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  • Engine block mill shaft?

    Having ordered the back issue for that article (what a wonderful concept...) in looking at the photos I've seen of it there are a few things that come to mind.

    First is the shaft - how does one machine (I assume) seamless machine tubing to take an R8 collet like that?

    I have a Land-Rover 4-cylinder engine block just perfect for this...one bad bore means it's scrap for a Landy, but perfect for this.

    Alan R.

  • #2
    are you in cambodia or something?

    here in the USA you can buy a used bridgeport for 1500.

    just kidding. sort of.


    making an r8 collet spindle would not be hard with a decent lathe.

    good luck!

    Comment


    • #3
      I haven't seen the article in question, but I assume you'd want to chuck the tubing in a lathe, using a stead rest if the headstock spindle hole isn't large enough to accept the tubing through it, get the tubing running exactly true, and bore the R8 taper.
      ----------
      Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
      Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
      Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
      There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
      Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
      Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

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      • #4
        No, I'm not in Cambodia...Massachusetts as a matter of fact.

        I do this for enjoyment - and this looks like an entertaining project. If I had room for a behemoth like a Bridgeport I'd have one - two tons of cast iron is a little outside my shop's space capacities.

        I don't need a monster like that in any case, not for engine parts, make and mend and deneral machining work. I've done quite well for a very long time with the milling attachment I have on my Myford but I'm interested in a bit more capacity.

        Please don't assume that everyone has a 20 x 40 foot shop building with a loading dock door - it just isn't so...

        ajr

        Comment


        • #5
          I'd turn it to undersize on the lathe.

          then get the whole spindle and the rest of the mill together and "run in" for a while with the crap bearings. and then grind the taper and the back seat with a purpose made tool post grinder mounted sticking straight up on the table. or if your head don't swivel so you get the desired angle on the r8, you mount your grinder on a compound slide from your lathe that is now bolted at the correct angle to a right angle plate.


          make any sense.

          I am trying to make it foolproof to get the thing coaxial with the actual rotation axis as fianlly assembled

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Undersize and grind:

            Makes perfect sense. I was personally thinking of a purpose-made form tool or reamer to do the job, but your idea is appealing both from the multipurpose level and for obtaining the desired concentricity.

            Mom used to tell me about lots of one-off jobs like this in the machine shop where she worked - I knew there was a way, but that one hadn't occurred to me.

            Cool!

            ajr

            Comment


            • #7
              Alan,

              Is this what you are referring to? If so, it's an idea from our own G. A. Ewen. His “Engine Millâ€‌ article was published in the Feb/Mar 2002 issue of MW. I'm sure he'll post here and tell you all about it.



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              • #8
                Since you have a lathe, the spindle can be machined completely with standard methods. There is no need to go to any extremes.

                Chuck up the tubing, center with reasonable care to the best of your ability, machine the seat for the R-8 collet with the compound. If necessary, support the spindle with the steady rest.

                The compound angle can be set by dialing the compound to the taper of a R-8 collet.

                That mill is an interesting looking project, and would make a good addition to the home shop.
                Jim H.

                Comment


                • #9
                  mrchurchill,
                  I hope that you enjoy building and using the Engine Mill.

                  When I built mine I had a 9" Standard Modern lathe with a 3/4" spindle hole so all the work on the milling machine spindle had to be done either between centers or with a 4 jaw chuck and tailstock or steady rest.

                  I first used the method posted by JCHannum, (Since you have a lathe, the spindle can be machined completely with standard methods. There is no need to go to any extremes.

                  Chuck up the tubing, center with reasonable care to the best of your ability, machine the seat for the R-8 collet with the compound. If necessary, support the spindle with the steady rest.

                  The compound angle can be set by dialing the compound to the taper of a R-8 collet.)

                  I then made two 'hat top' shaped plugs and center drilled them. One plug was a light press fit into the back end of the spindle tubing and the other was made to fit a collet (can't remember which one but it doesn't realy matter). With this method I was able to turn the outside of the spindle between centers.

                  Good luck with you project.

                  To invent, you need a good imagination - and a pile of junk. Thomas A. Edison

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I'm looking forward to this - it really looks like a great piece of machinery both to build and to have afterward.

                    Many thanks for the commentary. I confess that my Myford's headstock may be a bit too small to handle the tubing as a pass-through, so may end up cutting the R-8 taper in situ once the machine is constructed.

                    Mounting my lathe's cross-slide on a temporary basis is certainly doable, especially if I manufacture an adapter block to fasten it to the table cross-slide.

                    Mr. Ewen - thank you for a great design!

                    Alan R.

                    P.S.: Mr. Churchill is the name of my 1964 Land-Rover 109 pickup - it's just an easy login for me to remember...8*)

                    ajr

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Oh Oh Alan, I think you just did a no-no to George. I think he said in an earlier post that he don't like to be called mister Ewen.
                      Jim
                      Jim

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by shaque:
                        Oh Oh Alan, I think you just did a no-no to George. I think he said in an earlier post that he don't like to be called mister Ewen.
                        Jim
                        </font>

                        I'll let it pass just this one time
                        To invent, you need a good imagination - and a pile of junk. Thomas A. Edison

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          G.A.Ewen - I enjoyed that article. I even looked for an engine block for a while, then I found a Boss mill. Maybe one day I'll make that fun project.
                          Civil engineers build targets, Mechanical engineers build weapons.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I had built a similar machine before I had a factory made mill.

                            I can offer one suggestion,when you machine the spindle,completely machine the outside and leave the inside roughed out to within .020" or so of final size on the taper end.Then install the spindle on its own bearings in the mill and mount your lathe topslide to the mill table and use it to finish turn the spindle taper in place.This will help insure near perfect runout.

                            I found that front wheel drive wheel bearings make excellent spindle bearings as they are double row angular contact balls capable of high loads.Mine were salvaged from a Ford Escort and new replacements were only $28.00 each.
                            I just need one more tool,just one!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              First off, George (may I call you George?) Sorry for the Mr. Ewen.....8*)

                              Secondly, Funny weirdscience mentions Ford Escort wheel hubs. i just did a project (searchlight mount for a Land-Rover fire apparatus/crash truck restoration) and the base casting was a Ford Escort wheel hub (salvaged from some repair work done for a friend).

                              Knocked out the bearings, annealed the sod (propane burner and bucket of silica sand), then machined the inside for two collars to hold bronze bushings and an internal brake collar made from UHMW poly I had on the shelf.

                              Worked beautifully, and looked very much like the original (long-removed) mounting.

                              For the mill, I was actually half-thinking Landy wheel hubs as I have a ton of them and they never wear out.

                              Thanks for the ideas and encouragement, guys - Alan

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