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Cheaper TTS tool holders?

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  • Cheaper TTS tool holders?

    My R8 ATC spindle came in for my Taig, I can now use TTS holders. Ordered a Tormach ER16 holder, but with shipping, pretty expensive for just one tool. Most of my endmills are 1/8th.
    Maybe I'll make my own holders, setscrew style.

  • #2
    There used to be import clones on ebay. I bought a bunch and they were excellent quality and less than half the price of Tormach holders. Don't know if they are still available but would guess so. They were listed as 3/4 shank ER holders , TTS not mentioned prob due to patents. They are identical.

    Found a example https://www.ebay.com/itm/3-4-ER20-1-...UAAOSws-hewTX0
    Last edited by Sparky_NY; 06-06-2020, 03:18 PM.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Sparky_NY View Post
      There used to be import clones on ebay. I bought a bunch and they were excellent quality and less than half the price of Tormach holders. Don't know if they are still available but would guess so. They were listed as 3/4 shank ER holders , TTS not mentioned prob due to patents. They are identical.

      Found a example https://www.ebay.com/itm/3-4-ER20-1-...UAAOSws-hewTX0
      Ok, ordered 4 ER20's, hopefully the runout is good.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by RB211 View Post

        Ok, ordered 4 ER20's, hopefully the runout is good.
        Quality of the ones I got was outstanding. Finding good low runout collets may be the trick.

        Comment


        • #5
          Maybe a bit late but I made my own shrink fit TTS holders some time ago. Used a 3/4 ground chrome rod. Shrink fitted a steel collar with high interference fit (0.05mm), bored in the mill spindle for min TIR (dialed the collet for the best position first). Diameter is 0.01 thiner for small endmills and 0.02 for large ones. Take into account the real diameter of the endmills, a 4mm one measures 3.99, so the bore is 3.98mm.

          I use a torch to load and unload the endmills and they work like charm. Only for carbide though, and don't let your spindle heat too much.

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          • #6
            If you have a lathe and are half good, or atleast take your time and are careful you can make perfectly acceptable TTS style) tool holders yourself. The Tormach TC tap holders do cost a bit, and they didn't have end mill holders for some of the end mills I wanted to hold or with the reach I needed. The only real key to making decent tool holders is to get the shank spot on and get it concentric with the bore which should be bored then reamed to final size.

            At one time some time ago there was an importer selling TTS tool holders on Ebay, but I think they got in trouble. I think TTS is a registered trademark of Tormach. Novakon makes a tool holder similar to the TTS too holder, but I think they call them QTC tool holders.

            Considering how affordable the standard TTS tool holders are from Tormach its pretty hard to beat them buy much. I've made end mill holders, extended endmill holders, and TC tap holders, but ER Collet chucks, regular endmill holders, and JT adapters I just buy from Tormach. Of all the quick change toolholders I have seen TTS style holders are among the most affordable.

            Something that might be handy is a press fit collar Tormach sells. You can turn any 3/4 shank tool into a TTS tool in half a minute. I've got several in my tool rack done this way as well as my home made TTS style holders. Dovetail, t-slot, mini face mill, etc.

            I've also been considering making some stubby endmill holders so I can fully expose the flute on cheap weldon end mills. Mostly I use collet chuck holders for everything important, but I'm not after anything high precision with the cheap mills anyway.
            *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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            • #7
              I would add that while many people do it, set screw holders really are not recommended for carbide endmills with no weldon flat.

              Ages ago when I was using wood routers for spindles I made blind hole 1/4-1/8 adapters with a 3/8 collar with a set screw for 1/8 shank tools using my crappy little 7x10 Harbor Freight mini lathe. They worked. My tool holders had less run out than the wood router usually. LOL.
              *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

              Comment


              • #8
                Now this one looks like a deal if the parts are good. https://www.ebay.com/itm/3pcs-3-4-ER...2d7f86ab3b661f\

                If I could find some in ER16 I'd be even more tempted to try them.
                *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Bob La Londe View Post
                  I would add that while many people do it, set screw holders really are not recommended for carbide endmills with no weldon flat.
                  How else would you do it?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by elf View Post

                    How else would you do it?
                    Collets or collet chucks. I have very few tools in set screw holders. For my 24K RPM machines I have ZERO (0) tools in set screw holders.
                    *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I was hoping you had a solution for this type of cutting head:
                      Click image for larger version

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by elf View Post
                        I was hoping you had a solution for this type of cutting head:
                        Click image for larger version

Name:	CutterHead.JPG
Views:	123
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ID:	1899383
                        Sure. You use your diamond wheel in your TC, D-Bit, or surface grinder to put a flat on your carbide tool.
                        *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by elf View Post

                          How else would you do it?
                          I use set screw holders on the Tormach for all my solid carbide and insert carbide endmills - both roughers and finishers. And not a single one has a flat on it. Fine in tool steel, stainless, and aluminium - I'll get TTS pullout waaaaaaaay before I get any slippage, and runout is not a problem either. On the Tormach it's a complete non issue. For a high-speed or high power machine I'd probably approach it quite differently though.
                          My ER holders are reserved for cutters below 5mm - mainly 2mm/3mm sizes, and thread mills.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Peter N View Post

                            I use set screw holders on the Tormach for all my solid carbide and insert carbide endmills - both roughers and finishers. And not a single one has a flat on it. Fine in tool steel, stainless, and aluminium - I'll get TTS pullout waaaaaaaay before I get any slippage, and runout is not a problem either. On the Tormach it's a complete non issue. For a high-speed or high power machine I'd probably approach it quite differently though.
                            My ER holders are reserved for cutters below 5mm - mainly 2mm/3mm sizes, and thread mills.

                            You thread mill on the Tormach? I started to, but I have to thread a lot of holes. Finished out a mold yesterday with 22 10-32 threaded holes using a home made TC tapper. (I have a Tormach TC tapper also). Its a lot faster tapping at 500 RPM than it is thread milling at 5120. For blind holes If I can just drill it a little deeper and use a spiral flute tap I'll do that before I thread mill. I do have my tapping recipe worked out pretty well. I never get more than about 1-2 threads over tap, and about the same on spring back. I plan 3 threads clearance and its golden. I did take the time to dial my rpm in as close as I could when programmed at 500 RPM. It fluctuates about 1 to 1.2 RPM total range according to my optical tach. The only time I thread mill on the Tormach is if I have to thread a blind hole all the way to the bottom, if I don't have a machine tap that size, or if it takes to much power to drive the tap. I am really fond of the Rogue Systems Inc single form thread mills, but I hate having to search Ebay for some sizes because he doesn't have them all listed on his website.

                            Now on the little 24000rpm machines I thread mill exclusively, but its way faster, and they don't have any torque for things like tapping below 8000rpm. At 24000 rpm they thread mil holes as fast as the Tormach taps them.

                            Yeah I definitely have experienced TTS pullout with 1/2 inch 12-13mm tools trying to get near peak horsepower material removal. I reduced that by increasing the spring stack. Then I had to bump the air pressure to release the tool.
                            *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I guess I should add that I can see for coarse pitches the time difference might not be as pronounced.
                              *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

                              Comment

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