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  • Motor Woes


    All,

    I have replaced the motor in my mill/drill with a new Dayton, Farm Duty, 2 HP, 19amp, 110 volt on 8/9/04. It is now making the same noises that the original motor did when it went bad.
    It starts, running slowly, but is very loud and vibrates, gets hot after 5 seconds and pops the breaker. This is just the motor hooked up. Belts are off the pulley.

    The first motor did the same thing after a year or so.

    Is there something I am missing here or is this just bad luck ?

    I checked the start capacitor. I put it on the multimeter, Ohms. The needle goes up 3/4 of the way and slowly goes back down. I'm told this is good ?

    BTW, the motor makes a slight noise when it is almost done spinning. Like a brush on metal or somethng.

    I bought it from Grainger, so it is under warranty.

    Comments ?


    Thanks
    Lenord

  • #2
    As it slows, you hear the start switch close and at that time there will usually be some rubbing noises.

    Sounds like something to do with the start switch is bad, or somehow it didn't get wired in. Did it ever work? Sounds like it did.

    Are you sure it is wired correctly? or did you wire it same as the old one?

    Can you in any way illustrate the wiring?

    Does the motor spin free by hand?

    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

    Comment


    • #3
      Lenord:

      Farm Duty is not the correct type of motor for that application - you need a continuous duty commercial grade motor. Farm Duty is a nice way of saying "occasional use". That should solve your problem - I would also consider changing over to a 208/220/240V unit as it will reduce the cost of the motor from the 110V unit.

      Comment


      • #4

        Thanks for the quick reply.

        It was a LOT smoother than the old motor. A lot heavier too. It ran perfectly.

        Last week it started acting up a bit. I would just turn the switch on and off to get it to run properly.

        I had the father wire it up. He was an electrician in another life, so I think it's correct. It is hooked up to a big reversing rotary switch, typical for the machine. Not much was changed from the old wiring.

        It spins freely by hand, not a problem there, just like the old one.....

        Lenord

        Comment


        • #5

          Thrud,

          Do ya think so ?

          Well, shucks. Where do I get one, fast, that is that good ? I have orders that need filling. There is a Blador dealer near me, but they get US$500.00 for a motor. That's double the cost.....Do you have a brand in mind maybe ?

          What about compressor duty ? Some other marketing term that is in a catalog I can find maybe ? A "duty rating " ??

          I thought farm duty was meant to run this much....I use it nearly every day.
          Come to think of it, I had it on most of the morning. I do use it a lot.....but not 8 hours a day every day.....

          Thinking...

          Thanks
          Lenord

          Comment


          • #6
            If you had this happen with original motor ( slow starting and heating up ) could be a voltage drop causing the failure. What size circuit are you hooked up to? Is it a dedicated circuit or a general with other loads on it. Should be at least a 25 - 30 amp with #10 conductors if with in 35' of panel box or #8 if up to 55'. Low current will ruin a motor... something to consider.

            Tim
            Wow... where did the time go. I could of swore I was only out there for an hour.

            Comment


            • #7
              I dunno, hate to disagree with Thrud, but I bet "farm duty" would work as well as the motor I have on mine, which I think was for a fan. I beat on mine, and it has been running 4 years in this life, and I don't know how much in the prior 25 years or so before I got it.

              In any case, farm duty does not explain crapping out in such a way as to not start with no load. At least not unless that motor was SEVERELY overloaded and now has a shorted turn in it, or the like.

              That's possible, of course. But electric motors are pretty tough, and killing one in a couple months of home use is hard. But it sounds like you are a working shop..."orders that need filling".....

              How much you use that thing? Do you run it hard and put it away wet?

              Could chips have got into it? Most Mill-drills come with TEFC motors, so that wouldn't happen.

              A continuous duty motor with a "service factor" over 1 would be good as a replacement.

              The voltage drop idea has merit. Drops cause increased current draw, and more drop, in a spiral until the breaker goes. if not that drastic, they still overheat motors and cause accelerated falure.

