Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

I just love it when my machines saves $$$$

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • I just love it when my machines saves $$$$

    Machined a new fuel pump flange for a friend's Honda CRX. The flange had rusted and it was leaking fuel. The pump was in working condition but the dealer only sold the completely assembly for over $500 CDN !! It costed me about $2 in steel,$2 of silver solder and about 4 hours of sheer fun in the garage. He now owes me a 24oz steak dinner, but I've already been paid handsomely by my sense of achievement and feeling smug about beating the system.

    How on earth can these companies justify charging so much for their parts?

    Albert

  • #2
    Greed

    Comment


    • #3
      Greed maybe, but Rotate demonstrates the free market at work to correct the problem.

      ------------------
      Neil Peters
      Neil Peters

      When on the hunt, a broken part is better than no part at all.

      Comment


      • #4
        Ah yes our modern society! Never fix, only replace the borken 10 cent part with an assembly that costs a fortune!
        John B

        Comment


        • #5
          Some day I will either learn to spell or proof read
          John B

          Comment


          • #6
            Jr45,

            It's much more fun when you don't!

            Comment


            • #7
              I would not call it a 10c part for from Rotate's perspective it was an $64-84 USA part.

              ------------------
              Neil Peters
              Neil Peters

              When on the hunt, a broken part is better than no part at all.

              Comment


              • #8
                Albert,
                Now you can justify all your machines.

                Rick

                [This message has been edited by chip's (edited 09-25-2002).]

                Comment


                • #9
                  I had a similar experience with my sister's '92 Nissan Maxima. The ABS module -what controls the anti lock braking functions, has many joints, solenoids and a motor to pump the brakes- was leaking profusely! A call to the LFND- local friendly Nissan dealer- revealed that, yes, this has been a problem, but no- they did not have a seal kit or any way to fix it besides replacing the module. "How Much?" I ask. "Are you sitting down?" they reply. "Yup" I said. "The module will cost you $1,259." After I picked myself off the floor, I said "I'll take it apart and fix it myself!" Click went the phone. Close inspection revealed a crack in an aluminum tube connecting the solenoid array with the pulser motor. A new one of steel took 20 minutes to make and a further 10 minutes to assemble. The job took maybe 2 hours, start to finish, including bleeding. Couldn't charge my poor sister anything, though! I can see them charging this much for the whole unit. But what gets me is the dealer will just do what I did if they are intelligent and STILL charge for the new assembly! Like Al says, Greed!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Seems that many auto parts are said to be unrepairable,GREED,because of the liability factor,GREED. Where I used to work,they were scared to do any repairs like that,STUPID,and would toss out a part that would only need a slight amount of thinking to be repaired as good or better than new.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      There is a mentality among manufactirers that folks do not repair things anymore. To some extent that is true, like stereo equipment, which when I wa fixing it cost $40 per hour for labor but is now much higher.
                      Even at the old cost many would just junk it.

                      Now, many things are NOT repairable in a practical way. To repair a surface-mount electronics board takes a $1200 repair station (more if you want to do it fast), and a large library of parts.
                      The board costs the mfgr $30, so he says "nope".
                      The board at the repair station costs nearly $200, since mfgr sells it for $90 and it is marked up again.

                      There is some sense, since there are an awful lot of parts anymore, and they change twice a year. Stocking them all, including ones not used in production, ties up an enormous capital, and to have them available SOMEONE has to stock them.

                      Then pulling one out of stock and sending it off may actually cost a mfgr as much as $25 or more per occurrence, since it may take 10 or 15 minutes process time from order to on-the UPS truck.
                      That leaves a $30 reward for taking the trouble to have the darn thing.

                      Usually fora module, nobody but the mfgr will repair it, because the information is not made available. This in turn is because nobody has time to diagnose and sort out the repairables from the deaders.
                      At the end of the day, repairs cost as much as new, for many things.

                      Now, if you can fix it yourself, more power to you.
                      NOW, suppose the ABS fails, and your sister gets in an accident. The other attorney will likely have someone look at the brakes. What do they see?
                      They see an "amateur backyard fix" made by an "unqualified person", someone to whom safety was less important than "saving a few dollars".
                      Before you know it, you and/or your sister will be made to look like an Enron exec, and the case will end with you on the toasting fork.

                      Same goes for "factory fixed" units like that. Even "remanufactured" safety equipment can have you AND the repair folks be made out to be reckless and pennypinching instead of safety-oriented.
                      Thus, "fixed" things have got a bad name, and so it is easier not to fix them.

                      [This message has been edited by Oso (edited 09-25-2002).]

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I think I boo-booed

                        [This message has been edited by Thrud (edited 09-25-2002).]

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Thrud:
                          Oso:
                          I think we should just put a lawyer in the lap of every Texan fried in the chair - as an "inmate weight".

                          The worst case of "parts abuse is aviation. I have a friend who is a helicopter mech. He got me some guts to a turbine - before he could, the serial # are ground off, and a stratigic piece is ground off so it cannot be reused. I have a compressor blade assembly, the blades are bent over, mangled, and chewed up (Ate a rock). I asked him why each blade (about 400) where marked. "Oh, the parts are sent out to be NDT inspected (magnaflx, x-ray)." I said why, it is obviously NFG just deregister it and toss it. He say "Transport Canada AND the FAA require it - they have to know if it is servicable." I said to him, they must have good drugs in the TC & the FAA to not look at this and say "hey, it's baked let's toss it." No, they want scientific proof it is garbage. No wonder plane tickets cost so much.

                          Albert
                          Way to go! If you ever have to get any modules for a newer car it realy sucks, they will not allow return of the part even if the service department does the work - that is really standing behind your lousy merchandise! I have repaired modules for Mopar's the hard way - reverse engineering their crappy circuits. They grind the standard chip numbers off the tops of the cases to prevent $0.24 replacement of a cooked chip on $189 modules. I really hate it when the bastards pot it - you have to dig, and dig. Screw them, I am a cheap bastard too.
                          </font>

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            My dad had a 91 Buick, through troubleshooting, I found out it was running on 5/6 cylinders. Found dead injector by pulling wires 1 at a time. Swapped wires on 2 injectors, problem moved. Made up simple tester, 1 resistor and 1 LED, all others flash, no signal on bad wire to injector. Uh oh, bad computer.

                            Dad went up to garage, never said a thing and let them test it. Guy says #3 had a clogged injector,wants to replace it for $280. Dad asked if he checked signal at wire. No, it's gotta be the injector. Dad explains what we found, mechanic says he has to change injector first, he has no way to check signal or computer other than replacing it.

                            He brought the car home, I traced wires back to computer hoping for a break, no such luck. Trace connections to large transistors, found driver for injector. started comparing comonents on bad driver set to a good one, found open surface mount resistor. Soldered 2cent 1/4 watt resistor across it, cars been running great for 6 months now.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              In the end, machining your own parts or reparing things are not about being cheap or saving money. More often than not many of the things that I do in the garage makes no business sense, but boy do I enjoy doing it and for us HSM that's what it's all about.

                              I don't know about you guys, but I literally fall a sleep dreaming about what to machine next. What is this affliction called? Ferraphilia?

                              Albert

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X