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  • bridgeport mill

    hello,
    i have the opportunity to acquire a bridgeport mill, possibly for free. it needs a motor and possibly some other work. i'm not a machinist by trade, so i'm not thouroughly familiar with mills, however, i do know that it's a desirable piece of equipment to have in one's shop. what i'd like to know is what exactly i'm looking at. the machine has a large table at about waist height,and the the only identification i'm able to find on it, other than the name is the model number 148933, stamped onto a plate mounted to an access door on the left side. can anyone help? thanks in advance.

  • #2
    Welcome! Just some advice that's worth what you paid for it I don't have much $$ so I acquire machines that need work. Often during teardown you'll find some surprises that can be really frustrating and can be more work than you bargained for and if you don't have any machine tools it can get expensive. Fortunately Bridgeports have butt loads of parts available on ebay but replacing a bunch of parts can get expensive in a hurry. Milling machines are also HEAVY so moving one can be quite an adventure in itself. I'd have a friend who's familiar with mills check it out before dragging it home. We'd hate to see you go to the trouble of moving something as big as a bridgeport only to find out it's a complete turd.
    All my machines are turds... Sometimes a turd in hand is better than a turd under the bush though

    ------------------
    Hoffman in Warner Robins Ga
    Techno-Anarchist

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    • #3
      You may want to phone Bridgeport at 203-929-5570, and have the serial # ready. They'll be able to tell you when it was made & perhaps some other info about it.

      They have a website but it's not really helpful unless you're looking for a $100,000 CNC vertical machining center: www.bpt.com

      Hoff has a good point. Try to find out why this Bport is cheap/free. They routinely sell for $1,000 - $4,000, depending.

      ------------------
      Barry Milton
      Barry Milton

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      • #4
        Plasmaphony, I see that you are near me, I will gladly take that dog off your friends' hands as we don't want to see anyone get hurt with a piece of in-opperable machinery. I mean if I can drive to Warminster from mushroom county to pick up a Millrite Doylestown isn't much further for a Bridgeport.

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        • #5
          thanks for the advice :} your reasoning is identical to mine. the last time i used a bridgeport mill was in in my high school shop class some 30+ years ago. i know what they can do, and that's why i've always wanted one, but probably like you could never afford one. i consider this to be one of those "opportunities of a lifetime" that seems too good to be true. i haven't been able to speak with the machinist who uses it; mind you i'm getting this information second hand from my brother-but according to him, they were using the machine and stopped because he thought he heard them say it needed to be "aliigned." so, they removed the motor. so at least i know it operates. at the very least i'd be out the expense for moving it and the replacement motor, but again, it seems too goodto be true. excuse me for being solong winded, but i'm pretty damned excited about it. now, what i really want to know is can someone tell me what kind of a mill this is; i.e. bridge, knee, etc. just from the model number. unfortunately i don't know anyone who is familiar with mills. thanks again

          Comment


          • #6
            <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by plasmapony:
            thanks for the advice :} your reasoning is identical to mine. the last time i used a bridgeport mill was in in my high school shop class some 30+ years ago. i know what they can do, and that's why i've always wanted one, but probably like you could never afford one. i consider this to be one of those "opportunities of a lifetime" that seems too good to be true. i haven't been able to speak with the machinist who uses it; mind you i'm getting this information second hand from my brother-but according to him, they were using the machine and stopped because he thought he heard them say it needed to be "aliigned." so, they removed the motor. so at least i know it operates. at the very least i'd be out the expense for moving it and the replacement motor, but again, it seems too goodto be true. excuse me for being solong winded, but i'm pretty damned excited about it. now, what i really want to know is can someone tell me what kind of a mill this is; i.e. bridge, knee, etc. just from the model number. unfortunately i don't know anyone who is familiar with mills. thanks again</font>
            I would get the bridgeport regardless of the condition unless it's extreamly weathered.. A bridgeport in terrible condition is still probably better than a good drill press.. On the East coast, you can buy a working bridgeport for around $1500. I've seen bridgeports without heads go for $400. If you find a bridgeport with a good head, you can swap heads, rams, and bases.

            We have a bunch of Bridgeport manuals that you might want to browse through or even bring along with you if you plan to go see the mill.. Here are all of the Bridgeport manuals we have:

            http://www.bbssystem.com/viewtopic.php?t=62

            -3Ph


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            • #7
              BRIDGEPORT MILLING MACHINE
              "J" HEAD SERIAL NUMBERS


