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  • Another recent project

    I suspect you can buy these sight tubes, but the oiler part (which I had) had a strange thread, 0.585-22, and I had no confidence that I could find one to fit. The original sight tube that came with was for an engine, since it has a check valve (and wrong threads), and I'm saving it for that project.

    Made the body and screw-in top, used the glass and seals from the old tube (I can get new glass).

    Either my Dad-in-law will want it for his old P&W mill, or else it will go on my grinder project.



    [This message has been edited by J Tiers (edited 06-30-2005).]
    CNC machines only go through the motions.

    Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
    Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
    Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
    I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
    Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

  • #2
    Nice job. Well done.
    To invent, you need a good imagination - and a pile of junk. Thomas A. Edison

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    • #3
      NIce work J. That must have taken a little while

      Rob

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      • #4
        Thanks

        Actually it didn't take that long. More trouble was from me doping off and not using the order of operations I had decided on when I started......That led to some fun re-setting up with less gripping area.

        Also trying to keep the surface good needed a careful assessment of when to take a final skim cut to dimension.

        Aside from that, actually simple turning and a few milling operations for hex and windows.

        CNC machines only go through the motions.

        Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
        Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
        Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
        I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
        Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

        Comment


        • #5
          Nice job it looks professional.

          Joe

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          • #6
            One point that may be useful...

            To make the window openings, I used an end mill of the right size. But, instead of coming in from the side, I found it to be rather simple and much less jarring to the work (and setup) to come in as if it were a drill, i.e. moving the work into the end mill axially.

            That meant that the end of the EM was doing the cutting. Like drilling a hole with half its diameter hanging out of the work. Surface finish was better, and burring less that way.

            Maybe someone smarter than me can explain why.
            CNC machines only go through the motions.

            Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
            Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
            Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
            I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
            Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

            Comment


            • #7
              J.

              I ain't no smarter than you, but have been doing that trick for milling slots and groves for years.

              You have less cutting going on using that tip than the whole side of the mill.

              Tool and die makers used to use end mills with a reverse tapered mill (smaller at the shank) for milling cams for years.

              They would plunge every degree, or so, of the rotary table and make radial adjustments to form a circular cam for various applications.

              After the plunge cuts a stone would blend things in.

              Now a cnc mill does all that, no muss, no fuss.

              kap

              Comment


              • #8
                Nice job. Looks like store bought only better! I would think the plunge cut might make a neater finish in your particular application because the chips can get the hell out of the way faster! My finish seems to be largely dependent on wether or not I can get the chips out of the way fast enough! I don't know if that's true but it seems that way to me.
                - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
                Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

                It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

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