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What Constitutes ORIGIN

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  • What Constitutes ORIGIN

    Ok there has been a lot of talk about imported items. But lets say you purchase materials raw or otherwise some of them are from other Countries but you combine or turn them into a new gizmo. Should the origin be the making or the material... maybe a percentage rating. Should it be stated Made in X from Y supplies. And would this influence your buying it? All that industry thread got me thinking about this.

    Tim
    Wow... where did the time go. I could of swore I was only out there for an hour.

  • #2
    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Tinkerer:
    Ok there has been a lot of talk about imported items. But lets say you purchase materials raw or otherwise some of them are from other Countries but you combine or turn them into a new gizmo.</font>
    I had some Chineese food the other night and I made one hell of a gizmo with it...

    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Tinkerer:
    Should the origin be the making or the material... </font>
    In my case, I would definitely say the origin of my gizmo was both the material and the making..

    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Tinkerer:
    Should it be stated Made in X from Y supplies. And would this influence your buying it? </font>
    I definitely make them, but I would NEVER buy one! Would you like to buy one?

    -3Ph

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    • #3
      We just might be straying a leeeeeetle off topic with the gizmo thing. Maybe not though. We have been talking about c--p machines a lot.
      I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

      Comment


      • #4
        The actual rule is that the country with the greatest percentage content is the country of origin.

        Comment


        • #5
          3 PH, could you please post some pics of the "gizmo" you constructed using only Chinese food as raw material. I would be very interested in seeing it. I am planning on having some General Tzo's chicken for lunch so perhaps I could make something useful with it.
          Maybe a nice gift for my boss
          If it's nice enough perhaps he could give me a raise...

          ------------------
          Hoffman in Warner Robins Ga

          [This message has been edited by hoffman (edited 03-26-2005).]
          Techno-Anarchist

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          • #6
            &gt;&gt; 3 PH, could you please post some pics of the "gizmo"

            3 Ph. --- DON'T YOU DARE!

            An' fer tha' ress of ya' all, you can keep your "gizmos" to ya' selves, too! Sheesh!

            Seriously, though... I think Jpfalt is right - it's the country with the highest percentage of parts/labor.

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            • #7
              Not to be a killjoy or anything but... When we have to ship equipment to Mexico we have to follow the following rules. If we bought the equipment from a US manufacturer we put USA on the packing. Same for buying equipment from other places.

              If we make the machine, we are required to list the origin of the large parts. Motor, plc, specialized parts etc get noted separate and must have serial numbers on the list. Then we have to note that it was designed and built in the US.

              This may only be for our company. I never really asked about the rule, just adhered to it. Following the herd... moooo mooooo

              rock

              Almost forgot, Im all for seeing a photo of the gizmo. Did you save it or eat it?
              And if you ate it, you can keep the photo.

              [This message has been edited by rockrat (edited 03-26-2005).]
              Civil engineers build targets, Mechanical engineers build weapons.

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              • #8
                I think some new cars have the percentage deal. I bought a new ford ranger in '98 and I think I remember it having a percentage and also a note that the transmission was made in Japan.

                It was a grinding piece of crap 5-speed transmission, and the ball joints went bad at 40k, but not otherwise a bad truck. I have a '93 F250 now.

                There are probably laws concerning country of origin, bat they are probably easily got around, too.

                -James

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                • #9
                  <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Jpfalt:
                  The actual rule is that the country with the greatest percentage content is the country of origin. </font>
                  Ok lets say Billy Bolt Company been building and bending U-bolts since the buggy days. Billy brags that their U-bolts are 100% US made. But in fact all the steel Billy buys is imported. Since they contain 100% imported steel... and that is what a bolt is all about. Would Billy Bolt be full of BS.


                  3Ph you know what they say... Neil don't like advertising on his board.. so quit trying to sell your chinneese crap here.

                  Tim

                  [This message has been edited by Tinkerer (edited 03-26-2005).]
                  Wow... where did the time go. I could of swore I was only out there for an hour.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    How do they calculate the % thingie?

                    Volume, Mass, 1 out of 100000 parts in the vehicle?

                    Volume...well, the body is made in the states, and that's the biggest part...who cares about everything else. You buy the car for the appearance anyway.

                    Mass...well, the body is made in the states, and that's the heaviest part...who cares about everything else. You buy the car for the appearance anyway.

                    Count...Well, the wire is all made in the states, and there are 10000 inches of wire, so yes, the car is made in the states.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      jamscal:

                      I had a 'grinding' Jap tranny also, then I drained the 'heavy breakin' 20wt motor oil out of it and replaced it with the 'recommended' stuff

                      5w/50w

                      And it NEVER clicked/ground again!! Of course, when getting ready to shift into reverse, you had to first go to a 'sycnro'd' forward gear or wait for what seemed 'an hour' for the non-sync'd reversc square gear to stop spinning, but hey, such is life.

                      Just my two cents worth. Or is that mills worth??

                      After changing, it would even go into low at 40 mph w/o grinding (before changing oil, 5mph and grind), but I was NOT stupid enough to then release the clutch....exploding engines are NOT my thing!!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        All new cars sold in the US must legally have the country of origin marked on them, and many other products must as well.
                        The percentage of origin is based on monetary value of the parts- thus, if 10 bucks worth of parts are imported on a 100 dollar tool, they can get away calling it made in the usa- but if the gold is imported on a ring, they have to say its imported, as the gold is the major cost.
                        My Honda Element came with a sticker that said 70% US made- and the 30% was the automatic transmission, which came from Japan.
                        My F150 is probably less american made than the element- it came from Canada.

