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OT: 3d Printer given to me

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  • OT: 3d Printer given to me

    Oldest son gave me his Prusa i3 MK2S printer, works fine, has Raspberry Pi computer & camera as well as a reel of PET and PLA filament. Lots of fun. He found it cheaper to simply upgrade to the new MK3 version than to buy the upgraded components separately. Little bit of a learning curve for me, being used to removing rather than adding material to a work project.

    Dan
    Attached Files
    Salem, Oregon

  • #2
    My son has a resin printer. I've had him print a couple projects for me. Haven't had any experience with filament printers.
    *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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    • #3
      Looks like someone can make pistol grips that fit now 😀

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      • #4
        Originally posted by elf View Post
        Looks like someone can make pistol grips that fit now 😀
        Wrong Danl. I'm Danlb

        And I did consider that.
        At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

        Location: SF East Bay.

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        • #5
          I stopped reading after the first four letters 😶 I have seen a few nice grips designed in Fusion 360 for printing.

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          • #6
            My son showed me one thing these printers can do that do not look like they would be easy to make in many of our hobby machine shops out of metal: rectangular holes in a circular shape that hold zip ties. My brother came over the next day and said a well equipped EDM should be able to make these. Click image for larger version

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            I don't know anything about EDM systems, but they must be very flexible and powerful to be able to make enclosed rectangular holes like this.

            Dan
            Salem, Oregon

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            • #7
              That is a neat thing to be able to do, but like every machining operation, there are always ways to do what you NEED to do. If I were doing that in my garage, I'd either a) use screws instead of zip ties or b) run the zip ties outside the tube and make a cover for the zipties. If I had the ability to do casting there are ways to make that work too.

              They did it that way because they could. I'd be more impressed if the zip tie was integral to the part.

              Daniel B.
              At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

              Location: SF East Bay.

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              • #8
                I agree. These things can print gears inside of total enclosures, but, being PLA or PET plastic, they don't compare to steel or cast, machined gears.

                Another way I thought of doing this in metal was simply making an end cap for it, after cutting the curved slot on my RT. Your way sounds much easier.

                Dan
                Salem, Oregon

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                • #9
                  Here's one you would have a hard time doing with subtractive machining

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by elf View Post
                    Here's one you would have a hard time doing with subtractive machining
                    For those that did not follow the link, it's a 2 inch tall Yoda. Several places that are undercut. Ironically, most 3D printers can't make that without scaffolds and supports for things like the ears that stick out into mid air. The ironic part is that the supports have to be manually removed through a subtractive machining process. Knife, scissors, pliers, nippers etc.

                    If making that I'd probably make it in three pieces. Head, Body, Stand. That would eliminate the deep curved undercutting.

                    Dan
                    At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

                    Location: SF East Bay.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by danlb View Post
                      The ironic part is that the supports have to be manually removed through a subtractive machining process. Knife, scissors, pliers, nippers etc.
                      Not quite accurate. While you might need extra tools to remove supports, in general if you need tools to remove supports then theres something wrong with your print settings. Dunno that you could really call it a subtractive machining operation, given that you're not removing stock so much as separate 2 pieces. Bout as much machining as taking stock out of a vise, if your supports are done correctly, least with FDM processes.

                      SLA supports are a different story, those are a bitch to get the supports off

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