Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

New Member - New Machinist

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • New Member - New Machinist

    Hello Forum!

    I am in the process of a complete rebuild on an Atlas 101 that was my Father-in-law's.

    Cannot stand the keyless chuck that came with it so I was intending to replace it with a 0-1/2" MT1 keyed chuck and perhaps a 3/4" MT1 as well.

    My question is: chucks are available with a JT to be used with a seperate arbor and those with MT tang attatched - so what are the advantages or disadvantages to either style?

    Thanks in advance for the replies - I promise to read them all with or without paragraph breaks
    \"But the Junkyard IS my storage area, Honey!\"

  • #2
    Angus,

    Welcome aboard! Always nice to have a new person to poke fun at (just kidding!)

    Theintegral shank does eliminate the possibility that the chuck could ever slip on the arbor. I've never had this happen but it is possible.

    The integral shank is slightly more compact which gives you more working room between headstock & tailstock. It should be more ridig & more accurate.

    With all that in mind, every chuck in my shop has a seperate arbor. The most accurate of the bunch is the Jacobs High Torque Keyless. Jacobs guarantees TIR at less than .0015" and mine indicates .0009". Paid about $100 for a new one on eBay. Capacities of .512" or .630" are available with MT1 arbors.

    Jacobs Super Chucks are some of the nicest keyed chucks available. They aren't quite as accurate as the keyless. I've never had one that indicated less than .002" TIR. Also, you're somewhat limited by the availability of MT-JT arbors. 1MT will only adapt to 0JT, 1JT, 2JT & 6JT. Which means the largest Super Chuck is the 11N, with a capacity of only 3/8".

    Hope this helps. Good luck!

    ------------------
    Barry Milton
    Barry Milton

    Comment


    • #3
      Angus - Whereabouts in Maine? I'm in Damariscotta.

      ------------------

      Comment


      • #4
        Ditto what Barry says. And... Welcome to the ZOO!

        Comment


        • #5
          Thank you, it is great to be here. Metal work is new to me as a carpenter, but I have always had an interest.

          I hope my neighbor Herb will weigh in here on my question - especially since he is the first one I am going to turn to if I start to go down in flames!

          In fact, he has already bailed me out once, big kudos to him

          The eBay clock keeps time with my heart!!!
          \"But the Junkyard IS my storage area, Honey!\"

          Comment


          • #6
            Thank you, it is great to be here. Metal work is new to me as a carpenter, but I have always had an interest.

            I hope my neighbor Herb will weigh in here on my question - especially since he is the first one I am going to turn to if I start to go down in flames!

            In fact, he has already bailed me out once, big kudos to him

            The eBay clock keeps time with my heart!!!

            ------------------
            "But the Junkyard IS my storage area, Honey!"
            \"But the Junkyard IS my storage area, Honey!\"

            Comment


            • #7
              Is there an echo in here?

              Sorry about the double post, but I don't even know how I did it!



              ------------------
              "But the Junkyard IS my storage area, Honey!"
              \"But the Junkyard IS my storage area, Honey!\"

              Comment


              • #8
                Before you scrap that keyless chuck, look for the brand name. If it is jacobs or albrecht (maybe the same thing, I do not know) or cushing, you can get rebuild parts for a small price. This is very much worth it.

                I just priced new chucks for my shop - 21 in all, 3 keyless. The cost with arbors was quite high, figured about $80 to 100.00 per chuck set-up as i recall (+/- 10). I looked on the net for instructions on how to re-build chucks and refurbish chucks, came up with two great pages with instructions. I did these 5 at a time, and those with unbearable wear, (about 7 total, and 2 keyless), I bought the parts needed, and arbors for those needing it. Probably $20.00 for parts, and about $8.00 to 14.00 for arbors. And the re-builds, after you get a general set-up figured out is scary easy. Figured I saved the taxpayers about 1600.00 all said and done (yet they still will not build a stautue in town square honoring this accomplishment).

                Might look into this, you might learn to love his keyless chuck for a small price, or even just th price of cleaning it up and making it work right.
                CCBW, MAH

                Comment


                • #9
                  Angus, as a fellow woodworker, let me also welcome you to metal working. You will like working metal. Things happen much slower in metal working than it does in wood where one slip of the Marples and you've made another hour of heat for the wood stove! Hell, you got a welder, ain't no reason you can't achieve perfection on every project when working metal

                  Ray........
                  - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
                  Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

                  It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Another new member chiming in here. Getting back into doing machine work after being away from it since high school. Used to make parts for farm machinery and things like that, on several OLD machines. Most of Dad's machine collection predates WWII. Now have a 1936 Craftsman 12x36" out in the garage I'm in the process of getting fixed up; have a bunch of gunsmithing projects waiting for that.
                    Mark

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Mark,

                      Welcome! You'll (love it/hate it/enjoy it) here............usually all in the same day.

                      I see you're from Johnston, Iowa. Have you ever visited Wolfe Machinery? http://www.wolfemachinery.com/ They are primarily a rebuilder of older DeWalt radial arm saws but have occasional metalworking machines for sale. Really nice bunch of folks. Worth a visit.



                      ------------------
                      Barry Milton
                      Barry Milton

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Hadn't been there; will have to keep an eye on that one. Thanks.
                        Mark

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Howdy Angus, good to have ya here. Smitty
                          Smitty.... Ride Hard, Die Fast

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Thank you to all for the warm greetings!

                            I am excited about this forum and hope to learn much more in the days to come.

                            A note for Barry (and any who might have smaller tailstocks, like me) Victor Machinery Exchange now offers 1MT chuck arbors in the following configurations:


                            $4.50 DCA-1M-OJ 1MT to 0JT Drill Chuck Arbor 1 M.T. 0JT

                            $4.50 DCA-1M-1J 1MT to 1JT Drill Chuck Arbor 1 M.T. 1JT

                            $4.50 DCA-1M-2J 1MT to 2JT Drill Chuck Arbor 1 M.T. 2JT

                            $4.50 DCA-1M-3J 1MT to 3JT Drill Chuck Arbor 1 M.T. 3JT

                            $4.50 DCA-1M-4J 1MT to 4JT Drill Chuck Arbor 1 M.T 4JT

                            $4.50 DCA-1M-6J 1MT to 6JT Drill Chuck Arbor 1 M.T. 6JT

                            $4.50 DCA-1M-33J 1MT to 33JT Drill Chuck Arbor 1 M.T. 33JT

                            Sorry it didn't paste up nicer (I admit I am too lazy to type it all)

                            This seems to open up some more possibilities for me - like a much desired 14N Jacobs Super Chuck!

                            Made the mistake of dropping by member Herb's shop and seeing his - I was sold on the spot. There is no comparing the Jacobs ball bearing to the 1/2" OE that I am using now.


                            Thanks again for the advice and welcomes!


                            ------------------
                            "But the Junkyard IS my storage area, Honey!"
                            \"But the Junkyard IS my storage area, Honey!\"

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Doggone, first time I've ever made a mistake (TODAY) <LOL>. Good catch on the 1MT arbors, first time I've seen them for the other sizes.

                              You'll like the Super Chuck 14N in the tailstock. Some people use a keyless in the tailstock but you are limited to truning the spindle in the forward direction -- if you run it in reverse (like withdrawing a tap) the chuck will loosen.

                              The keyless is nice in the mill. Had a job today to locate, drill & counterbore clearance holes in ground flat stock. It is so quick to chuck up the wiggler, chuck the twist drill, chuck the counterbore and be done. Faster than changing the ER-40 collets that are used 80% of the time.

                              ------------------
                              Barry Milton
                              Barry Milton

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X