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Thread: Stanley Opening New Plant for Craftsman Tools in Texas

  1. #11
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    This is just my opinion. The very best combination wrenches ever made anywhere in the world were made in Chicago Illinois. From the late 40s to the mid60s Armstrong armaloy combination wrenches were the best that was available and still is today. They were numbered 11 Xx .Individual wrenches are often listed on eBay for substantial prices Sometime after the 60s they moved their plant. And their tools became very fat and clunky in my opinion. Of coarse some people think that if a tool is fat and heavy that it is a good thing to have. They wring their hands over an occasional socket that breaks. Most combination wrenches and sockets are way too thick in my opinion. I will gladly put up with a tool that occasionally splits or breaks rather than fight some big clunky heavy piece of junk. Getting back to the original posting. I think that craftsman tools have always been hit and miss. I have some beautiful old craftsman combination wrenches that are very well-defined and came out of a beautiful forging dieOthers along side of it of a different size are crude. I think most people make way too much over the lifetime guarantee of a tool I want a tool that will make me money and be a pleasure to use Edwin Dirnbeck


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  2. #12
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    Good luck to any company that is setting up to actually make things and employ people. It doesn't happen that often anymore.---Brian
    Brian Rupnow

  3. #13
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    Jan 2004
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    Missouri
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    Quote Originally Posted by Edwin Dirnbeck View Post
    ......... I think most people make way too much over the lifetime guarantee of a tool ......
    Yep. I want a tool that I will rarely if ever need the guarantee, but that is suited to the use and not too huge.

    Surprisingly, the only sockets I have split were Indestro, made in the 1970s, and bought new back then. I know I split the 3/4" on a lug nut. possibly that is because I do not generally abuse tools, I buy better quality older tools at sales, and try to use them within their limits.

    The split socket was at the time of the great impact wrench issue... When neither of the impact wrenches worked, I still had to get that nut off. The socket lost the contest, but the nut DID come off in the process, using a breaker bar with my 180lb dancing on the handle.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by brian Rupnow View Post
    Good luck to any company that is setting up to actually make things and employ people. It doesn't happen that often anymore.---Brian
    tell me about.....and for good reason. grrrrr.
    .

  5. #15
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    Jan 2003
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    On the Oil Coast,USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Edwin Dirnbeck View Post
    This is just my opinion. The very best combination wrenches ever made anywhere in the world were made in Chicago Illinois. From the late 40s to the mid60s Armstrong armaloy combination wrenches were the best that was available and still is today. They were numbered 11 Xx .Individual wrenches are often listed on eBay for substantial prices Sometime after the 60s they moved their plant. And their tools became very fat and clunky in my opinion. Of coarse some people think that if a tool is fat and heavy that it is a good thing to have. They wring their hands over an occasional socket that breaks. Most combination wrenches and sockets are way too thick in my opinion. I will gladly put up with a tool that occasionally splits or breaks rather than fight some big clunky heavy piece of junk. Getting back to the original posting. I think that craftsman tools have always been hit and miss. I have some beautiful old craftsman combination wrenches that are very well-defined and came out of a beautiful forging dieOthers along side of it of a different size are crude. I think most people make way too much over the lifetime guarantee of a tool I want a tool that will make me money and be a pleasure to use Edwin Dirnbeck


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Armstrong made some quality stuff,too bad they are gone now. I never cared much for Snap on and still don't, but they had one item I liked. They made these long, double box end 12 point wrenches that were really thin walled in the boxed end. They were very strong and would fit in places noting else would. I looked into buying another set if they still made them, $266 for 5 wrenches.....I think I'll pass.

    https://shop.snapon.com/product/Stan...F16%22)/XDH605
    I just need one more tool,just one!

  6. #16
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    Jan 2004
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    Missouri
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    Quote Originally Posted by wierdscience View Post
    Armstrong made some quality stuff,too bad they are gone now. I never cared much for Snap on and still don't, but they had one item I liked. They made these long, double box end 12 point wrenches that were really thin walled in the boxed end. They were very strong and would fit in places noting else would. I looked into buying another set if they still made them, $266 for 5 wrenches.....I think I'll pass.

    https://shop.snapon.com/product/Stan...F16%22)/XDH605
    Snap-on also makes a screwdriver that is perfect for those green european style terminal blocks, and also the clear nylon ones often used for power connections. Right size, good blade, fit perfectly and works well. I forget the number, but apparently they still make them, for about 20 bucks, Worth it, actually, and I am surprised to say it about Snap-On..
    Last edited by J Tiers; 10-09-2019 at 10:28 AM. Reason: fixed fat fingered spelling
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  7. #17
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    Jan 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Tiers View Post
    Snap-on also makes a screwdriver that is perfect for those green european style terminal blocks, and also the clear nylon ones often used for power connections. Right size, food blade, fit perfectly and works well. I forget the number, but apparently they still make them, for about 20 bucks, Worth it, actually, and I am surprised to say it about Snap-On..
    Molex? I bought some of these from the Orange Box store-

    https://www.homedepot.com/p/Husky-8-...281H/302735272

    Surprisingly good, well better than Whia anyway, just a little fatter, they also come in Torx T4-15

    https://www.homedepot.com/p/Husky-8-...381H/302735271
    I just need one more tool,just one!

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
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    Ontario, Canada
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mcgyver View Post
    tell me about.....and for good reason. grrrrr.
    Yes, and especially when anyone who has the gumption to start and run a business is called a tax cheat, a greedy capitalist, and must be taxed into oblivion in the event they do well. Doesn't really encourage an entrepreneurial spirit.

  9. #19
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    Michigan
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    Wonder if it will all be cast in China with a bit of finish work in the USA?

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Tiers View Post
    Yep. I want a tool that I will rarely if ever need the guarantee, but that is suited to the use and not too huge.
    Yessir. I don't understand the current trend to praise companies who "make it right" when it fails instead of making it right the first time.

    Of course the defense when you call a company out is usually, "Well they all make some ****ty products."
    *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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