Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 18

Thread: OT: Ikea drinking glass tested in hydraulic press

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Helsinki, Finland, Europe
    Posts
    3,661

    Default OT: Ikea drinking glass tested in hydraulic press

    Would have never guessed how much compression a simple Ikea drinking glass can handle. 22 (metric) tons or 24 short ton!

    https://youtu.be/3B2RIg7ildU?t=137

    Interesting also that the glass shrapnels instantly even on 6000fps high speed camera too fast to see any fault initiation site.

    Remember still: don't use drinking glasses when press-fitting bearings!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Chilliwack, BC, Canada
    Posts
    5,648

    Default

    Note to self.... stop using my big hydraulic press to pass around the drinks at parties....

    With the tremendous stress held in that first glass at that amount of pressure I'm not surprised that it just let go like that. Still, impressive as all blazes!

    I'm pretty sure that this Ikea glass is tempered glass. It has the look of the "shatter resistant" glasses I've seen in the past. I'm guessing that makes a difference in how it held up and the nature of the shards when it finally did let go?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    15,578

    Default

    I wonder if the first glass broke of structural failure or simply because it had uneven metal high spots connecting to it, would be nice to see the same test with something like thick gasket paper as a layer between or maybe soft aluminum if the gasket paper would not hold up and just get cut...

    might get more tons on it before it pops.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Kendal, On
    Posts
    1,800

    Default

    Shortly after I moved out on my own I was in Ikea checking out when a lady bumped into an isle display and knocked a bunch of those glasses off. They all dropped from about waist height and bounced across the floor. Not one broke. I went right over and bought a flat of them . Still have them, they're tough glasses.
    Last edited by Dan Dubeau; 10-08-2019 at 04:33 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Helsinki, Finland, Europe
    Posts
    3,661

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
    I wonder if the first glass broke of structural failure or simply because it had uneven metal high spots connecting to it, would be nice to see the same test with something like thick gasket paper as a layer between or maybe soft aluminum if the gasket paper would not hold up and just get cut...

    might get more tons on it before it pops.
    I was thinking of the same initially but then saw another video where they crushed prince ruberts(sp?) drops and they made huge dents in the steel plates in the process.
    22 tons on narrow rim like that glass and it was probably already embedding itself in the steel all around and flattening any peaks.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Chilliwack, BC, Canada
    Posts
    5,648

    Default

    His comment did mention that the glass made a mark in the anvil. And I was pretty sure I could see a depression occurring as the pressure built up.

    On the other hand the other glasses with the rounded bottoms broke pretty rapidly where the load passed at a higher angle through the glass. And a lot of the other glasses and ceramic mugs could be seen tipping a little as the load first came on. So that likely led to those items failing at lower pressure.

    It's like standing on the pop/beer can trick. If you can do it carefully and evenly enough an empty can will hold up a 200lb person.... I know because I've done it. But any unevenness in the initial standing up onto the can or the slightest dent in the side and it collapses.

    The other part of the trick is a helper taps the side of the can lightly with a pencil or something like that and the slight touch causes the sudden collapse in the aluminium can's version of that Ikea tumbler blowing up.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    15,578

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Dubeau View Post
    Shortly after I moved out on my own I was in Ikea checking out when a lady bumped into an isle display and knocked a bunch of those glasses off. They all dropped from about waist height and bounced across the floor. Not one broke. I went right over and bought a flat of them . Still have them, they're tough glasses.
    Funny story lol she probably was the sales rep. and it's one of their routines lol

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Kendal, On
    Posts
    1,800

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
    Funny story lol she probably was the sales rep. and it's one of their routines lol
    I've thought that too. Her only job was to come around every hour and bump a couple glasses onto the floor lol.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,993

    Default

    Perfect for pounding shots of mercury.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    On the Oil Coast,USA
    Posts
    19,685

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
    I wonder if the first glass broke of structural failure or simply because it had uneven metal high spots connecting to it, would be nice to see the same test with something like thick gasket paper as a layer between or maybe soft aluminum if the gasket paper would not hold up and just get cut...

    might get more tons on it before it pops.
    This, If the press had a self adjusting pad like the pad on a C-clamp on the top along with a dense cushion like you say,maybe HDPE or something the result would probably be even higher tonnage.

    I think the uneven loading explains the variance in the first two results even though the glasses are virtually identical in shape.
    I just need one more tool,just one!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •