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  • I learnt something tonight

    after my touch football we headed out to a local Bar & Grill for some food. The waitress was pretty but she seemed slow. Forgetfull and not in a rush.

    Complaining about this, which, beleive it or not, is realy not my style, my budy Jeff said:

    "Well i think she is doing realy well for a deaf girl"

    OH wow. It never even phased me. That is how good she was at conceiling her handicap. I felt like a heel. I then noticed that the things she was slow on were items i said as she had her back to us. As in "Another glass of water please", "More salt", etc

    Never judge a book by its cover...How True!

    Humbly yours

    Rob

    [This message has been edited by spkrman15 (edited 07-12-2005).]

  • #2
    Thats deaf girl

    Jerry

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    • #3
      <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by jfsmith:
      Thats deaf girl

      Jerry
      </font>

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      • #4
        I don't want to be around the death girl, it would mean it's my time to go, and I have to many chips to make to leave this world now.


        Jerry

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        • #5
          Good post Rob!

          Deafness would have to be the worst handicaps for the very reason you have pointed out, you can't see it. I mean most people will recognise a blind person straight off or a person with a limp or in a wheel chair etc. But a deaf person, well everything seams ok, but they ignore you or don't respond naturally. Like the waiter.

          If you have good hearing, look after it. It is more fragile than you think.

          John.

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          • #6
            My wife used to work at a sprint tty office. For those that dont know what that is, it is was the place where a deaf person could ue a special machine and type their message, then a operator at my wife's work would relay the message to the person on the other end of the line. Anyways a good percentage of the people that worked their in the office were deaf and I went by there quite a bit. Most of them could read lips so you wouldnt even know they were deaf unless they had there back to you and didn't respond. Pretty amazing how people adapt.

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            • #7
              I am almost deaf too, I hate the phone, a cell phone would be almost worthless, you must look at me when you talk.

              the good part is my woman can mow grass and vaccume the rug in the morning and not wake me up.

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              • #8
                Where we worked for many years, anyone using cotton for hearing protection was a 'candyass'. Now paying the price, several fold.

                We find it a little more difficult listening to someone when we can't see their lips, and troubles double if that person has a very large moustache.

                Only positive point in being hard of hearing: The local juror selection people have permantly kicked me off of their invite list.

                G

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                • #9
                  That reminds me of a waitress I had the (mis)fortune of having serve me a few years back who acted like she was deaf and blind. I had come in a little behind the rest of the crew and had taken a place at a table with them. They had ordered already and I tried, unsuccessfully, to get the waitress's eye several times... she wasn't really busy, just ticked that I wasn`t with the whole table when she took their orders. FINALLY she came up and asked what I wanted...I calmly said "I'll have the special of the day and get a bisquit for your seeing eye dog, too." She got the point.

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                  • #10
                    Mochinist, not only can they read lips, many can read them at great distances!

                    My fathers friend was married to a deaf girl. She always sat within eyesite of her husband. She'd be in the living room with my mother and then break out laughing because of something she saw with the guys in the kitchen! In many cases the term "handicap" applies to those of us without any afflictions, us normies!

                    [This message has been edited by Your Old Dog (edited 07-12-2005).]
                    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
                    Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

                    It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

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                    • #11
                      let me tell you about beeing deaf. i have a severe hearing loss. all through school i was thought to be retarded or daydreamng. i would hear things like kick the dummy to wake him up. it was not till i tried to join the navy that it was found out about my hearing. that was in 69. now looking back did i miss much? i dont know but there sure is a lot of b.s. i did not. so maybe i was better off.

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                      • #12

                        Lost most of my hearing in 68/69. 175 to 400 mortars every
                        day for four months.

                        The last thing that you think about in a mortar attack is
                        sticking your fingers in your ears.

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                        • #13



                          I'm deaf in one ear and ignore people with the other. Mostly true, but had enough hearing to get into the Navy in '69.

                          Any background noise cancels my ability to make any sense out of most human speech, presuming that the speech made any sense to begin with. I find bars, parties and wedding receptions to range from tedious to downright uncomfortable to be in. Why is it that LOUD music is considered necessary in these places?

                          My wife's hearing is declining somewhat but she tries to fill in the blanks, plugging in words that seem to fit. The result is sometimes hilarious, sometimes embarassing. Over the years I have quit trying to understand what I don't hear clearly, instead making the speaker repeat the whole sentence. May be annoying, but there are no misunderstandings

                          Wes

                          Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
                          ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

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                          • #14
                            <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by jfsmith:
                            Thats deaf girl

                            Jerry
                            </font>
                            Ha ha. I thought of the "death chicks", which is what we used to call the girls in pale white makeup, shocking red lipstick, and all black clothing and shoes. I believe the new PC term is "goth".
                            The curse of having precise measuring tools is being able to actually see how imperfect everything is.

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                            • #15
                              I hope i did not offend anyone with my Freudian slip in my initial post. I have since corrected it.

                              i have also realised that i can put my foot, shin and knee in my mouth. I guess i learnt that too!!


                              Rob

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