                        here is an interesting quote I found on the net, for all you guys who only buy US cars and trucks-

                        "As far as U.S. Stuff can tell, there are no makes of cars that are 100% American made. The closest U.S. Stuff has seen is 2001 Oldsmobile Intrigue GLS Sedan and the 2001 Pontiac Widetrack Grand Prix GT Sedan, made by USA owned Oldsmobile/General Motors and USA owned Pontiac/General Motors, both assembled in Kansas City, Kansas, USA, with a USA engine, USA transmission, with 96% US/Canadian parts content. Check the parts content sticker, though. The Grand Prix SE Sedan has a Mexican engine.

                        A close second, (and usually first) are the 2001 Saturn S models. They are made by the USA owned Saturn/General Motors, assembled in Spring Hill, Tennessee, USA, with a USA engine, USA transmission and 95% US/Canadian parts content. The 1998s (pretty sure) were the same, but in the 1999s they went "downhill in Spring Hill" with 90% U.S./Canadian parts. Saturn got their act together and have the 2001s back up to 95%. Saturn recently came out with their larger L models, which have lower US/Canadian parts percentages (80% for 2001), the V6 engine is from the UK, and their commercials used to brag about the L model's German engineering. You can't have it all.

                        Also in second for model year 2001 are the Ford Tauruses, the Ford F150 Lariat Harley-Davidson model, and the GMC Safari. Like the Saturn S's, the Fords and the GMC are USA owned, USA assembled, with USA engines, USA transmissions and 95% US/Canadian parts. The Taurus's cousin, the Mercury Sable is the same, but with 90% US/Canadian parts.

                        Honorable mention for a car made by a foreign owned car company would have to go to the 2001 Chrysler Prowler. German owned Daimler-Chrysler's Prowler is USA assembled in Detroit, Michigan, with a USA Engine, USA Transmission, and a very high 94% US/Canadian parts content (Could be mostly Canadian, though. Can't tell for sure. Just hope it's mostly USA.)

                        1998 Ford F150s and F250s use to be 95% on some models but the 1999s went down to around 90%, with many including Japanese transmissions. The (1999?) Plymouth Prowler was 90%. Many 1998 Mustangs were 90% but the 1999s were are around 85%. The Chevy Blazers were around 90%. Many 1998 Tauruses were around 85%. 1998 Corvettes, Grand Prix, Intrigues, Cavaliers were around 82%. Chrysler had some vans around 90% with US assembly and the Durango was around 80%.

                        Some Camrys, Accords, Nissans, Mazdas, Mitsubishis, (all?) Mercedes M sport utilities, (all?) BMW Z sports cars are assembled in the US.

                        The term US/Canadian doesn't tell you how much is US. U.S. Stuff would, though, recommend looking for USA ownership, USA final assembly, USA transmission and USA engine, with the highest US/Canadian parts content you can find. This info (except for ownership) is listed on the parts content sticker. On new vehicles it should be attached to the vehicle window, like the price sticker. On 2001 Hyundais, the parts content sticker is a nearly invisible clear decal on window (Miniscule to zero US content). Nissan vehicles and 2001 Lincoln Navigators have been seen by U.S. Stuff with the content sticker on the opposite side of the vehicle from the price sticker (don't want you to see it?), Chrysler products had them incorporated into the price sticker (good choice, can't fall off without the sticker price falling off, too). Some Pontiacs and the Corvettes had them (and still did for model year 2001) folded up so you couldn't see them unless you unstuck one of the ends of the sticker from the window and unfolded it (good info, but are they too ashamed?).

                        It's been said (by a dealers association) that the formulas for content are inaccurate because they combine US and Canadian content, and they treat parts diffently when the parts provider is owned by the auto company and when it isn't. This, they say, makes parts/vehicles with the same US content have radically different percentages on the parts content sticker.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Tinkerer:
                          Ok lets say Billy Bolt Company been building and bending U-bolts since the buggy days. Billy brags that their U-bolts are 100% US made. But in fact all the steel Billy buys is imported. Since they contain 100% imported steel... and that is what a bolt is all about. Would Billy Bolt be full of BS.
                          [This message has been edited by Tinkerer (edited 03-26-2005).]
                          </font>
                          Not really,the steel Billy uses can be from anywhere.The bolts he makes must be sent through a certification process to be worth a crap.Doesn't matter if the steel is US or not,all must be tested.

                          Besides,if the bolts carry certs Billy can charge more



                          [This message has been edited by wierdscience (edited 03-26-2005).]
                          I just need one more tool,just one!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by jamscal:
                            I think some new cars have the percentage deal. I bought a new ford ranger in '98 and I think I remember it having a percentage and also a note that the transmission was made in Japan.

                            It was a grinding piece of crap 5-speed transmission, and the ball joints went bad at 40k, but not otherwise a bad truck. I have a '93 F250 now.
                            -James

                            </font>
                            Yep,I have one too.They came with two different boxes,one Mitsubishi the other Isuzu.
                            The Mitsu sounds like it has rocks in it from the factory
                            Be glad you didn't get the German automatic,total POS.

                            I just need one more tool,just one!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Bought two Campbell-Hausfeld compressors for the shop. Needed to replace the bearings in one of the motors - they spend lots of time running - brand of bearing is "CHINA".

                              Literature that came with the machines said, "Made in the US - quality construction that you can count on". The motor nameplate says "made in St Louis, MO".

                              Maybe I shouldn't be surprised. 60 gallon, 3HP machine for $400 is cheap. The manufacturer should say ASSEMBLED IN THE US WITH FOREIGN PARTS. But then people like me wouldn't buy them.


                              ------------------
                              Barry Milton
                              Barry Milton

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