’ ceilings. My former shop was a two car garage 24 x 26 or 624 sq ft, with 9’ ceilings. The old shop had dark walls (blue paint, and concrete gray floor) with 7 four foot 2 bulb fixture and it was dark. I had lots of auxiliary lights here and there. For the new shop I investigated recommended colors in shop environments (found some standards someplace on line at the time) and the ceiling and walls are all white, satin not gloss. The floor is tile red for contrast to minimize eye strain (and it is easy to find little screws against the tile red color). At the time I found a free software lighting program that had as its input light fixtures codes. The fixtures I choose were 4 bulb with diffuser. They were the ones used for drop ceiling installation. The program was fairly sophisticated in that it asked for wall and ceiling colors, fixture height from the floor, room size, ceiling height. and what type of environment. The environments were extensive living room, kitchen, factory, etc and various types of activities – circuit board asm, packaging, etc. It also asked about working surface heights. I experimented and choose clean room with highest light level requirement. It came back with 10 fixtures ie 40 bulbs. At first I did not believe it but after playing around with different parameters I concluded that 10 was the number (no wonder my old shop lighting was inadequate). It also provided the spacing from the walls etc ie the whole layout. I installed the lights and have two switches for the lights. Each outlet has two duplex receptacles one for each circuit. It allowed me to balance the light for what I was doing, basically if I am not using one side the lights are off. All lights are on maybe 50% of the time. The shop is real easy on the eyes, all the surfaces have even lighting.

    I date the bulbs when I replace them and have been averaging 4 to 5 years on a bulb. I am in the shop 80% of days from 9 to around 8 so they are on a long time. They are turned off when I leave during the day so a number of recycles during day when outside (mowing, garden, lunch, dinner, etc.). I replace when they are dying, not necessarily out.


    I am going to see if I can find a similar software package (the one I used is long gone) and try it with LED fixtures. Based on all that has been shared here I would expect to see a fixture or at least the number of tubes reduced. I expect to keep the diffuser fixtures and remove the ballasts. I will report back on any findings.

    Bob

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