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  • #16
    Hey Morgan, nice looking machine. Good to have some young blood around here to balance all the old farts. Good luck, and watch those fingers.....Goober sayes Hey!
    Smitty.... Ride Hard, Die Fast

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    • #17
      ***NOOB ALERT***


      Whats with the strange pattern on the ways shown in the photo? Maybe something to do with the grinding process?

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      • #18
        that's known as flaking. It has a couple of purposes. The first is oil rentention. A perfectly smooth surface wouldn't retain oil and the slideways would "wring" together, rendering it impossible to move the table, the flaking breaks up that smooth surface, preventing said "wringing."

        The other purpose is decorative, and to show wear. If the flaking is gone, you can tell that there is some fairly serious wear on the machine. Besides, it just looks snazzy.

        -Justin

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        • #19
          Don't take this the wrong way, but

          YOU SUCK!

          Color me green with envy. That machine is everything I wish my BP was. Congratulations man, you've got a lot to smile about.

          ------------------
          Pursue Excellence and the rest will follow.
          Pursue Excellence and the rest will follow.

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          • #20
            I think Thrud said before that Flaking doesnt do anything but make your machine wear out faster, but hell, thats some real beutiful flaking! Nice Mill, and it has a DRO as well. Geez, A noob with a Bridgeport, looks like you been listening. That mill could mill my mill down in a couple passes.

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            • #21
              Great looking machine you got there. Treat it well and it should last you a long time.

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              • #22
                Nice looking mill.

                As for getting it off the pallet, it appears harder than it is. I got my Series II on a pallet and scratched my head for a couple of days trying to figure how I was going to get it off. A friend of mine came over and within two hours it was done - safely.

                What we did was to use a long pry bar to lift the machine (back first, then front) slightly to get spacers underneath each corner. Kept doing that until there was about 2" of air underneath the machine. Don't do too much at once or you could tip the machine. Also helps if you can lower the knee and rotate the head around to lower the CG. We couldn't do that so we took 'er slow.

                After it was spaced up. We put two longish pieces of 1.5" square heavy wall tubing under the machine, creating a track running off the pallet. Make sure you support the ends of the tubing and the centre and near the pallet edge (we used scrap aluminum blocks).

                Using the pry bar we lifted and removed the spacers (same way we got them in) until the mill was sitting on the tubing "track". Some gear oil was slathered on the track and we used the pry bar to inch the machine forward until it was off the pallet. GO SLOW. Do not let the mill slide to the side, forward only! (It's not that hard to do, just don't get cocky).

                Once it was off the pallet, we put the spacers under it again, removed the tubing. Then you can remove the spacers or lower it onto some bars to roll it around to where you want it. No problemo.

                Stay safe,

                Gary



                [This message has been edited by Gary Rose (edited 07-19-2005).]

                [This message has been edited by Gary Rose (edited 07-19-2005).]

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                • #23
                  I moved my BP with a borrowed pallet jack. It was never on a pallet, per se. It was trucked while bolted to a bunch of 4x4s, and I used shorter blocks of 4x4 to put the mill down on. When I did the final positioning, I used a free-standing engine hoist connected to a beefy eye-bolt screwed into the middle of the ram. (I had one of those heavy cloth straps I was going to use for lifting, but I couldn't manage a stable configuration.)

                  Later, I used a crowbar and scraps of varying-thickness stainless sheet to shim the base to get it level. Works great.

                  I have to say, though, that your BP is nicer than the one I got. Nice find!

                  -M

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