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Stepper Motor for Power Feed

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  • Stepper Motor for Power Feed

    Can some one help me with a stepper to use for power feed and all components needed. This would be used on a big red HF Mill/Drill machine
    Thanks

  • #2
    Lot's of users here http://www.cnczone.com/forums/
    Max.

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    • #3
      Thanks Max can you point to the thread relating to it.

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      • #4
        A question along these lines comes up on each machining forum a couple of times a year. It is followed by various suggestions of increasing complexity. I've not seen anyone come back saying they have taken the advise and done a conversion. From this I conclude that either people realise that while it seems a great idea in practice it is far easier and cheaper to use a DC motor like a windscreen wiper one or instead they go the whole hog and convert totally to cnc.

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        • #5
          BAZ
          I have 12v motors to do that with but i am concerned they don't have the torque for the resistance of the cutter besides the gears in the gearboxes attached to the motor are plastic and most times the gear shaft is only supported on the motor end witch will strip the gear. I am leaning toward a stepper motor

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          • #6
            Have a look at this https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gyaHoJc1I9s to get an idea of the size of motor relative to your mill and a simple mounting and pulley drive. Probably around 470ozin. Then look on ebay for a stand alone single motor driver board delivering about 6amps to be on the safe side, and a psu to match. These drivers have 3 inputs - enable is obvious, direction is just a 1k resistor and switch between +5v and 0v, so you are left with needing a pulse train on the third input. This is where people go bonkers and suggest some single board computer just to make pulses. Far simpler is a 12v motor and a model train controller to set speed of a rotating disc with holes and a photocell to provide the pulses.

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            • #7
              Thanks Baz
              I am not building CNC i like to some day. What i am looking for is simply a stepper to run the Y axis with a feed speed setting and a fast speed lever

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              • #8
                I only pointed you to the cnc video to see the size of the motor and how to mount it. A stepper motor needs a driver unless you are into electronics enough to know how else to do it and I explained the simplest method to make the necessary pulses.

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                • #9
                  Go to http://schmalzhaus.com/EasyDriver/Ex...rExamples.html I'm about to build example # 5. I'm waiting for the 32bit Arduino compatable boards.
                  As mentioned you should get a smoother running stepper with the 32bit board.
                  With stepper controllers like these getting high speeds is not easy. You need ramping, it's in software like Mach3 or Linuxcnc and many others.
                  The Easydrivers mentioned by Schmalzhaus go to 4.4 amps only but you can use any stepperdriver you want.
                  Baz: As for input to enable, some need it and some don't and some usermanuals tell you it's needed but it's wrong. I had that problem recently and I was ready to pull my hair out.

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                  • #10
                    john
                    In that case would i be better of to build a all CNC. I have about 4 desktop computers i could use, my concern is my shop is not heated in the winter if i am not working in it also the humidity i am concerned about with the constant temperature changes do you think the conditions will harm the electronics and computer.

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                    • #11
                      Oldish thread.... but......

                      If the DC motor would not have the torque, a stepper to do the job will be expensive.

                      The stepper is usually not as large a reduction as what the DC motor can be, so it needs a good deal of torque.

                      A wiper motor, for instance, has usually got a worm on the motor shaft, and a biggish gear meshing with the worm. The reduction can be in excess of 60:1, although it might be less.
                      CNC machines only go through the motions

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