Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Safe way to cool down?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Safe way to cool down?

    I am going to machine some 17-4SS H1150 dry with carbide and want to know some techniques for cooling it down quickly so I can take an accurate measurement, if this is possible, and not mess up its properties.
    Damp rag, blow air etc.?

  • #2
    Maybe a squirt bottle of coolent and wipe it off with a rag?

    Comment


    • #3
      If you are going to use a squirt bottle be careful not to get in on the carbide since sudden cooling tends to pop off chips of it. Flood cooling is what works best. Could you put a pan under the material and use a bottle to hand flood it?

      Comment


      • #4
        I suspect it would be pretty difficult to cool a piece of work quickly, once it heats up, if it's of any size. Just cooling the surface isn't going to do it, you need to cool it all the way through, and that takes time.

        Better not to let it heat up in the first place, probably, if you're in a hurry to measure it. (flood cooling, as per Mike)
        ----------
        Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
        Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
        Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
        There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
        Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
        Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

        Comment


        • #5
          Or, if you know the coefficient of expansion and the temperature, you can calculate the room temperature measurements form thoes obtained while hot...

          Comment


          • #6
            when i cylindrical grind d 2 bits i get a bowl of cold water and a shop rag or two. soak rag wrap part voila it cools. at home toss some ice cubes into the bowl. When precision grinding even hand warmth changes dimensional size so room temp critical for accurate grinding. Also some extra ice o9n hand for a nice alcoholic beverage is a nice idea.

            Comment


            • #7
              I have a flood coolent system, but dont have it put together. That would take an afternoon. Dont need it 90% of the time.I am aware of hot carbide and quick cooling(Crack!)
              I just want to take a measurement after about 4 or 5 passes and just before final pass and dont want to wait 5 to 10 minutes for it to cool down. Doing this as a hobby and trying to get more done in my free time.

              Comment


              • #8
                An air cooler is my primary milling coolant. It can lower shop air temp to minus 30*F http://exair.com/spotcooling_products/asc_page.htm

                I sometimes use it on the lathe for the same reason you mention, don't want to wait all day to measure. Works well and no oily mess to clean up.

                ------------------
                Barry Milton
                Barry Milton

                Comment


                • #9
                  If your compressor can keep up, a simple generous jet of air aimed at the cut will cool the tool & material as well as blow the chips away during the cut. It still warms up a little.

                  Barry's fancy air coolers probably work a lot better (I wouldn't mind having one), but regular air helps a lot.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Vinny has a good point. Even 75*F shop air is much cooler than 300*F steel parts.

                    On every boring job, I blow shop air through the headstock bore toward the boring bar. This is primarily to clear chips away from the toolpoint but it also provides some cooling.

                    ------------------
                    Barry Milton
                    Barry Milton

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      You ever notice that no matter what temperature a room is at....It is always "Room Teperature"!!!

                      Rob

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by precisionworks:
                        An air cooler is my primary milling coolant. It can lower shop air temp to minus 30*F http://exair.com/spotcooling_products/asc_page.htm

                        I sometimes use it on the lathe for the same reason you mention, don't want to wait all day to measure. Works well and no oily mess to clean up.

                        </font>

                        How loud are those air coolers? I was told that they are pretty loud, but the guy that told me, is full of **** most of the time.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The Exair Adjustable Spot Cooler is pretty quiet, less than 75dBA according to the company. You know it's running but it's not annoying.

                          Exair has a 30 day trial period. If you don't like it after 30 days just send it back, no questions asked.

                          ------------------
                          Barry Milton
                          Barry Milton

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X