Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Cheaper TTS tool holders?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Bob La Londe
    replied
    Originally posted by RB211 View Post
    At this point, suppose I'll start buying the ER16's from Tormach again. I have one of their holders and it is NICE quality.
    I almost wish they had an ER11 version for the smaller shank cutters.

    Leave a comment:


  • RB211
    replied
    At this point, suppose I'll start buying the ER16's from Tormach again. I have one of their holders and it is NICE quality.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sparky_NY
    replied
    Originally posted by RB211 View Post
    The cheaper TTS holders are not hardened...
    The cheap ebay ones I got were indeed hardend, and ground. The quality was quite impressive. Of course, like many things from china, quality can vary all over the map. The seller I bought from actually manufactured the holders themselves. The seller was "bsello168" no idea if he is still selling on ebay or not, it was several years ago I bought them.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob La Londe
    replied
    Fortunately as I mentioned back in post #6 "Considering how affordable the standard TTS tool holders are from Tormach its pretty hard to beat them by much."

    Actually as tool holders go (in the grand scheme of all the different tool holders out there) they are one of the cheaper tool holders available. Also quite a wide range from ER16 to ER32, variety of set screw holders, modular tooling, arbors for a variety of applications, and even different TC tappers. Not all are as cheap as their basic end mill holders, but compared to many other types of tool holders out there they are quite affordable. I know I'm starting to sound like a Tormach fanboy, but I really am not. It just makes financial sense, and they ship from the USA. Typically within a day or two.
    Last edited by Bob La Londe; 10-08-2020, 11:41 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • RB211
    replied
    The cheaper TTS holders are not hardened...

    Leave a comment:


  • Peter N
    replied
    Click image for larger version

Name:	Fixture plate.jpg
Views:	81
Size:	226.3 KB
ID:	1900334 This was all thread-milled, about 90-off M8 holes to turn an old piece of tooling plate into a fixture plate.
    Can't remember the exact time, but thread-milling the whole lot was less than 5 minutes

    Click image for larger version  Name:	fetch?photoid=1849631&type=thumb.jpg Views:	4 Size:	4.2 KB ID:	1900330
    Last edited by Peter N; 09-19-2020, 01:19 PM. Reason: Edit for larger pic

    Leave a comment:


  • Peter N
    replied
    Originally posted by Bob La Londe View Post
    You thread mill on the Tormach? I started to, but I have to thread a lot of holes.
    I do, but I use one of these instead of those stupid single point sloooooow things. Takes just seconds with these, but I obviously have to buy several with different pitches.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	threadmill.jpg
Views:	86
Size:	20.9 KB
ID:	1900315

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob La Londe
    replied
    I guess I should add that I can see for coarse pitches the time difference might not be as pronounced.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob La Londe
    replied
    Originally posted by Peter N View Post

    I use set screw holders on the Tormach for all my solid carbide and insert carbide endmills - both roughers and finishers. And not a single one has a flat on it. Fine in tool steel, stainless, and aluminium - I'll get TTS pullout waaaaaaaay before I get any slippage, and runout is not a problem either. On the Tormach it's a complete non issue. For a high-speed or high power machine I'd probably approach it quite differently though.
    My ER holders are reserved for cutters below 5mm - mainly 2mm/3mm sizes, and thread mills.

    You thread mill on the Tormach? I started to, but I have to thread a lot of holes. Finished out a mold yesterday with 22 10-32 threaded holes using a home made TC tapper. (I have a Tormach TC tapper also). Its a lot faster tapping at 500 RPM than it is thread milling at 5120. For blind holes If I can just drill it a little deeper and use a spiral flute tap I'll do that before I thread mill. I do have my tapping recipe worked out pretty well. I never get more than about 1-2 threads over tap, and about the same on spring back. I plan 3 threads clearance and its golden. I did take the time to dial my rpm in as close as I could when programmed at 500 RPM. It fluctuates about 1 to 1.2 RPM total range according to my optical tach. The only time I thread mill on the Tormach is if I have to thread a blind hole all the way to the bottom, if I don't have a machine tap that size, or if it takes to much power to drive the tap. I am really fond of the Rogue Systems Inc single form thread mills, but I hate having to search Ebay for some sizes because he doesn't have them all listed on his website.

    Now on the little 24000rpm machines I thread mill exclusively, but its way faster, and they don't have any torque for things like tapping below 8000rpm. At 24000 rpm they thread mil holes as fast as the Tormach taps them.

    Yeah I definitely have experienced TTS pullout with 1/2 inch 12-13mm tools trying to get near peak horsepower material removal. I reduced that by increasing the spring stack. Then I had to bump the air pressure to release the tool.

    Leave a comment:


  • Peter N
    replied
    Originally posted by elf View Post

    How else would you do it?
    I use set screw holders on the Tormach for all my solid carbide and insert carbide endmills - both roughers and finishers. And not a single one has a flat on it. Fine in tool steel, stainless, and aluminium - I'll get TTS pullout waaaaaaaay before I get any slippage, and runout is not a problem either. On the Tormach it's a complete non issue. For a high-speed or high power machine I'd probably approach it quite differently though.
    My ER holders are reserved for cutters below 5mm - mainly 2mm/3mm sizes, and thread mills.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob La Londe
    replied
    Originally posted by elf View Post
    I was hoping you had a solution for this type of cutting head:
    Click image for larger version

Name:	CutterHead.JPG
Views:	123
Size:	30.3 KB
ID:	1899383
    Sure. You use your diamond wheel in your TC, D-Bit, or surface grinder to put a flat on your carbide tool.

    Leave a comment:


  • elf
    replied
    I was hoping you had a solution for this type of cutting head:
    Click image for larger version

Name:	CutterHead.JPG
Views:	123
Size:	30.3 KB
ID:	1899383

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob La Londe
    replied
    Originally posted by elf View Post

    How else would you do it?
    Collets or collet chucks. I have very few tools in set screw holders. For my 24K RPM machines I have ZERO (0) tools in set screw holders.

    Leave a comment:


  • elf
    replied
    Originally posted by Bob La Londe View Post
    I would add that while many people do it, set screw holders really are not recommended for carbide endmills with no weldon flat.
    How else would you do it?

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob La Londe
    replied
    Now this one looks like a deal if the parts are good. https://www.ebay.com/itm/3pcs-3-4-ER...2d7f86ab3b661f\

    If I could find some in ER16 I'd be even more tempted to try them.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X