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Resistance soldering tool

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  • Resistance soldering tool


    Have seen long time back shops had a trnsformer with rectifier to change ac to dc and used a carbon rod to solder with they had a foot operated switch i guess to the high voltage side , any one have any idea what the dc votage should be or any info on building one best i remember they worked pretty well,could control the heat to a small area, any help would be appreciated, thanks to all.
    mm curvin

  • #2
    Iv'e tried this with a battery charger and a piece of heavy drafting pencil lead. Polarity didn't seem to matter. As for the amps, it of course seemed to very with how heavy the pieces are and how far you may be from the joint. The closer you can get the better.

    I don't know if it would matter where you put the switch, and I think you could use a light dimmer for voltage control.

    I used an old Eico power supply for a power source but I don't remember what I set the voltage to.

    And you'll want to watch out for the carbon rod, it gets very hot.

    This place has an entire setup,
    http://www.micromark.com/
    Look under soldering.

    ------------------
    Gene

    [This message has been edited by topct (edited 06-20-2005).]
    Gene

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    • #3
      I have a set of plans/instructions in PDF file format to build your own resistance solderer.

      My friend made one from old PC parts and he is over 65 and lives in Denmark. I have a commercial one and love it.

      Email me and I will attach it by return email.
      I did zip it to save a few bytes.
      Jim

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      • #4
        I have never seen a carbon resistance soldering set up. What is the advantage of doing it this way?

        Paul A.
        Paul A.

        Make it fit.
        You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

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        • #5
          The advantage is that for very small areas and small joints you don't have the problems you might have with a flame. And it heats up very fast. Much faster than an iron. Also the carbon doesn't pollute the joint and solder wont't stick to it.

          ------------------
          Gene

          [This message has been edited by topct (edited 06-20-2005).]
          Gene

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          • #6
            One of the advantages is that the joint is part of the circuit that's passing current, so it heats up just by being in circuit. It doesn't totally rely on heat from a soldering tip conducting into the joint.
            You don't necessarily need carbon electrodes. You can use copper and typically about one volt or so at the junction. This would typically mean about two volts on the secondary winding of the transformer, with some fairly heavy and short wiring to the electrodes. I think if you use carbon electrodes, the voltage would have to be considerably higher, because you're heating the carbon to then heat the joint. The resistance of carbon is much higher than copper wire. I don't consider this true resistance soldering because it still relies a lot on the heat being conducted into the joint rather than the joint itself heating up because of the current passing through it.
            It really depends on what you intend to be soldering. Electronic components on a pc board are still best done with a regulated soldering pencil rated between 25 and 75 watts. Resistance soldering applications might typically use between 100 and 300 watts, and the type of junction you would normally be resistance soldering is one where you can pinch it with the electrodes.
            I played with this somewhat many years ago, but I'm not up on what newer equipment there might be.
            It works very well where it's suited, and lessens the chance of cold-solder joints where the junction it too large for a typical pencil or gun type soldering tool.
            I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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