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  • #16

    I have the HF version and I'm very pleased with it. I think it's an exceptionally capable little work horse. I give it a 3 thumbs up.

    -3Ph

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    • #17
      I have the HF 4 x 6 and it works great, cuts flat late up to 5" and steel bar 1" thick also used it to cut down my reamer shanks I don't use the adjustment spring anymore just hold the saw by hand and apply preasure as needed and it cuts through very easily.

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      • #18
        <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by wierdscience:


        I can highly recomend adding a small air cylinder and needle valve for a variable rate down feed in place of the spring they use from the factory.Addding this will make it perform like a $2000+ saw.[/B]</font>
        Darin, more info please. My friend Andy (a notorious lurker ) will be interested. I assume that the air cylinder prevents the blades from falling off and makes them last longer.
        To invent, you need a good imagination - and a pile of junk. Thomas A. Edison

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        • #19
          I purchased exactly that saw in December from Bust Bee in Toronto. It is one of the best things you could spend the $225 on period. It's actually fairly well made.

          Keep the blade tight and clean off the wheels and the blade will stay one much better.

          I'm looking at making a oil cylinder/needle valve down feed instead of the spring to smooth things out.

          Get 2 bi-metal blades right away, if you break the first one you won't want to go back to the stock blade. I also picked up a large toothed blade for speeding up the cuts on big thick aluminum blocks.

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          • #20
            evan- buy one. you will like having it.
            I would buy the best one you can- personally, I think the Jet is a little better, but in Canada your choices may be different. Somebody mentioned the swivel model- I have a friend who is a professional blacksmith, a couple of guys in the shop every day, teaches classes, and he swears by his grizzly swivel model. He has had it for at least 3 years now.
            here is another site that has a lot of info on tuning and improving these saws.
            http://www.tinyisland.com/4x6bsFAQ.html
            Good blades are essential- the crummiest saw will work 5 times as well with a good bimetal Starrett or Lenox blade.

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            • #21
              Ok, it's settled. Sounds like a good buy. Now I just have to find a way to get it shipped up here that doesn't cost more than the saw. Freightways want $86.00.
              Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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              • #22
                I have the clarke 4x6, all the same saws, got it from tractor supply for 179$
                Only problem I have noticed that when cutting small stock, the blade tapers in about .020 to .030 in from the top to the bottom. I think it is from the blade flexing as the supports dont extend out far enough for the small stuff. I should get a new blade, and re-examine the blade tension. Also I need to fix the motor mount, the saw slid out from underneath itself and hit the motor hard bending the motor mount like tin foil, lol.

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                • #23
                  Hello Evan,
                  I have one that looks just like that one.
                  Its one of the best things that I have bought for my shop. They work very well and
                  you will like the precision with which they cut, not to mention the relief that your arm will feel.
                  Chuck

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                  • #24
                    Evan -

                    I bought mine from McMaster-Carr about three years ago. It turned out to be a JET. The stand is a bit flimsy as mentioned above, but not bad enough for me to change it. I have made vise jaw extensions and fitted a bar where the blade comes down so that small pieces can be supported. I also frequently use one of those cheap angle vises that came with my mill/drill to hold work for interrupted cuts - lets you set up so the saw blade ends at the angle you want to stop at.

                    Starret blades are great!

                    I drilled a drain hole for the gear box, installed a drain valve and a fill port recently when, for the first time, I checked and changed the gear oil (even though it looked spotless.)

                    Recently cut a 7"x8" rectangle from an 8"x12"x3/8" steel plate. You can do that by removing the vise jaws.

                    Want to sell me a computer?

                    ------------------

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                    • #25
                      What everyone said. The only problem is that the plastic cover for the pulley assembly doesn't close properly but I'm sure you can improvise a solution. Best bang for the buck of all the machines that I've bought.

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                      • #26
                        <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by wierdscience:
                        They have been impoting those saws for 25 years or better,I have customers which have had no problems for 10 years or better.The only thing to watch is the lube in the gearbox,sometimes Won Hung Lo forgets to fill them with oil

                        I can highly recomend adding a small air cylinder and needle valve for a variable rate down feed in place of the spring they use from the factory.Addding this will make it perform like a $2000+ saw.
                        </font>
                        I have the same saw & a spare air cylinder, with about a 4" stroke. Has anybody done this conversion and would like to post some images or some sketches? It sounds like a great idea and there's enough people out there that could benefit from the conversion!

                        Ed Pacenka

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                        • #27
                          I was thinking about that my self. I have a boxfull of stubby 4" long with 4" stroke gas springs, most of which have leaked out a long time ago. They were originally intended to support about 120 lbs and would probably work perfectly. I'll have to see if I can find them. I might even be persuaded to part with a few.
                          Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                          • #28
                            <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by G.A. Ewen:
                            Darin, more info please. My friend Andy (a notorious lurker ) will be interested. I assume that the air cylinder prevents the blades from falling off and makes them last longer.</font>
                            Does nothing for the tracking/blade falling off thing except nip it in the bud by allowing decreased blade tension.
                            All it does is replace the feed tension spring.You need a 8-10" stroke cylinder,double acting,or you can fit a single acting cylinder with a tee and a check valve.
                            All that is needed is to connect the two ports of the cylinder together with the needle valve in the middle.The valve allows you to meter the flow of air from one side of the piston to the other.So what you end up with is instead of the blade being loaded up by the spring you can set the feed rate so the blade is cutting effeciently,but not loading the blade down.
                            I set my saws so the blade tracks about 1/32" above the backup rollers on the guides.When the cut starts I set the feed so that the blade just starts to kiss the roller,not ride on it.If it rides it will form a burr on the back edge of the blade and the burr is were the cracks and tracking problems start.

                            Like I said above you can use a single acting cylinder if thats what you have,just connect to the base with a pipe tee,connect the needle valve to the trunk of the tee and the check valve to the branch.plumb the check so when you lift the saw head for the next cut,it opens and allows the cylinder to fill with air,then blocks when you drop the head and start the cut.This setup also saves your needle valve setting between cuts.An indicator dial will do the same on the double acting setup.

                            I have a larger Grizzly saw with the same setup from the factory on it.It really makes things nice.I can hold .015" over a 12" wide piece cut after cut.

                            I just need one more tool,just one!

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                            • #29
                              Yep, same things. I love my little HF saw. The only problem I had was the gasket on the gear box developed a problem and drained a bunch of oil when I tilted it up. A little instant gasket goo and all was better.

                              I also need to replace the flimsy base and include a catch pan and flood coolant for chip clearance. With the cylinder to replace the spring it would be perfect. I'm always amazed at the quality of the finish when I cut a piece of bar stock. Maybe a degree of taper out of the box.

                              Kevin

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                              • #30
                                Hi Evan,

                                I have one like that too. As others stated the stand is flimsy so I spot welded a angle iron frame under the sheet metal stand. Also those little wheels are a joke but easy to remedy if you like. The motor is your typical chinese type so you don't want to push them to hard. Gets hot pretty quick but not a real problem as you don't want to push it to hard to save blade life any way. I wore out about three blades so far and haven't had any problems. Also can tilt the saw straight up so I use it lots to cut freehand.

                                brent

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