Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

zero in vice on mill tabel

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Another one: Just take a skimming cut across the face of the fixed jaw. Done. Zero runout. And gives you a zero for tool settings.

    No kidding. Started making my own vise jaws a while back. What a great thing. They're usually just a piece of flat bar with screw holes. If you make your own you can mill fixtures and stops for repeating jobs, or contours for odd-shaped pieces. Easy. And in that case, you might as well just take a cut across the face to guarantee square & truth.

    Another one:

    Bolt a pair of small, unobtrusive blocks or cylinders to the table, one at each far corner. Take a small guaranteed-to-be-square cut off those. Good, now leave them there forever. If you want to use the vise, put a long straight bar of anything in the vise jaws. Push it up against your blocks and clamp to table. Done. Might be off by x nths of a thou, but across the length of the table it becomes a very small error indeed.

    Comment


    • #17
      Hey,
      I am a nebie so take that into consideration. I bought the mini laser center/edgefinder and WoW!!! I think it will make my life a considerable amount easier. I am not well versed in the use of the indicator and usually give up shortly after trying. For me I think it will be a great help. Fred

      Comment


      • #18
        Is the fixed jaw flat?

        If the jaw is bowed you can run an indicator across it all day it wont be true.

        Yes this has happened to me lol

        Dont worry once you get your own system it will take you less than 5 minutes to square up the vise. Once you get good at it you dont flinch at breaking your machine down.

        Comment


        • #19
          Why does everybody shy from table keys?

          Once you fit them it's done,over,fin,fineto.

          No,squares,no slop,no indicators,just a wrench and two bolts,that's it.

          Neat thing is,the vise CANNOT slip out of square,ever!

          B-ports are bad enough with going out of tram,why add to the problem with a vise that runs off?
          I just need one more tool,just one!

          Comment


          • #20
            the problem with keys is you can not set the vise at an angle. also if you have a job too big for a vise do you put keys in it first? indicating a vise is the first thing to learn. then you have to learn to tram in a round part. then how to find center with an indicator.

            Comment


            • #21
              <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by bob308:
              the problem with keys is you can not set the vise at an angle. also if you have a job too big for a vise do you put keys in it first? indicating a vise is the first thing to learn. then you have to learn to tram in a round part. then how to find center with an indicator.</font>
              Angle setting?That's why they make swivel bases.
              No,but for these jobs the vise is removed anyway.
              Indicating a workpiece should be learned,so should properly fitting table keys to a vise,but indicating the vise everytime it is removed and installed is a waste of time,wasting time is not a marketable skill(unless you work for the government)

              Finally,use reverse logic,if you wanted to indicate a part that's clamped to the table with no registers every time you use the mill.....then why have a vise at all?

              Not riding you,but after indicating everything under the sun for the last 15 odd years,I use table keys more than indicators.

              I just need one more tool,just one!

              Comment


              • #22
                There's a couple diff ways i learned through progression... basically throw the vice on, aline it roughly with a square... clamp something in the vice like 123 blocks.. tighting the RIGHt side of the vice (not totally but almost) and just barely snug the left side... start 0 at the right side of the vice move to left... now you can either try to hit half the difference, OR waht i do now is move the table slowly and just tap the vice int he opposite direction of indicator travel untill you see the incidator not moving. Then run the indicator back to the left and amke sure it reads 0/0... then fine tune accordingly... this can be done by just simply tightening one vice clamp a little more.

                once you learn how to tap the vice to ALMMOST alined while moving the table, indicating is a breeze. Helps with indicating blocks on angles aswell!

                [This message has been edited by Derek13 (edited 03-04-2005).]

                [This message has been edited by Derek13 (edited 03-04-2005).]

                Comment


                • #23
                  Wierd, Keys are great if you are only using the vise in one direction and on the same machine. Granted in a home shop environment multiple vises being used on several different machines is not likely, but there are always exceptions. I currently own 5 mills, all with varying T slot widths. Going from a single vise to a multiple vise set up on any one mill would require changing keys. Add to this different vise manufactuers and you end up with a nightmare of possibilities in mixed up keys. If you learn how to do it without relying on keys, then, it will not matter if you have them or not. The issue of commonality and standarization make set ups go faster, but unless you are a fairly good sized business, you will find a mixed bag of work holding devices. I have yet to work in a place that got rid of anything that was not broken beyond repair or use. One small shop I was in for 2 months used an old wood working vise because the owners father used to use it in the 30's, so it held that it could still be used in the 70's right along side thte 1885 punch press that scared the begebers out of me every time I ran it. They threw out nothing and the back room looked it.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Did I say keys always have to be used?No,they do not,but if you have one,two or ten vises that get used on the same machine over and over it is stupid to keep indicating in the same vise everytime.

                    So,just go out and make things complete.Take all your lathe chucks off and face the registers off.That way you can swap chucks between lathes,all you have to do from then on is indicate them in,right?
                    I just need one more tool,just one!

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Stupid is assuming what works best for you is the best way for everyone else. Use the key if you want, I dont like them I prefer to see that the vice is square by indicating it. I bet I can put on a vise, indicate it, know that it is squarer than yours, and it would only take a min or two longer. I would hardly call that wasting time, more like part of the job.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        I too don't like the keys that come provided with some of the Kurt vises. Nice idea but I like to "know" that the vise is zeroed-out. The keys don't repeat well enough for me. Just as a rule of thumb going through apprenticeship I had always been told that before you start a job of material importance, always indicate the vise in, no question, and check it again after you've done heavy milling. To each his own, but I've found the keys don't give me enough piece of mind to rely on.
                        Greg

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by mochinist:
                          Stupid is assuming what works best for you is the best way for everyone else. Use the key if you want, I dont like them I prefer to see that the vice is square by indicating it. I bet I can put on a vise, indicate it, know that it is squarer than yours, and it would only take a min or two longer. I would hardly call that wasting time, more like part of the job.</font>
                          There are methods that work without fail and those that work most of the time.
                          Once the keys are fitted and milled true to the travel of the machine the vise jaw will indicate in to the accuracy of the chuck jaw period.There is no guess work and no chance of it slipping.

                          Fitting and truing vise keys IS part of the job,if you want to cut corners that's fine with me,just don't do it on my dollar.

                          I just need one more tool,just one!

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Don't worry weird, I make it a point not to work for a-holes that think they know everything.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Hate to do it but I gotta side with the weird one. There's nothing in the use of keys to preclude checking the face with an indicator or to prevent the use of a swivel base. No one's holding a gun to your head but in a job shop where time is money spending time to dial in a vice when you don't have to doesn't make sense. If you're looking for greater accuracy than the keys can provide then you should be using a surface grinder not a mill.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Ok whatever use the keys I just said I don't like them. I can put on a vice in a small amount of time my way. My boss seems to be happy with my times, I got a raise last week and have bonused every six months for the past five years. Guess I will keep wasting my time.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X