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  • Evan
    replied
    The bandsaw arrived at my wife's shop this morning. We even are having reasonable weather (around freezing) so I get to play with my new toy this weekend. Gee, I like new tools.

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  • Buckshot
    replied
    ...........I don't know if it's national or not, but Harbor Frieght has these on sale for $159. I'd heard that the legs were flimsy but other then that it was mostly positive. I went to the local HF store and looked at the display model.

    I bought one and when I got it home and unpacked I was impressed. Yes, the legs are flimsy but easily stiffened up. I cut a piece of 3/4" plywood inside for a shelf extending from the front to back legs which made a huge difference. Tne I used some tech screws to attach cheap 90* brackets across the hinged side of the legs.

    What impressed me was was the cast iron base and arm. The castings were very sharp and well done. They sure didn't look like they'd been cast in a mould in the ground! The vise base on the bed is surface ground or flycut nicely and the vise jaws are substantialy cast. The moveable jaw is moved via a 3/4" ACME screw.

    It didn't take too long to get the blade rollers aligned. They supply a useable but very cheap stamped sheet metal wrench to adjust the eccentric bolts behind the rollers.

    I made a slotted plate to clamp to the blade guard to sandwich in a piece of 1/4" thick way felt as a blade wiper. To catch the cuttings I stuck a 14x20" cookie baking sheet up under the base, then with tech screws attached a strip of 1/8x1" alum under it from front to back to hold it in place. You can slide the cookie sheet out to clean it. Does a good job of catching all the fines.

    I've never owned a bandsaw before so blade tension and arm pressure was all experimental for my part. I adjusted the downward arm pressure so it would definately shut off the saw when the piece was cut, and blade tension was set a half a turn beyond blade slipping.

    When I got it all set up I cut a 36" bar of 7/8-14 althread into 2.5" pieces for push through bullet sizers and then a piece of 1x1" keystock into 1.5" pieces to make into 'T' nuts.

    It did all the cutting without a whimper. As a previous poster mentioned, the motor did get hot and the gearbox got warm (I checked, it WAS full of gearlube :-). It might have been my imagination but it did seem as though the supplied blade might have been getting slower about cutting through the stock there toward the end. But for a $6 (that's what the spares cost I bought) blade I guess it did okay.

    I'm glad I went ahead and bought it. It appears to be a VERY good buy for a home user like me.

    Best,
    Rick

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  • quasi
    replied
    they are worth the little bit of money that they cost, I have worn out 2. The gears in the gear box will wear severly if used heavily or mine did. They are a pretty good tool for hobby use, but I like my Rockwell 7v better.

    One thing I really miss about these little saws is the ability of them to convert to a vericall band saw. I found this very usefull a lot of times. I beleive the author Terry Sexton wrote an article in either HSM or MW a while ago on his expieriences with tiwanese ( now meaning chineze) machine tools. Included in this article was a review of his expieriences with these saws, he had gearbox problems also.

    I should point out that both of mine and I beleive Mr Sextons also were made in Tiwan, not China. Maybe the chinese ones have better gearboxes.

    Again, these saws are well worth the money, especially in Western Canada where good used machine tools are very rare. If I had not lucked into a great deal on my rockwell, I would be using my third one of these saws.

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  • Joel
    replied
    No conspiracy here, they are just that handy. This is one of the few tools that everyone seems to universally agree are invaluable. Considering their low cost, there is no reason NOT to have one, as they will quickly pay for themselves in several ways.

    Eventually the day will come where you need your trusty old hacksaw again, and a rather large smile will likely cross your face when you pick it up and remember the days…


    Now where is the $5.00 you promised?

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  • Evan
    replied
    I just ordered one. Should be here Fri or Mon. BTW, my wife is suspecting a conspiracy on the part of all you guys with all these glowing reports of what a great deal this saw is. Thanks

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  • Evan
    replied
    Making a hydraulic dashpot should be a simple exercise. It doesn't matter a bit if the piston seal leaks a little inside the cylinder and the shaft seal can be placed pointing up so it won't leak. A one way valve can be put in the piston face with a piece of shim stock to facilitate reset. A short piece of 1.5" DOM tube with a couple of aluminum end blocks and some allthread tie rods shouldn't cost much. That will be one of my first projects for it.

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  • Radmachine
    replied
    Evan, I copied a reply someone gave about mounting a double acting air cylinder on one of these saws. It was posted 02-02-2004 on this BBS. Check out:
    http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//Fo...ML/005271.html

    Richard Montgomery
    Robert, LA

    Leave a comment:


  • lynnl
    replied
    Mine's a Jet, bought locally for about $260, and frankly the stand (4 legs of tapering angle .100" thick ...don't what gauge that'd be) was very rigid in my opinion. I added a shelf near the bottom and used angle steel for the frame for that. Now it's absolutely rock solid.

    To tell the truth I can't tell much difference between bi-metal and carbon, as far as the cutting speed goes, but the bi-metal lasts MUCH longer. Also can't tell much difference in Starrett vs. Morse (bi-metal), but several here have recommended Lenox as the best.

    A couple of years or so ago, John Stevenson gave a good description of the process of cobbling up hydraulic (or air) cylinder system for controling the feed rate. I've never gotten around to doing tho. Also I have seen them listed on ebay, for not a whole lot of $$ ...around $30 as I recall.

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  • mrchurchill
    replied
    Re: Feed cylinder:

    My ancient Craftsman/Atlas saw has a dashpot - oil flow from one side of a piston to the other controlled by a needle valve is the regulsting mechanism (centre shaft contains the needle valve and orifices).

    Seems to me that this would be an easily duplicable device if anyone's interested - it's not rocket science by any stratch of the imagination.

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  • Evan
    replied
    Busy Bee Tools has bimetal blades for this saw. 64.5" $21.99 cdn part number B013BMB

    www.busybeetools.com

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  • madman
    replied
    hAD THE MOVING VICE JAW SNAP MADE NEW ONE YEARS AGO FROM ANGLE IRON. iTS A GOOD CHEAP UNIT. i HAD TO SHIM ONE PULLEY A BIT. aLSO OUR SOURCE OF BIMETAL 4-6 BLADES DRIED UP YEARS AGO. wHO KNOWS WHERE TO GET DECENT BLADES FOR THESE THINGS AND WHERE.

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  • matador
    replied
    sorry,cock up


    ------------------
    Hans

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  • matador
    replied
    hi,evan.i have the local version,a tooline MB115.crappy frame fixed by mounting on mobile base,using original wheels plus 2 castors.
    (yoohoo for bedframes)being cheap,i use a carbon blade .i have only broken 1 blade in over a year,and only because i didn't tighten the vise properly.btw,the blade needs to be tight!you won't regret the investment,specially if you have a crook arm.

    ------------------
    Hans

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  • hoffman
    replied
    You cannot live without this machine. As soon as you put it together you'll see the problems and fix 'em the first day.

    ------------------
    Hoffman in Warner Robins Ga

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  • turn2pb
    replied
    Hi Evan,

    I have one like that too. As others stated the stand is flimsy so I spot welded a angle iron frame under the sheet metal stand. Also those little wheels are a joke but easy to remedy if you like. The motor is your typical chinese type so you don't want to push them to hard. Gets hot pretty quick but not a real problem as you don't want to push it to hard to save blade life any way. I wore out about three blades so far and haven't had any problems. Also can tilt the saw straight up so I use it lots to cut freehand.

    brent

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