Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Squeaky brass.....

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Squeaky brass.....

    I have a stick of "normal -looking" brass a few feet long and 1.25 diameter.

    Hadn't used any until now. It is the squeakiest chatteriest stuff to cut, I guess its mystery metal.....I just wanted to make a fitting out of a short piece (actually a sight glass for an oiler).

    Is there any "normal-looking" brass that cuts OK, but is very chattery and squeaky?

    I've already pretty much decided it must not be leaded brass..... and it shouldn't be any sort of odd bronze.

    I'm more-or-less wondering if it is ideantifiable and if it might be anything with "interesting" properties. I don't think a spark test will get far on it....
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  • #2
    Your cutting tools, I find 2 flute endmills work best in the mill, and for lathe, you want zero rake.

    Comment


    • #3
      if it is realy "brass" crank the feeds way up and it will "howl" but cut nice, dont baby the stuff. hog it hard and fast.

      leaded brass? that would be butter soft, run the rpm balls out and let the chips fly.

      I bet you have some aluminum bronze and its not soft at all.

      good stuff though.

      [This message has been edited by tattoomike68 (edited 06-23-2005).]

      Comment


      • #4
        Had zero rake.....and high speed. It does cut nicely on OD.

        It just likes to howl and leave chatter marks when boring, even with short fat boring bars, and went crazy drilling, even with edge flatted.

        What does aluminum bronze look like? This stuff looks like brass.
        1601

        Keep eye on ball.
        Hashim Khan

        Comment


        • #5
          I once spent hours making a new spring barrel gear ring for a musical box from a lump of brass I had in my scrap box, it too was a bugger to machine but I persevered until it was done.
          I then tried to solder the actual barrel into it. NO WAY, it just would not solder at all.
          I ended up making another from different scrap brass which was OK to solder.
          I reckon it must have been aluminium bronze.

          Its back in the scrap box !!

          Phil

          [This message has been edited by pgp001 (edited 06-23-2005).]

          Comment


          • #6
            There's a gazillion alloys called "brass" that all look more or less alike. Also a gazillion "bronze" alloys that look pretty much like the brass alloys. And they all have somewhat different properties.

            You may have a piece of some kind of bronze. Although generalities are dangerous, in general bronze tends not to machine very well because the crystalline structure of a lot of the bronze alloys doesn't have well-defined slip planes.

            Of course, for any given alloy the generality may be completely invalid....
            ----------
            Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
            Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
            Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
            There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
            Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
            Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

            Comment


            • #7
              Oz $1 and $2 coins are made from ali bronze. It has more of a gold sheen than brass and doesn't oxidize so readily. Dunno if this will help you in the US of A tho

              Comment


              • #8
                One further clue:

                The usual brasses I am familiar with machine with short chips.

                This stuff likes to form ribbons, and is "not impressed" by chipbreakers. The ribbon tends to flow over them.
                1601

                Keep eye on ball.
                Hashim Khan

                Comment


                • #9
                  I agree sounds like bronze.
                  Non, je ne regrette rien.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by J Tiers:
                    One further clue:

                    The usual brasses I am familiar with machine with short chips.

                    This stuff likes to form ribbons, and is "not impressed" by chipbreakers. The ribbon tends to flow over them.
                    </font>

                    Sounds like ali bronze to me.
                    Chips as ribbons.
                    Tough as old boots, squeals like a pig.
                    Good for rubbing surfaces, selector forks, valve guides, chucking at next doors cat, bandsaw blade guides.
                    Blunts reamers quicker that a grinding wheel.
                    Used as a bushng it will wear the shaft out first.

                    John s.



                    [This message has been edited by John Stevenson (edited 06-23-2005).]
                    .

                    Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Hmmm... That would actually be nice... I have a meter or so of 30mm dia stuff....got for $3 or thereabouts....

                      And I have wear-type applications that it would be good for.

                      Is there any sensible way to check it? It does seem to cut harder than most brass, and really doesn't "pull in" a drill.

                      'Course if I "had" to have aluminum bronze, I'd buy it as that........
                      1601

                      Keep eye on ball.
                      Hashim Khan

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X