              A 2 HP 115V motor pulls plenty current to start with. That's about all you can get on 115V. Could cause quite a drop.

              [This message has been edited by J Tiers (edited 11-30-2004).]
              1601

              Keep eye on ball.
              Hashim Khan

              Comment


              • #8
                A lot of good thoughts above.
                Going out under " no load " conditions gives me a bad feeling. Are you sure it is wired for 120volts? In the 5 seconds before it trips out has it come up to speed? Is the reversing switch connected properly. Having to move the rev. sw. to attain smooth running is suspect. Has it smoked at all?
                Jim

                Comment


                • #9
                  FWIW, I only use Baldor or Marathon Electric motors at work on our pumps, mixers, coating line etc. I've had plenty of Dayton motors fail, yet never a Baldor or Marathon and that includes a Baldor that was severely beaten on by an overloaded prop. The Boston Gear gear box (also very high quality) broke before the motor which still runs today. I did put a Leeson TEFC motor my lathe and so far so good. You might try www.mcmaster.com and aks what brand they sell, I think it's Leeson.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    About the voltage drop idea, have you introduced any additional load on that circuit lately; heater, freezer, etc? In my (limited) experience with high amp 110 circuits, they do things like that when run on too small wire, extension cords, etc. Had a portable air compressor once that didn't like any extension cord that I could find. Wired it for 220 and it worked fine. Presently running some 110 and 220 equipment on 50hz and they don't want to start and sound sound bad. Just more things to confuse you!
                    Rick

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Just a thought,but aren't some motors only designed to run in the horizontal position,something to do with the bearings used.

                      I freely admit that I know next to nothing about motors or electricity,and not much about everything else.

                      Allan

                      [This message has been edited by Allan Waterfall (edited 11-30-2004).]

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        All,

                        The motor is a TEFC.
                        Mounted vertically. The instructions said it was OK to do that.
                        I use it in a working shop, but not 40 hours a week.

                        The circuit is 20 amps. Nothing else is on it.

                        I have a bandsaw, lathe, big drill press etc. in the shop. All have motors that have outlasted the mill, with even more use.

                        I was told you can't wire it up and have it function without it being wired correctly...

                        No smoke or smells.

                        I'm going to call Grainger and see what they say. It comes with a 1 yr. warranty IIRC.

                        I may just get a 1.5 hp with a smaller amp rating that is a better quality.

                        Thanks to you all for your ideas.

                        Lenord

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Was this motor constantly started and stopped? Single phase motors sometimes are rated for only so many starts/stops in a given time period.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I recently replaced the 2 hp motor on my mill/drill with a 3ph 220v motor and VFD (dealerselectric.com). The total cost with shipping was ~$425. There is a big improvement in the operation of the mill, much quieter, less vibration and of course variable speed.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Lenord

                              Your 20 amp circuit is far to small for this load... your 20 amps line could be wire with only #14 ( if older installation ) even if wired with #12 conductors it still have significant voltage drop. A 2hp motor has the potential of 4000w on start up or say 35 amps... at normal op's it'll draw 17.34 amps and will spike some if the cutter hangs up. This is something you should change ASAP. If you can confirm that the conductors are at least a #12 and that no other loads are attached in any way. Then you could upgrade the existing circuit to a to 230 volts as long as you re identify the neutral conductor (white lead) as a load carrier. Banding with red tape would work at the panel and outlet as will as any other junction box that the wires passes thru and install a two pole 20 amp breaker. Then you could get a 230v 2hp motor. Oh one more thing take a close look at the conductors first... look at the copper if it has a reddish hue to it... that is a indication of a prolonged overload and the whole line should be replaced for safety's sake. If your stuck with 115v motor then go with a # 10 or # 8 sized conductor. As with all advise given over the net.. You are the only one who can verify things like the length of the run and so forth. If you do not feel comfortable working with electricity then please hire a Licensed Electrician.

                              Tim
                              Wow... where did the time go. I could of swore I was only out there for an hour.

                              Comment

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