              The serial number is on the knee of the machine It can be obscured by the chip shield.
              Date Start S/N End S/N
              1938 BH-1 THRU BH-39 Round ram
              1939 BH-40 THRU BH-252
              1940 BH-253 THRU BH-656
              1941 BH-657 THRU BH-1549
              1942 BH-1550 THRU BH-2943
              1943 BH-2044 THRU BH-4105
              1944 BH-4106 THRU BH-4997
              1945 BH-4998 THRU BH-5930
              1946 BH-5931 THRU BH-5931
              1947 BH-7236 THRU BH-8814
              1948 BH-8815 THRU BH-10381
              1949 BH-10382 THRU BH-11378
              1950 BH-11379 THRU BH-11379
              1951 BH-12751 THRU BH-14489
              1952 BH-14490 THRU BH-16700
              1953 BH-16701 THRU BH-19367
              1954 BH-19368 THRU BH-22732
              1955 BH-22733 THRU BH-26962
              1956 BR-26963 THRU BR-31618 Start of V ram
              1957 BR-31619 THRU BR-37278
              1958 BR-37279 THRU BR-42110
              1959 BR-42111 THRU BR-46938
              1960 BR-46939 THRU BR-52598
              1961 BR-52599 THRU BR-58552
              1962 BR-58553 THRU BR-64987
              1963 BR-64988 THRU BR-71981
              1964 BR-71982 THRU BR-79538
              1965 BR-75939 THRU BR-88180
              1966 BR-88181 THRU BR-98089
              1967 BR-98090 THRU BR-108351
              1968 BR-108352 THRU BR-118640
              1969 BR-118641 THRU BR-131778
              1970 BR-131779 THRU BR-138139
              1971 BR-138640 THRU BR-143350
              1972 BR-143351 THRU BR-149294
              1973 BR-149295 THRU BR-157909
              1974 BR-157910 THRU BR-167652
              1975 BR-167653 THRU BR-174083
              1976 BR-174084 THRU BR-180697
              1977 BR-180698 THRU BR-188559
              1978 BR-188560 THRU BR-196987
              1979 BR-196988 THRU BR-206296
              1980 BR-206297 THRU BR-216473
              1981 BR-216474 THRU BR-227523
              1982 BR-227524 THRU BR-231700
              1983 BR-231701 THRU BR-235985
              1984 BR-235986 THRU BR-241350
              1985 BR-241351 THRU BR-245659
              1986 BR-246660 THRU BR-248551
              1987 BR-248552 THRU BR-250531
              1988 BR-250532 THRU BR-252874
              1989 BR-252875 THRU BR-255463
              1990 BR-255464 THRU BR-257888
              1991 BR-257889 THRU BR-259897
              1992 BR-257898 THRU BR-262188
              1993 BR-262189 THRU BP-264586
              1994 BR-264587 THRU BR-267635
              1995 BR-264587 THRU


              Looks like a 1972 Jhead..... Bring it home..Clean it, use it for a while, then you will know what you need to do.....Play and have Fun. LK

              Comment


              • #8
                Bridgeports aren't all that heavy, as machine tools go, but it can be challenging to move them if you're not used to moving big chunks of iron around.

                The price is right; it's probably worth $150 in scrap price alone right now. If they stopped using it, there's likely a lot of wear on the ways and/or screws. Is it usable like that? Well yes, but it depends on what you're going to do with it. Sticking to 0.001 tolerance might be pretty challenging,

                There are a couple of common variations. The early Bridgeports had a round ram, the later ones used a dovetail ram. Some early ones used an M head while all the later ones (50s or so) used a J head. The early J heads had a pulley speed change, then they came up with a veriable speed head. I like the pulley heads; there's less to go wrong and you can always add a VFD if you want the varispeed option.

                They fit nicely into a garage.

                Be warned though, if you get this one, it probably won't be your last machine tool/

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                • #9
                  "it probably won't be your last machine tool"

                  Paul beat me to it.
                  It's not the cost of getting the mill running that breaks you, it's the five other machines and their respective tooling you buy next.

                  "Hey kid. Wanna try this machine out?
                  The first one's free."

                  Seriously, sounds like it might be worth it. HSM's spend their "free time" working on machines. Time costs a shop money, so their trash might be worth more to you. It would be good to have a knowledgable friend in tow when you go to look at it. Even better if that friend has a trailer too

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                  • #10
                    well, i got the machine! the guy is willing to give it to me, for free, motor included, which he was going to keep as a spare for his other mill. now, my only problem is: how do i move this behemoth?

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                    • #11
                      I had mine moved on a trailer that was towed by a pickup truck. The trailer that we rented could be lowered to the ground electrically. Once the trailer was lowered it was only about a 1" drop to the ground.

                      We rolled it off placing 1" iron water pipes under the base and into my garage.

                      Later we dismantled it and carted the peices into my house and down the basement steps. Took three hours to dismantle, move, and reassemble the mill.

                      In both instances we had a total of three people working together.

                      Check with your local rental companies and see if you can locate a trailer like I discribed. It lowers flat to the ground and does not tilt. It is a very easy move.

                      Just plan things out and go slow.

                      You lucky dog!

                      Marv

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                      • #12
                        Click on Enco move 1-5 to see a guy moving a mill by himself..............

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                        • #13
                          Click on Enco move 1-5 to see a guy moving a mill by himself..............


                          http://www.metalworking.com/dropbox/

                          [This message has been edited by lklb (edited 03-31-2005).]

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                          • #14
                            I moved mine (B'port and leblond) on a dual-axle trailer lent to me by the seller. Paid auto wrecker/tow truck about 40 or $50 on each end to load/unload on/off the trailer.

                            Once home with 'em the tow truck operator was able to kind of 'swing' them into my garage for me. Pipe roller movement from that point was easy.
                            Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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                            • #15
                              Have a read of this post from a while ago.

                              http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//Fo...ML/002513.html

                              John s.
                              .

                              Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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