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THANK YOU TO THOSE WHO HAD HELPED ME WITH THE RHODES SHAPER

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  • THANK YOU TO THOSE WHO HAD HELPED ME WITH THE RHODES SHAPER

    This is not a request for further informaion on the Rhodes Shaper. I just wanted to thank those of you who had taken ther prescious time to send me some feedback on a 7 inch Rhodes shaper that I really want to purchase. I did find out a lot more than I had thought that I would, but it all may be academic at this point in time. My wife is giving me a really hard time allowing me to try and make this purchase. To her, it is just another "piece of junk" like she tells me about my WW2 large cannon shell collection. Sure it's ok when I make money on some of the things that I produce, but these items are few and far between. I mostly just "putz" around making useless stuff. Just something to get my mind off of my family problems. Anyway, you guys are a great bunch of fellows. I will keep you updated if I get the machine over my wife's objections. Thank you all once again and keep on machining. It's guys like you that are keeping the "Art of Machining" alive. Gratefully yours, Bill Senko

  • #2
    Good luck, Bill on getting the Shaper. You may also want to remind her that by being able to relax with your machines, you are increasing the amount of time you will have to live and support her in the manner to which she has apparently become accustomed.

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    • #3
      Sorry to hear about the resistance on the home front.

      In my experience, a good Rhodes shaper will not show up often...you may want to appeal the decision.

      A friend and I were talking about hobby costs a few years ago. While we all know that acquiring a sizable home shop costs some money, it pales in comparsion to many other more popular hobbies. My friend had a very good take on this subject in reference to tools. As he pointed out, if purchased used you lose little in further depreciation. You learn new skills using them. You use them to build and repair various items that offset housing and transportation costs. The relaxation that one derives helps maintain mental health. Hopefully your kids and spouse will participate in their use so they gain skills and share quality time. And likely the most important of all, the spouse knows that if you are in your shop doing God knows what you are not out doing the bar circuit doing who knows who.

      Many couples have an agreement that if you spend a dollar on your interests, I get to spend a dollar on my interests. If you buy a $500 shaper, she gets to buy $500 of shoes. Yes I know $500 on shoes is disgusting but life is not fair. This arrangement seems to keep peace in the household. Now on the other hand, I know of couples who have divorced and while the guy's $500 shaper is added to the personal property total, those $500 shoes have depreciated to next to nothing.

      Yep, having an interest in tools and making an effort to use them is good for everyone concerned.

      TMT

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      • #4
        BigBill....

        As a serious Historian, you need to explain to your wife the cultural significance of these precious heirlooms. Without them, we might all be thinking Herr Goebbels was a good guy - she wouldn't agree with that, would she?

        By the time you get through this Malarky, she might forget about the machine tool. Perhaps the cell phone might ring. Anything to distract and use for permission... :>

        --jr
        dvideo

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