Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How useful are these.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • How useful are these.

    I will probably never end up with a bridgy - too heavy and too expensive, so I am always thinking of alternatives.

    How useful are these little things?

    ED


    [This message has been edited by elbryant (edited 06-11-2005).]
    Ed Bryant

  • #2
    I saw a picture of a live steamer facing all his engine drivers in one pass using a large mill with one.
    Another idea that comes to my head is using a slitting saw and cutting strips off a piece of plate, had to do that with my bandsaw then trim up on the mill, wasnt very fun.
    I'd take one, although I'd be a bit concerned about sharpening those expensive horizontal mills, others say thats what the surface grinder is for.

    Comment


    • #3
      great for long keys, splines gears and deep slots, I would love a small horz. mill.

      a small one for home would be sweet.

      here is the one at the work shop, a 1965 hitachi seiki, 3 axis power feed and rapid traverse with stops, a fine machine.


      Comment


      • #4
        The small Atlas(Craftsman) bench mill is fine for model makers but I found it too light and not rigid enough for any serious milling. I disassembled mine after getting a gear head mill/drill and converted the mill into a small surface/tool grinder.


        [This message has been edited by Ted Coffey (edited 06-11-2005).]

        Comment


        • #5
          I have a little horz just like that Atlas. I use it for small stuff when I don't want to fire up the 3ph or when it is too cold to go into the garage. There are many things you can make on it. You can get a vert spindle for them. There are all sorts of things that you can do with them but.........

          They are not as rigid as a bigger machine. You must take little cuts. You have to watch the weight of what is on the table. Etc etc etc. But I have seen many a nice project come off of these.

          Check out the following yahoo groups.
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/atlas_craftsman/

          http://finance.groups.yahoo.com/grou...ineusersgroup/

          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/mwmills2/?yguid=8056091

          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/mwsmal...?yguid=8056091

          Not all are deticated to the horizonal mill but they often have sections with files on the mills.

          rock-
          Civil engineers build targets, Mechanical engineers build weapons.

          Comment


          • #6
            I had one, it was my first "lathe" and "vertical" mill as I never did use it for a horizontal mill. Bored, milled, faced and drilled on it. Made a Stuart Walking Beam steam engine with it. Good little hobby machines.

            Comment


            • #7
              I'm only one state away, in Iowa. If you want to sell it, let me know.

              Paul A.
              Paul A.

              Make it fit.
              You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

              Comment


              • #8
                Paul,

                It is actually on ebay, located in Ohio. With the motor on my dust collector crapping out, I'm not buying anything for a while - at least until I find out if it can be fixed.

                Ed
                Ed Bryant

                Comment


                • #9
                  The Atlas is a nice machine, considering how little floor space is required. Plus it's single phase.

                  I attended an auction near Carbondale, IL, this week. Four or five K&T Horizontal Mills (each with hundreds of pounds of cutters, etc.), all went for $75 to $125.

                  Except the K&T Universal Horizontal (with L&W dividing head & tailstock, etc.) At $850 I lost interest.

                  The only drawback to the large horizontals is the fooltprint. Pretty much like two lathes, side-by-side.

                  ------------------
                  Barry Milton
                  Barry Milton

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I have a similar sized mill, and it is really handy.

                    If you put overarm support on it, it will do things that it won't without. Most little horizontal mills seem to be "chatter limited". Putting on overarm support tends to fix that.
                    1601

                    Keep eye on ball.
                    Hashim Khan

                    Comment


                    • #11

                      I have one, they work great for what they are made for. Even my BP
                      can’t do it all. If the things that you want to make are in it’s size range
                      then great. My Atlas is in my basement, that is one of the things I like
                      about it.

                      P.S. I have some parts.

                      Have Fun
                      Be Safe

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        well i have a 333 bruke. i use it a lot with a face mill to square up partes after i have bruned them out.
                        you can do a lot of work on a harazonal mill you just have to think about it and how to do it.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I've never used one of the Atlas mills but have seen them and a friend had one for a very short time.

                          IMHO, they are a little small and underpowered for much useful work and for a few hundred more you should be able to find a Clausing 8540 or Rockwell horizontal mill that would be much better. Others with different need would go for an even larger mill, but the advantage of the Clausing and Rockwell mills is that they can be farily easily moved to a basement shop that only has access through a staircase.

                          <ike
                          Mike Henry near Chicago

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by elbryant:
                            I will probably never end up with a bridgy - too heavy and too expensive, so I am always thinking of alternatives.

                            How useful are these little things?

                            ED


                            [This message has been edited by elbryant (edited 06-11-2005).]
                            </font>

                            Not wery useful at all. As a a matter of fact they're downright dangerous. Since I only live a half hour from you and I don't want to see you hurt, I'll pick it up and dispose of it for you.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Geer, all of these guys want to keep you from hurting yourself. Well I don't want to see them get hurt either so I'll take care of disposing of it right down my basement steps.
                              Forty plus years and I still have ten toes, ten fingers and both eyes. I must be doing something right.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X