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Grizzly G9972Z 11x26 lathe

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  • Grizzly G9972Z 11x26 lathe

    Anyone experienced with this machine, moreover in relation to the 9x19 they offer?

    I'm aware of the obvious differences but are there things I'm missing since, well, truth be told I've no idea what I'm looking at?

    No it's really not THAT bad, just sort of like I can do things on a lathe it'd take you guys 30 seconds to do with a file and a rusty hammer.
    I am but a humble grasshopper. ;O)
    Len

  • #2
    Forgot this

    http://www.grizzly.com/products/item...mnumber=G9972Z
    Len

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    • #3
      I am but a novice myself but I do own the machine in question. That said, I will weigh in with merely my own observations and opinions. I have never used a 9x20 but I did give them thorough consideration before purchasing the G9972Z.

      What I did was drive up to the nearest Harbor Freight to see a 9x20 in person. I wasn't impressed at all with the 9x20. It was much smaller than I had imagined it to be. This may be fine for some but not for me.

      The G9972Z is nearly twice the weight of a 9x20. Overall it is just a more substantial machine. It has a 1" Spindle bore as compared to the 3/4" Spindle bore of the 9x20. The carriage can traverse six more inches of bed allowing work to be done on longer pieces.

      With the 11x26 you get more swing over the bed, a bigger motor, six more inches of bed to work with and more crosslide travel. You also get a 3/4" - 8 T.P.I. leadscrew as compared to the 9x20's 9/16" - 16 T.P.I leadscrew.

      From a hobbyist point of view, if I had to do it all over again, I would still go with the G9972Z. Weighing in at around 450 lbs It is small enough to move around without TOO much trouble yet it is heavy enough to handle some more serious work. With proper attention to setup it is capable of plenty of accuracy for the average home shop machinist.

      If you have any other questions about this machine feel free to ask. I will answer them to the best of my abilities.

      Comment


      • #4
        I have spent about the last tear trying to convince myself this is enough lathe for me. I just need pushed over the edge. Schutzhund- Is there plenty of tooling available for it? ie. ball turners, cut off tools, knurlers, internal -external theading tools, parting tools etc. Also whats the maximum size piece that could be machined in it? Are the gear changes for speed and threading time consuming and difficult? I guess I dont want to regret it later that I should have gone with a 12x36( although I dont have the room) Sorry for the ignorance, this is the only outlet of machining tech. I have found. And its only been 2 weeks ago!

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        • #5
          <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by claw:
          I have spent about the last tear trying to convince myself this is enough lathe for me. I just need pushed over the edge. Schutzhund- Is there plenty of tooling available for it? ie. ball turners, cut off tools, knurlers, internal -external theading tools, parting tools etc. Also whats the maximum size piece that could be machined in it? Are the gear changes for speed and threading time consuming and difficult? I guess I dont want to regret it later that I should have gone with a 12x36( although I dont have the room) Sorry for the ignorance, this is the only outlet of machining tech. I have found. And its only been 2 weeks ago!</font>
          Tooling: not a problem..plenty out there that will fit this machine. I recommend that you pick up a quick change tool post such as a Phase II for even quicker tooling setup.

          Gear changes: are accomplished by swinging open the door on the left side of the machine, removing the "c" clip that retains the gear you wish to swap and switching it for another gear.

          Speed Changes: are accomplished by opening the door on the left side of the machine, losing one bolt that holds the belt tensioner against the belt and placing the belt on a different pulley set. If you find this to be too time consuming at a later time you can always swap out the motor for a variable speed treadmill motor and controller and have speed changes at the turn of a dial. Check out Steve Bedairs' modification to his 9x20 here http://www.bedair.org/Tmotor/Tmotor.html
          for more info on that subject.

          I dont consider ANY of these smaller machines to be "production" units. If you are trying to produce parts quickly and in great numbers then by all means buy more lathe.

          If you can afford a 12x36, have room for one and have a means of moving a 1000 lb+ machine when you need to, then by all means go for it. If you are looking for a capable machine for prototype work or hobby work the 11x26 will probably suit you just fine.

