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  • Need Speed

    Hello out there,
    I've been a machinist for about 5 years so I'm still a little green! My first 3 or 4 years I worked in a factory doing machine work so time wasn't a factor most of the time now I'm working in a job type machine shop and they want 2 hours work in 30 minutes does anyone have any tricks to speed up my operations ?

  • #2
    Haste is not speed. Getting "faster" takes time and experience.

    My first job as a machinist, I did setup of machining centers. The boss who has been doing it for thirty years, was only an hour or two faster than me.

    Unless you're really dragging you're ass, a two hour job is a two hour job. I've worked for people who expect everything done yesterday. My advice? Tell your boss that you work as fast as you can, if he doesn't like it, go hire somebody else! Some bosses are born ballbreakers and you just have to stand up for yourself.


    HTRN

    ------------------
    This Old Shed
    EGO partum , proinde EGO sum

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    • #3
      This is true as what you said about your boss being able to do it faster and some bosses being ballbrekers my boss has both qualities. But like all the other older machinists that I have worked with they would rather kill you than share valuable secrets they have learned through the years

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      • #4
        Mebbe this http://www.lautard.com/MSTSbook.html would help.....

        ----------
        Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
        Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
        Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
        There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
        Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
        Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

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        • #5
          First you get good then you get fast.

          Comment


          • #6
            What do you call good ?

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            • #7
              Now if You do get good and then fast it becomes expected of you.. A 2 hour job is a two hour job as far as the boss needs to know.
              I have parts that are listed as requiring a half hour to complete. Now what the boss does not know will not kill him
              I always have lots of extra time left.
              It builds character to practice and practice some more.

              personally I do not like the JUST IN TIME SYSTEM it really sucks
              Hey HTRN , what is the deal with all of the legal disclaimers


              [This message has been edited by JS (edited 04-23-2005).]

              [This message has been edited by JS (edited 04-23-2005).]

              [This message has been edited by JS (edited 04-23-2005).]
              NRA member

              Gun control is using both hands

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              • #8
                Watch the fastest guy in the shop. Many times I have seen people take extra steps that were not nescessary. Why? They learned it from someone and assumed there was no better way to do it. Good is a relative term. If you have a FY I'll get it done when it gets done attitude you may risk getting canned. Best approach is to do a good job first. If you do a two hour job in one hour and have to remake it it is still a two hour job with twice the material cost. You will get faster with time and practice. Five years is nothing. I've had old toolmakers tell me they had four year apprenticeships. Do not ever get the attitude you are irreplaceable there is always someone better, faster and smarter and he may be looking for a job.

                CT

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                • #9
                  Job shops are the BEST training school in the world, the place where theory meets practice. Make your bones in a job shop & you're ready for anything.

                  Learn every machine in your shop. Keep a notebook of each setup since you'll run some jobs again & again. Write down the speed, feed, anything unusual.

                  New people spend forever on setup then rush through the machining, overshoot the target, then do it again. LEARN THE SETUPS, that's where the potential time savings are. Since you're already runing the machine at max SFM, max feed, and max DOC, the machine time isn't variable. The only variable is you.


                  ------------------
                  Barry Milton
                  Barry Milton

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                  • #10
                    Work to please yourself, not someone else. Do the best that you can do and if it don't satisfy them you may have to move on. I don't want my self worth determined by someone else who can't be satisfied.
                    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
                    Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

                    It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

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                    • #11
                      I'm not fast. I was never fast even when I thought I was.

                      But I am efficient, I can do anything in the shop, and I don't make many mistakes. 10 good parts with no rejects made with expensive castings having previous operations on them is better than 15 casting and 3 rejects. I eat speedy showboat maachinists for lunch even if I do have to do their shop math for them (How do you figger the compound angle setting to cut that choke taper?).

                      If you're consistant and make your nut every day, you show improvement, give them "8 for 8," your scrap rate is low, and your attendance is good you'll probably be "unfireable" no matter how the boss may rant at you.

                      [This message has been edited by Forrest Addy (edited 04-24-2005).]

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                      • #12
                        Hey, are you management? If not, then ask the managers how they want you to do the jobs. Not as a smart ass, but in a respectful way. Ask them to show you the techniques they want you to use. Demonstrate them so you can learn. It's their job to train the workers, not yours. Then do it their way.

                        Paul A.
                        Paul A.

                        Make it fit.
                        You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

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                        • #13
                          1. Don't sacrifice safety
                          2. study the job before hand
                          3. lay out your tools and have extra bits ready
                          4. keep your area clean
                          5. make good set ups, use carriage and crossslide stops if necessary
                          6. Ask the older guys for tips
                          7 know your machine, does it cut what you dial up?
                          8. maintain your machine
                          9 Don't sacrifice safety
                          Non, je ne regrette rien.

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                          • #14
                            JS, I assume you're talking about the splash page dealy at my site? It's simple. I'm trying to stay out of legal trouble. I have quite a few little tidbits planned that are possibly dangerous/illegal if missaplied. The idea is to keep me out of court. Besides one page of "if you **** this up and hurt yourself it ain't my fault" is hardly alot.

                            If and when I get a Digital Camera(car accident ate up my camera fund), you'll see what I mean.


                            HTRN

                            ------------------
                            This Old Shed
                            EGO partum , proinde EGO sum

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Thanks for the comments, I know that with experience comes speed and greater precision but my biggest problem is that I want all my parts to look good and be right and they usually are> I'm counting the 5 years as doing it for a paycheck not counting school and sweeping the shop floor.What I was hoping for was some new ideas from different people because like someone said you learn from people not knowing any better so you do it thier way untill you learn another so please share the wealth of knowledge that some of you have gained and don't remind me how green I am Hell I deal with that Enough! I know that I have alot to learn and that I'm not the best but that's what will make me better because I want to learn and I always try harder to do it better and learn as much as I can. So any tidbits of information about anything that might make me better would be appreciated

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