Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Tipsbook 2

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • cfoster
    replied
    Hey Guys

    I hate to keep posting and running, but these are busy times for us.

    IO: Yeah, but since its so hard to predict the "publication" length of tips, I may keep my eye on a few just in case it comes up short. If that is the case, I'll be in touch with some authors.

    So if you've posted recently and haven't heard from me, don't sweat it. You're number may be called into the game yet.

    Craig

    Leave a comment:


  • jpryan
    replied
    http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y59...n/07050001.jpg
    http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y59...n/07050002.jpg
    http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y59...n/07050003.jpg
    This is an item I made years ago it is an adjustable carriage stop for my South Bend heavy 10 inch tool room lathe. I use it in conjunction with the dial indicator set up on the back side of the lathe. I removed the original adjustment screw from the carriage stop and made a new one and drilled it out to take a 1/4 " rod with a thumb screw to adjust it to any needed length. It is a very handy and quick way to set up your carriage travel The 3 pictures should demonstrate its use. The idea should be adaptable to any lathe.
    sorry for the duplicate post. I guess a senior moment.

    Leave a comment:


  • jpryan
    replied
    This is an item I made years ago it is an adjustable carriage stop for my South Bend heavy 10 inch tool room lathe. I use it in conjunction with the dial indicator set up on the back side of the lathe. I removed the original adjustment screw from the carriage stop and made a new one and drilled it out to take a 1/4 " rod with a thumb screw to adjust it to any needed length. It is a very handy and quick way to set up your carriage travel The 3 pictures should demonstrate its use. The idea should be adaptable to any lathe.http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y59...n/07050002.jpg

    Leave a comment:


  • neonman
    replied
    I don't know if this is a duplicate, but here it goes.

    When I mill steel, the chips just seem to get everywhere, especally on me while I'm turning the crank.

    To solve this, I custom cut a protector from
    a 3 litre plastic pop bottle. I cut off the bottom & top, making a cylinder about the right height. Then I slit the side and just clip it on my setup. Sometimes I have to make other cutouts to make it fit.

    It contains nearly all the chips, I can see my work, and it's not too expensive.

    Neonman

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Soooo, any tips posted now will be in #3?

    Leave a comment:


  • cfoster
    replied
    Tipsbook 2 is in the hands of Clover McKinley, the Executive Editor of our metalworking magazines for a final look. From there, it will go to the Art/Design department.

    It's entering the home stretch.

    Craig

    [This message has been edited by cfoster (edited 07-05-2005).]

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Any update on Tip book II ?

    Leave a comment:


  • Arbo
    replied
    Plumb you air compressor intake to the outside of your shop. Then use an automotive oil filter for an air filter. (Wal Mart Super Tech ST2 screws right on 1/2" pipe.) It cuts down some on compressor noise, and keeps the airborn particulate out of your compressor. I do alot of welding, grinding, and even some painting in my shop. This gaurantees that none of that stuff is clogging my filter, and better yet extends the overall life of the compressor.

    Leave a comment:


  • aboard_epsilon
    replied
    To avoid bashing your legs on a milling machine when not in use .do this to the handles.
    ....put them on back to front


    all the best....mark

    [This message has been edited by aboard_epsilon (edited 07-03-2005).]

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Now this one has been around my shop for so long I had forgotten it could be a tip.

    Keep an old deck of cards and old medium or small screwdriver near the epoxy and J B weld.The cards are cheap stir pallets, and screwdrivers clean easily with a paper towel.Pop sickle sticks work well also then it can all be thrown away.I keep popsickles in the shop freezer for the summer heat, It can be a treat.

    Leave a comment:


  • ricksplace
    replied
    Hi Craig.

    See my post regarding hockey pucks. Pretty low tech, but it seems everyone I tell says "why didn't I think of that?"

    Rick.