          I cannot speculate as to the "maximum size piece that could be machined in it" as I have not tried turning anything really big in mine. With an 11x26 you have 26 inches between centers and 10-3/4 inches of swing over the bed. The hole thru the spindle is 1" in diameter. So... If you need to machine parts that are MORE than 1" and diameter AND longer than 26" then you will need more machine. A Grizzly 12x36 has a spindle bore of 1-7/16". If you need to do really long parts that are larger than an inch in diameter then a larger machine would suit you better.

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          • #6
            -Edit

            [This message has been edited by Schutzhund (edited 04-24-2005).]

            Comment


            • #7
              -Edit

              [This message has been edited by Schutzhund (edited 04-24-2005).]

              Comment


              • #8
                Bah! I hate board code! =) Every board is different and I am a little rusty. Just clicky the links!

                http://www.tedatum.com/thms/BBoard/big%20closeup.JPG

                http://www.tedatum.com/thms/BBoard/P...20(Medium).jpg

                http://www.tedatum.com/thms/BBoard/jensen01.JPG

                Comment


                • #9
                  AH HA!!!







                  Now...how do I EDIT a post here? hmmmmm :/ Nevermind, I found it =)

                  [This message has been edited by Schutzhund (edited 04-24-2005).]

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    WOW!! thanx for the pics. It really helps. I guess what I meant by size is how far the chuck will open to accept a piece.I wish this conversation would have taken place a year ago Id be making chips right now.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Consider that 150 RPM is the slowest speed.
                      Large diameters or threading may be difficult at that speed. Also, is there power crossfeed?
                      does it matter to you? How big is the drive belt? the 9x20's had a puny belt - 5 mm wide I think. It would be good to see what you are condisering buying in person. Maybe Grizzly can tell you of someone nearby who has the same machine.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thanks for the info!

                        That seems like it'd suit my needs quite well.
                        Small bits, fiddly things, turned & burnished doo dads, mostly for motorcycles and tractors.
                        And at 500 lbs. it's a stout device for sure.
                        Any of that come apart for ease of movement?
                        Len

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Sprocket:
                          Consider that 150 RPM is the slowest speed.
                          Large diameters or threading may be difficult at that speed. Also, is there power crossfeed?
                          does it matter to you? How big is the drive belt? the 9x20's had a puny belt - 5 mm wide I think. It would be good to see what you are condisering buying in person. Maybe Grizzly can tell you of someone nearby who has the same machine.
                          </font>

                          The main drive belt on the 11x26 is also much more substantial over the 9x20 belt. It is a cogged belt measuring 3/4" in width. It looks much like this:



                          The secondary belt is a 3/8" V belt (like an alternator belt on older (pre serpentine belt) cars. The rest of the geartrain is all metal gears.

                          There is no power crossfeed on this lathe, which is no big deal to me. Unless you do alot of facing of large parts it wont be much of an inconvenience.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by QSIMDO:
                            Thanks for the info!

                            That seems like it'd suit my needs quite well.
                            Small bits, fiddly things, turned & burnished doo dads, mostly for motorcycles and tractors.
                            And at 500 lbs. it's a stout device for sure.
                            Any of that come apart for ease of movement?
                            </font>
                            When I have to move mine I pull off the chuck. (It is threaded onto the spindle and you just use the chuck keys to loosen it). I also pull of the tailstock and the crosslide. I suppose if one wished to further lighten the load they could also pull the motor off but I never bother. I have moved mine three times. Once from the crate to the bench. Once into the back of my truck for when I moved to another house. And finally from the truck to the bench again. The first two moves were accomplished by four adults with no mechanical assistance. The last move was done with a 2-Ton engine hoist like this one:


                            I went out and purchased the hoist just so I could move my machines around without bothering anyone. It works well and folds up for easy storage. Not too shabby for $220!




                            [This message has been edited by Schutzhund (edited 04-25-2005).]

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by claw:
                              WOW!! thanx for the pics. It really helps. I guess what I meant by size is how far the chuck will open to accept a piece.I wish this conversation would have taken place a year ago Id be making chips right now.</font>
                              The 3 Jaw chuck that comes with the lathe is 5" in diameter and the jaws open up enough to hold a piece of 2-1/2" round stock. For round work larger than 2-1/2" in diameter a larger chuck could be fitted to the machine.

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