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  • Mill drill as a drill...

    I'm at the point where I really need a decent drill press. My old one is one of those tiny benchtop deals and makes drilling anything over 3/8" a pain.

    My boss at the part time job is REALLY PROUD of all the decent old drill presses so I'm thinking about getting a mill/drill for about $750. That's more than I paid for my knee mill.

    The slowest speed is around 120 and it has an R8 spindle of course everyone knows the rest of the specs.

    Just a thought...

    ------------------
    Deep Sea Tool Salvage
    Techno-Anarchist

  • #2
    I was thinking the same thing. I see all of these harbor freight mills or mill/drills and wondering about their quailty. I know they'll work as a drill press,and that's most likely what I'd use them as for the msot part, when the time comes though, I want a decent mill (something accurate) to mill with too.

    Will those overpriced china mill drills or mill's do that?

    Comment


    • #3
      <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by hoffman:
      I'm at the point where I really need a decent drill press. My old one is one of those tiny benchtop deals and makes drilling anything over 3/8" a pain.

      My boss at the part time job is REALLY PROUD of all the decent old drill presses so I'm thinking about getting a mill/drill for about $750. That's more than I paid for my knee mill.

      The slowest speed is around 120 and it has an R8 spindle of course everyone knows the rest of the specs.

      </font>
      well, if you already have a knee mill, i'm not sure youd be gaining anything and i wonder if you really are addressing the problem. to me, the mill drill would be too much like a big, expensive, desktop drill press. if you need a decent drill press, you'll run into many of the same limitations that you have now. quill travel, no room for large items, lack of table adjustmets and accesories.

      why not spend similar money and actually get a decent drill press? at that level, you could buy industrial quality and scale.

      [This message has been edited by weps (edited 04-20-2005).]

      Comment


      • #4
        I have a geared head mill drill and I find it good as a drilling machine.....It only has a 1hp motor but when building a shed I used it to drill 72 30mm holes in 20mm plate..It took awhile but did it...
        Precision takes time.

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        • #5
          I've been using an Enco 105-1132 ( http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?P...&PARTPG=INLMPI ). You always find them on sale like now.

          I'd recommend it highly. There's enough room under the head to mount a TapMatic 90-X, and enough power to run a 3/4"NC tap through 3/4" HRS. I tap about 100 of these holes every month and the Enco just grunts & goes.

          If you're going to tap larger than 3/4", or drill larger than 1", you probably need a gearhead drill press. But even the used gearheads are pricey. Every decent Arboga I've seen is $2,500 or more.

          Both the 2" & 3" boring head work well. It also functions well as a mill with cutters up to 1" (in an ER-40 collet). You can't take the massive cuts that you would in a 3,000# machine, but again it just chugs along.

          ------------------
          Barry Milton
          Barry Milton

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          • #6
            Any input on this puppy:

            http://www.grizzly.com/products/item...emnumber=G7948
            Techno-Anarchist

            Comment


            • #7
              Kansas_Farmer

              "I was thinking the same thing. I see all of these harbor freight mills or mill/drills and wondering about their quailty. I know they'll work as a drill press,and that's most likely what I'd use them as for the msot part, when the time comes though, I want a decent mill (something accurate) to mill with too.

              Will those overpriced china mill drills or mill's do that?"

              So, you think that mill/drills made in China are overpriced? Have you checked out the US made ones? Or the German ones?

              Comment


              • #8
                <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by hoffman:
                Any input on this puppy:

                http://www.grizzly.com/products/item...emnumber=G7948
                </font>
                I had one vary similar except the motor was not as big (1hp) I think. The first thing I did was replace the 5/8" chuck with a used Jacobs super chuck. Made a difference. I used it for about five years then bought a enco mill/drill supposedly to replace it. I got the bench top CNC bug so decided to convert the M/D to CNC. Then I bought a nice used clausing variable speed 20" drill press with power down feed and sold the import 20" on the "Bay". I really like the clausing but for the money the import 20" is a great work horse. JRouche


                http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...508971533&rd=1
                My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

                Comment


                • #9
                  <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by hoffman:
                  Any input on this puppy:

                  http://www.grizzly.com/products/item...emnumber=G7948
                  </font>
                  Had the JET equivalent at the place I just left , and it S#$%(D BIG GREEN DONKEY D#*^S!!! Couldn't tighten up the motor lock, the handle for the table lift was made of plastic and flexed badly just raising the table, and the table wouldn't clamp tight. But that didn't realy matter since the casting was warped with a noticable forward tilt which could not be corected for. Personaly, I'd opt for the mill drill.

                  This is my first choice in a drill press, but my needs as a pattern maker might be a little different than yours. These were made by Walker-Turner and Delta

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                  • #10
                    I like the mill/drill as a drill for several reasons- it's more accurate with respect to the spindle to table orientation, the table is more rigid and doesn't flex under significant drilling pressure, the table is finely adjustable with the workpiece on it so hole spacing is easy to get right on, trepanning can be done more easily and accurately, significant side loads can be applied whereas a drill press usually isn't suited to this, easy to clamp stuff to, other reasons as well.

                    Disadvantages- sure there are some, among them being the lower rpm capabilities which will affect drilling speeds with small drills. Another is that it will take longer every time to raise and lower the head to get the required height under the chuck. That could turn out to be a real pain. My most important disadvantage is that I often need to be using the drill press and the mill on the same job, and don't want to spend time doing changeovers. It's like the 5 in 1 shopsmith machine- do you really want to convert the machine each time you need to drill say, just one hole?

                    If you're going to be buying the mill/drill just for a drill press, and all of your work will fit on it, then why not? Besides the longer workpiece height capability of a floor model drill press, what operation couldn't be done on it that a standard drill press can do? I'm purposely ignoring the obvious which is the table tilt capability of most all drill presses, but even then, many mill/drills have angle capabilities.
                    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                    • #11
                      mill/drills are great. i have an industrial hobbies mill, which is based off an rf-45 geared head mill/drill but it has the biggest table on a mill/drill you can get in the US.

                      be careful what kinda motor whatever you get has though. i've been having some troubles with mine (read: two motors lost their magic smoke) and i'm NEVER going to buy another foreign motor. screw that crap.
                      -paul

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                      • #12
                        In regards to the limited Z height problem of using a mill drill for a drill press, since the column is a tube why couldn't that be replaced with a longer tube.

                        TMT

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                        • #13
                          TMT,

                          You could extend the column if you made or bought a rack to match the exixting elevator rack.

                          With 18" from spindle to table this usually is not a problem. Even with a huge tapping head like a 90-X, there is lots of room for the workpiece.

                          ------------------
                          Barry Milton
                          Barry Milton

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                          • #14
                            The main problem will be the lack of quill travel.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Unless you have some tall parts to drill, I'd take a mill drill over a drill press any day. For one, most drill press tables are nowhere near square with the quill. For another, if you need to drill an ACCURATE hole pattern, there's just no way to go about it in a drill press except eyeball it, which just doesn't cut it in a lot of cases. Quill travel on most mill drills is 5 inches. Our big Carlton radial arm drill press at work only has 8 and that thing is HUGE, and after that its lower or raise the head and start over, just like a mill drill.
                              Pete

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