    Leave a comment:


  • Your Old Dog
    replied
    I posted one some time back on making smokeprints but never heard back if it was of use to anyone or accepted. It won't replace blueprints but it sure makes some layout jobs easier and it's as accurate as any fingerprint. It may be old hat and common knowledge to machinist but I'm new to the craft!

    The old thread is here:

    http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//Fo...ML/010571.html

    If that tip don't fly here's one that might. I always have trouble perfectly matching up existing bolt holes with a new manufactured part. I hatched this idea. Take a 4inch threaded rod of the size needed and run some nuts onto it so that it can be locked up in the milling machine vice. Then mill exactly half way thru a 1/4 inch section of each end. Cut the rod in half and you have two devices that, when screwed into the holes you want to measure and placed so that the threads face each other, a caliper can be placed across the flats to tell you the center distance between each hole. Has to work better than eye for most folks and much faster. A set could easily be made for the popular bolt sizes you work with. It will damn near work in the dark which is good cause I spend a lot of time in the dark

    EDITED TO INCLUDE: I later found out these already exist! Guess I sort of re-invented the wheel as I see them mentioned in another post on relocating two holes!


    [This message has been edited by Your Old Dog (edited 07-05-2005).]

    Leave a comment:


  • D35
    replied
    We may have a well lit shop in general, but for closeup work at individual machines it seems we need that extra light. There are a variety of adjustable/flex lamps on the market..your choice of magnetic bases and a selection of clamp-ons. Some can be found at the "El Cheapo" hardware tables and do the job. Your imagination on light control by way of duplexes and light switches with the face plate color coded if need be. In our shop we have utilized many of these extra lamps.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Alciatore
    replied
    Craig,

    For another possible tip, check out the response I made to this question on reamer/mill storage:

    http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//Fo...ML/005942.html

    Paul A.

    Leave a comment:


  • darryl
    replied
    Here's a hole deburring and enlarging tip. To find out for yourself what size to drill a pilot hole to follow with a finished hole size bit, do this: start by drilling about five holes in some scrap with each of a few different sizes of bits. Go with a 1/16 in, a 3/32, a 1/8, a 3/16, and a 1/4 inch. For each of these sizes, follow the hole with a larger bit, BY HAND, and deburr it. Have the scrap piece on a flat surface as you do this. Hold the bit straight up with a finger and thumb of each hand,and spin the bit into the pilot hole, or hold it in one hand, keeping it straight on as you twist it. You'll be able to feel and see the bit center itself and either cut cleanly and evenly, or not. For each pilot hole, start with a following bit that's just a tad larger. Do the next hole with a larger bit, and keep going larger. One of those will deburr the hole just right, and feel smooth without wandering, or taking too much pressure. Do the same for all the sizes of pilot hole you've drilled, and record the results. Some of the following drill bits will have a web thickness that's too large for the pilot hole, and some will start biting the burr too far out from the web, potentially causing an out of round or an oversize hole. (and possible chipping a lip on the bit) What feels good when you deburr by hand this way is likely to be the best size to follow a pilot hole with in the drill press.
    You have two sides for each pilot hole you drill to play with, the starting side and the bottom side. The bottom will likely have the largest burr, and probably the most off-sided one. The goal is to remove the burr without the following drill wanting to go off-centered, or start to create a multi-sided entry hole for itself.
    If you can remove a lopsided burr cleanly, without folding it over, and without creating a lobed pattern at the entry to the pilot hole, then that's a good sized bit to follow the pilot hole with.

    For the sake of this experiment, start with a decent set of factory sharpened bits. The results will vary with different angles and clearances ground on the bits, the sharpness, as well as whether or not different length lips are on each bit.

    Some people like to enlarge a hole with multiple bits, and some like just a pilot hole followed by a finish size bit. If you're a newbie, or are having problems drilling accurate holes, the results of this experiment should show you what would work best for you.

    If the range of holes you would likely be drilling is from say a half-inch and larger, scale the experiment up accordingly.

    [This message has been edited by darryl (edited 06-17-2005).]

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X