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  • Showing off (Pics)

    (Sorry about the pic size, I thought photobucket would trim it when I submited them.)

    Thanks, guys for the help with numerous questions in the last week or two. I am almost finished, but I'm ready to show off already.

    What I have been making is a threading box. It looks like this:


    It makes threaded wooden rods, 1-5/8 x 4, like this:


    I made it in two parts, with one threaded, and the other as a guide, sized the same as the rod.


    I am nearly finished with the corresponding tap. I have to decide whether to drill it for a T-handle or mill a square and make a wrench that can also be usedon taper reamers. The tricky part will be to mill the grooves that will properly relieve cutting edges. ANY IDEAS HOW BEST TO DO IT? I just have a milling attachment. I was going to use a ball end mill set just under dead center.


    I was pleased to see all my arithmatic worked out -- the tap fits the die !!


    Here is a picture of the cutter. I had to hardent and temper it, and it came out right the first time !!




    [This message has been edited by elbryant (edited 03-01-2005).]
    Ed Bryant

  • #2
    Well done. I have a wood working friend that would love to have a tool like that.

    To reduce the size of your photos hit the EDIT button at the top of the photo and resize to 50%.

    I have found that it is better to resize before puting them into PhotoBucket, they load faster.
    To invent, you need a good imagination - and a pile of junk. Thomas A. Edison

    Comment


    • #3
      If you have a nut that fits the tap blank you can just drill the cutting flutes in from the front end. Look at a factory made tap to get an idea as to how much hook to put in,should show up best in a bottoming tap .
      Lumpsmith

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      • #4
        Thats pretty neat. Im wondering where all the sawdust goes when the metal threads take their place just after the cutter.

        Comment


        • #5
          Stanko,

          The picture of the cutter is taken through a hole milled in the side of the unit. The wood comes out there. The cutter cuts the complete thread in one pass - different from cutting metal threads.

          Ed
          Ed Bryant

          Comment


          • #6
            Charlie,

            1-5/8 x 4 isn't a standard nut, so I would have to make it. Any other suggestions?

            Ed
            Ed Bryant

            Comment


            • #7
              Very nice work elbryant. Looks like a fun job.
              Michael

              Comment


              • #8
                VERY NICE job...

                Comment


                • #9
                  beautiful work!
                  of course i have to ask, what the heck uses a huge wooden screw like that?

                  andy b.
                  The danger is not that computers will come to think like men - but that men will come to think like computers. - some guy on another forum not dedicated to machining

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Bookbinding presses, in my case, specifically a press called a "lying press" that allows work on the edges of the book. I also use them for a "plough," which is a device for trimming the edges of the book. In the past, they used to be part of woodworking vises, and still are in a few cases.

                    Ed

                    [This message has been edited by elbryant (edited 03-01-2005).]
                    Ed Bryant

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Neat, lee valley tools sells setups for making wooden threads in many sizes like this, however they cost a bunch more.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Cool work..but why not just use an ACME screw, unless you are recreating a press, seems like a metal acme screw would do a better job.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Tryp,

                          Unless Lee Valley has something really new, their thread boxes make smaller pitched threads.

                          Ed
                          Ed Bryant

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Cliff,

                            The main reason for the wooden screw is the rapid action. Steel, low pitch threads are too tempting to clamp beyond the ability of the backing boards to hold up, squeezing the book out of shape.

                            Ed
                            Ed Bryant

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Thanks for shareing and great workmanship! Got me green with envy. Would look great hanging on my woodshop wall!
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