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Thread: Stanley Opening New Plant for Craftsman Tools in Texas

  1. #1
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    Default Stanley Opening New Plant for Craftsman Tools in Texas

    Stanley Opening New Plant for Craftsman Tools in Texas

    https://www.stanleyblackanddecker.co...rt-worth-texas

    Excerpt from page:

    "The new plant in Fort Worth will manufacture a wide range of CRAFTSMAN mechanics tools, including sockets, ratchets, wrenches and general sets. The plant will also leverage some of the most advanced manufacturing technologies available to optimize productivity and sustainability, including pre-flattening steel technologies to improve material yield by almost 25 percent, as well as water and energy management technologies to reduce resource consumption. The Fort Worth plant will employ approximately 500 full-time employees to support the facility."

    My own comments:

    For anybody who has had their head in the sand for the last few years Sears sold Craftsman to Stanley Black & Decker a couple years ago, but they retained the right to continue to sell tools under the Craftsman label. Sears Craftsman was not made by Stanley. They at one point after the sale started an ad campaign with the mantra of being the "original" home of Craftsman tools. Stanley sued them over it. Whether or not Sears continues to exist or continues to contract tools to be made under the Craftsman label remains to be seen. I would make sure of what I was buying for now. Stanley or Sears contract tools.
    *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

  2. #2
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    Thank you very much for this news, sounds good. I'm old enough to have a soft spot in my heart for Craftsman.

    David

  3. #3
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    Craftsman was just a label, a brand. I would think over the decades Sears would have used many different vendors like any white label scenario, i.e. the guy who made micrometers for them likely didn't make the chainsaws
    .

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mcgyver View Post
    Craftsman was just a label, a brand. I would think over the decades Sears would have used many different vendors like any white label scenario, i.e. the guy who made micrometers for them likely didn't make the chainsaws
    THIS ^^^^^^^^^^^^^

    Very true. Lowest bidder. In some cases they actually stole designs and had them made overseas, according to reports.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  5. #5
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    My old Craftsman tools I got back in the 1970's were amazing quality. Still have a lot of them. But by the time I got nutzo on a socket and broke it in the later 1990's and went in for a replacement the new stuff was as bad or worse as the cheapest of the cheap. Looking around more at the other Craftsman labeled stuff more generally it was all the same. Since then I never bothered to go back to a Sears store for any tools at all. They were dead to me.

    I've seen Craftsman branded stuff showing up at the local hardware stores and it actually LOOKS nicer than the last generations of Sears offerings. As in ratchets are solid but compact. Sockets fine lined and slim to fit tight places. Wrenches are again slim and handy feeling with decent gripping texture. Haven't bought any or used any though. But at first glance a definite step up from the last offerings that came from Sears.


    But as or more importantly it's a stab at restoring a part of a domestic industry that has been hurting for some time. So best wishes to their success.

  6. #6
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    Its my understanding that Sears contracted everything to be made, but designs came from a number of different sources including their own people. I recall a story about the guy who invented the quick release ratchet did it on his own time (before the time of contracts saying otherwise) and Sears stole it from him. I seem to recall there was a legal battle over it. However just because everything they sold was contract made doesn't mean it was all junk. Back when I was a kid most folks swore by Craftsman more than any Johnny came lately like Snap-On or Mac.

    That being said others have had good luck with contract made tools. Some of my favorite tools from the early 90s were Wal-Mart tools sold under the Popular Mechanics (tm) brand. I still have some. Another was Master Mechanic (True Value (Cotter & CO)) tools from the 1980s. Back then they were made in USA. Some folks liked them better than Challenger or Proto back then. We sold both in our hardware store. Later Master Mechanic was made in Japan and they were just as good. Some might have been better. Now I don't know. The local True Value store is a bit out of my way so I don't make it over there very often.

    On the other other hand... S-K is an example of a cheap tool that went up in quality until all of a sudden they had to go through reorganization and they dumped literally tons of tools back in the foundry with rumors of labor sabotage.
    *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

  7. #7
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    Sears was always good for no frills tools that worked on a budget. When the gimmicks started and they let quality slip that's when they went to hell. Same thing with their appliances, that was also about the time their service /parts centers started closing.
    I just need one more tool,just one!

  8. #8
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    Around 55 years ago, after purchasing some Craftsman tools from the local Sears, I came to the conclusion that they were medium quality tools with a top notch warranty. I do not abuse my tools (usually) and I still have many of those 1950s and 1960s Craftsman tools. I have also obtained warranty replacements for some of them: a particular, offset screwdriver was replaced several times (yea, clumsy bastard). I even obtained a free replacement collet for my Craftsman router which was purchased from the Sears refurbished tools bin and definitely not covered by their hand tool guarantee or any other for that matter. They may not be the best, but I have no argument with Craftsman tools.

    I was never under the impression that Craftsman hand tools or any other Craftsman labeled tools were actually manufactured by Sears or even by some single, big company called Craftsman. If nothing else, the resemblance between so many Craftsman tools and those made under other brand names was striking. And the other brand names were, even back in the 50s and 60s, numerous. In short, Sears went to whoever they could or to whoever was the lowest bidder to make the Craftsman tools. I am sure that Sears exercised some measure of quality control over the tools that had the Craftsman name on them. I am also sure that this level of QC was determined by a mix of their desire for a good reputation and the price.

    Others, like Montgomery-Ward did much the same thing. But Sears probably did it first and probably did it best for many, many years. Some are still doing it today.

    I don't know if there is any way to get a warranty replacement for a Craftsman hand tool today, but Sears did do a very good job of honoring their warranty on them for many, many decades. And I still purchase Craftsman tools in roughly equal proportions to other brands.

    PS: People like Grizzly and Harbor Freight do not make any tools either.

    As a Texan (transplanted) I applaud the addition of those jobs to my state. I hope it works out for the long term.



    Quote Originally Posted by Mcgyver View Post
    Craftsman was just a label, a brand. I would think over the decades Sears would have used many different vendors like any white label scenario, i.e. the guy who made micrometers for them likely didn't make the chainsaws
    Paul A.

    Make it fit.
    You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

  9. #9
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    Interesting article on Stanley suing Sears over Craftsman (circa March, 2019):


    https://www.chicagotribune.com/busin...307-story.html

  10. #10
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    Default One product, but a number of buyers,

    My late second wife told me that many years ago she worked in the office of a firm in Toronto which made tools. She said that those which passed all three inspections had Sears name stamped on them, those which passed two had Mastercraft ( Canadian Tire corp) stamped on them, and the rest , which only passed initial inspection remained unstamped, As she never went into the plant she could not identify what the tools were. I hope this is of interest
    Regards David Powell.

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