Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 22

Thread: sharpening systems.

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    durban s africa
    Posts
    1,521

    Default

    I have four bench grinders and all dont run smoothly. I dont know if you can expect ball racer bearings to work smoothly. What type of spindle bearings would do the job.
    Or is it more likely a wheel problem. I have machined better inner and outer washers so thats not the issue.
    With respect to the HH base and stand. I noticed he suggests making the legs from 1/4 inch to 3mm. It would seem to make it less rigid. He mentions they make for easier adjustment.

    I wonder if it would not be a better way to use linear bearings on shafts for smoother action.
    Has anything else come up that doesnt involve fancy complicated setups like the quorn.
    Fixerup. Are the plans easy to follow and do they give you plans for the holders or do you have to buy these.

    Lets say you wanted to grind odd angles like 20 degrees into a piece of square hss to make a cutter or 60 degrees for example. What kind of graduation fixture could be used that is compact and easy to use.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Chilliwack, B.C.
    Posts
    11,831

    Default

    One of the first things that came to me was how well does that design handle the grindings- other than that I like it.
    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Chilliwack, BC, Canada
    Posts
    5,648

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by darryl View Post
    One of the first things that came to me was how well does that design handle the grindings- other than that I like it.
    One of the setups I made used a square tube within a square tube. That was pretty well a disaster for grinding dust locking things up. It isn't a sliding fit in use, just an adjustment. But next time I'd go for a piece of angle on it's side and the adjustable shaft be some square tube or bar which is clamped into the "V" of the angle. That way when it's loose to move it a quick rattle of the thing and all the dust would fall clear.

    Slotted sliding arms as shown in the Acute and HH tables would certainly need to be cleaned before each sliding adjustment. If one wanted an adjustable height as well as adjustable angle a better design would be needed. For that reason my other shop made rest is a simple one that uses modified house door hinges and simple pivoting shafts. The grit gets between the arm and the end of the hinge but it does not stop the arm from moving easily and in fact aids with the locking up with less torque. And I simply get my different angles by altering the angle of the platform and then pivot in or out to set the spacing. If I were to do an Acute setup I'd likely stick with that over their sliding slotted arms which would need frequent cleaning or lots of space for grit to not plug things up.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    663

    Default

    I replaced both wheels on my 8" bench grinder about a year ago, and it damn near sent itself into orbit. With only the fine white wheel it balanced perfectly, but with the coarse grey wheel ( a reputable German company's product) fitted too, it was a shocker.
    I turned up new arbors and washers to no avail, so finally got a replacement wheel, which improved the imbalance to the point where I can live with it. But it would not be good enough for any precision grinding unless I removed the coarse wheel.
    I am glad to learn from this thread that I'm not alone.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
    Posts
    3,126

    Default

    Concerning balancing grinder wheels, metalmagpie once wrote an excellent article on the subject.

    http://www.nwnative.us/Grant/shop%20...ble/balancing/

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    200

    Default

    Bench grinders can and should run smoothly. My fleet consists of 3 old Craftsman block grinders so they're pretty good quality but there is nothing too special here. The first test for sure should be to run any grinder without wheels to see if there is vibration. Also inspect shaft runout and whatever feature interfaces with the wheel (shoulder, snap ring, etc). I had a HF grinder that the shoulder that the inner washer went up against was a little buggered and the washer wasn't a real good fit on the shaft. I gave that one away eventually rather than fussing with it.

    I was fortunate to receive some older grinder wheels with the grinders I now have, and those work fine (pretty darn smooth) without any balancing or heavy dressing. They fit the shafts pretty well and run true. Fitting the shaft snug with an appropriate bushing and getting the wheels true running are the next steps. Dress as necessary. Finally, balancing as shown in Arcanes link really works. I have found my grinders bearings are loose enough that you can do this right on the grinder. I haven't needed to do this to a bench grinding wheel yet, but I have implemented the very same fix to a greater extent on a newer 8" wire brush on my big grinder. Even bolted to the floor that wire wheel would shake the dickens out of the grinder and everything around until I made an offset washer with a bunch of weld buildup on one edge.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Ontario,Canada
    Posts
    79

    Default

    Hi Plunger,
    Yes the plans are easy to follow and they do include tool holder blank drawings. The only reason I purchase the square lathe tool holder and the angle setting gauge, they would of been a pain for me to make.
    Cheers!
    Phil

  8. #18

    Default

    A few years ago I bought an 8" benchgrinder from KBC . It was on sale for $ 59.00.

    It is so smooth and balanced I can hardly believe it. After shutting it off it takes about 10 minutes to stop turning.

    To get such a well balanced China made grinder is something else. Well, I had to get lucky sometime.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    West coast of Canada
    Posts
    687

    Default

    On my cheap Chinese/ Grizzly grinder the shoulder for the inner wheel washers was very shallow. I machines up some new washers with a close fitting step in the bore so they would reach past the shoulder.
    I also made new outer washers with a bore that is a close fit on the OD of the threads. The next step was to make some pipe spacers that were about the same length as the width of the stones. I then took the armature out of the grinder and set it up in the lathe with the washer, spacers and nut torqued up. I took a very light cuts off the inner face of the washers where they would make contact with the grinding wheel. I also marked the position of the inner washers in relation to the armature so I could be sure to assemble the grinder with them in the same place as they were machined. I ended up with quit smooth straight running wheels.
    Larry

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    yuma az
    Posts
    136

    Default Village press carries some eccentric engineering stuff

    I have also been eyeing this setup for awhile especially for the ability to sharpen endmills which would be sweet especially if it could be scaled up to do larger endmills. one thing I found while searching and not wanting to pay for shipping from Australia is that village press publications carries some of their stuff for sale here in the states .I know they stock tool holders not sure what else may be worth checking out https://secure.villagepress.com/stor...list/group/414

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •